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Source: Economic Perspectives
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Barrow, Lisa
Child Care Costs and the Return-to-Work Decisions of New Mothers
Economic Perspectives 23,4 (November 1999): 42-55.
Also: http://ideas.repec.org/a/fip/fedhep/y1999iqivp42-55nv.23no.4.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Keyword(s): Child Care; Economics of Gender; Family Income; Household Composition; Maternal Employment; Wealth; Work Histories

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this article, I examine the economic determinants of a woman's decision to return to work quickly following childbirth. I consider three key factors in this decision: the opportunity cost of taking time out of the labor force (that is, the potential wage rate available to a woman), the wealth effect of other family income, and most particularly, the opportunity cost of working outside the home in terms of child care costs.

I first describe a simple theoretical model of a new mother's return-to-work decision. The model predicts that the decision to return to work will depend on a woman's wage net of hourly child care costs and other family income (including spouse or partner income). I then test the theoretical model as closely as possible. In order to get a measure of child care costs faced by women as they decide whether to return to work, I calculate average child care worker wages across states and over time to proxy for variation in child care cost across states and over time. I find that women with higher wages are significantly more likely to return to work, and women facing higher child care costs or having greater other family income are significantly less likely to return to work after first birth. I also find that older women, women with more education, and women whose adult female role model was working when they were teenagers are more likely to return to work.

Bibliography Citation
Barrow, Lisa. "Child Care Costs and the Return-to-Work Decisions of New Mothers." Economic Perspectives 23,4 (November 1999): 42-55.
2. Mazumder, Bhashkar
Black-White Differences in Inter-Generational Economic Mobility in the U.S.
Economic Perspectives 38,1 (2014):.
Also: https://www.chicagofed.org/digital_assets/publications/economic_perspectives/2014/1Q2014_part1_mazumder.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Disadvantaged, Economically; Income Distribution; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility, Economic; Racial Differences; Social Security; Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP); Wage Gap; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this study, I attempt to advance our understanding along several dimensions. First, I use two data sets containing larger intergenerational samples than have been used in the previous literature. One of the data sets matches individuals in the U.S. Census Bureau’s Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to administrative earnings records from the Social Security Administration (SSA). This matched data set provides many more years of data on parents’ earnings than most surveys and is likely to be less prone to measurement error, since it is derived from tax records. In addition, the SIPP contains data on key characteristics of the parents, such as wealth levels and marital history. The other data source I use is the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). In addition to containing a rich array of information as children transition from adolescence to adulthood, such as test scores and personality traits, the NLSY also measures total family income in both generations, giving it an advantage over the SIPP. Using a measure of economic status that includes the income of the spouse avoids selecting only women who participate in the labor market.
Bibliography Citation
Mazumder, Bhashkar. "Black-White Differences in Inter-Generational Economic Mobility in the U.S." Economic Perspectives 38,1 (2014):.
3. Rissman, Ellen R.
Self-Employment Duration of Younger Men Over the Business Cycle
Economic Perspectives 30,3 (Q III, 2006): 14-27.
Also: http://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:fip:fedhep:y:2006:i:qiii:p:14-27:n:v.30no.3
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Keyword(s): Job Turnover; Labor Market Demographics; Self-Employed Workers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The article presents information related to self-employment of youths. Self-employment is a fluid labor market state, exhibiting a great deal of turnover. People can be attached to self-employment for a number of reasons. Aggregate and local labor market conditions play an important role in determining the duration of self-employment. A growing economy appears to encourage people who are self-employed to exit self-employment.
Bibliography Citation
Rissman, Ellen R. "Self-Employment Duration of Younger Men Over the Business Cycle." Economic Perspectives 30,3 (Q III, 2006): 14-27.