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Source: Department of Sociology, Harvard University
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Turley Lopez, Ruth N.
Are Children of Young Mothers Disadvantaged Because of Their Mother's Age or Because of Her Family Background?
Working Paper, Department of Sociology, Harvard University, Cambridge MA, October 2000
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Sociology, Harvard University
Keyword(s): Age at Birth; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Family Background; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While some studies have attributed the cognitive disadvantage of children born to young mothers to maternal competency and maturity level, this study suggests that maternal age per se is not an important predictor of children's outcomes because maternal age at subsequent births does not affect subsequent children. A controversial study by Geronimus et al. (1994) found that their disadvantage is not explained by mother's age but by her family background (as captured by the comparison of children born to sisters). This study extends their cross-sectional analyses and finds that maternal family background also explains the children's rates of cognitive improvement over time. Thus, family background is a more important preditor of children's outcomes than maternal age at birth.
Bibliography Citation
Turley Lopez, Ruth N. "Are Children of Young Mothers Disadvantaged Because of Their Mother's Age or Because of Her Family Background?" Working Paper, Department of Sociology, Harvard University, Cambridge MA, October 2000.
2. Turley, Ruth N. Lopez
Maternal Age and Child Cognitive Development: Maternal Maturity vs. Family Background
Working Paper, Department of Sociology, Harvard University, December 1999.
Also: http://www.wjh.harvard.edu/~turley/JMF2.PDF
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Sociology, Harvard University
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While some studies have attributed the cognitive disadvantage of children born to young mothers to maternal competency and level of maturity, a controversial study by Geronimus et al. (1994) found that their disadvantage is not explained by the mother's age but by her family background. This study extends their cross-sectional analyses and finds that maternal family background also explains the children's rates of cognitive improvement over time. Furthermore, it also finds that maternal family background explains more of the association between maternal age and children's cognitive development than the children's home environment.
Bibliography Citation
Turley, Ruth N. Lopez. "Maternal Age and Child Cognitive Development: Maternal Maturity vs. Family Background." Working Paper, Department of Sociology, Harvard University, December 1999.
3. Williams, Tiana
Punishing Race and Suspending Futures: The Effects of Suspension on Young Adult Involvement in the Criminal Justice System
Honors Thesis (B.A.), Harvard College, March 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Department of Sociology, Harvard University
Keyword(s): Arrests; Criminal Justice System; Gender Differences; Incarceration/Jail; Modeling; Racial Differences; School Suspension/Expulsion; Undergraduate Research

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous research has identified that a racial discipline gap exists in school punishments and that suspensions hinder academic achievement and foster delinquent behavior. However, researchers have given little attention to discovering the connection between the racial discipline gap in the education system and the disproportionate representation of minorities in the criminal justice system. Therefore, my research adds to the existing body of work by exploring how school discipline strategies affect young adult involvement in the criminal justice system. Specifically, I will examine three questions. How do factors such as race, class, and delinquency influence suspension risk for students? How do suspensions influence arrest risk for young adults over time? Finally, how do students’ shape their own risk of incarceration by adopting certain attitudes?

I address these questions by conducting an empirical analysis of young adults nationally using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997 (NLSY97). I begin with a breakdown of the race and gender patterns in delinquency, suspensions, arrest, and attitudes. Then I conduct two survival analyses to identify how race and gender impact time to suspension and time to arrest for all respondents in the NLSY97. Finally, I run a series of Cox regression models to identify how factors such as race, socio-economic status, educational attainment, and attitude impact students’ risk of suspension and incarceration.

Bibliography Citation
Williams, Tiana. "Punishing Race and Suspending Futures: The Effects of Suspension on Young Adult Involvement in the Criminal Justice System." Honors Thesis (B.A.), Harvard College, March 2012.