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Source: Chicago Tribune
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Auerbach, Debra
America at Age 24: An Education and Employment Snapshot
Chicago Tribune, February 14, 2012.
Also: http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-xpm-2012-02-14-chi-education-employment-experience-jobs-20120214-story.html
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Chicago Tribune
Keyword(s): Education; Employment; Longitudinal Data Sets

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Findings are presented from the 13th round of the NLSY97, based on a 2012 BLS news release.
Bibliography Citation
Auerbach, Debra. "America at Age 24: An Education and Employment Snapshot." Chicago Tribune, February 14, 2012.
2. Baurac, Deborah Rissing
Marriage Gives Women a Wealth Advantage
Chicago Tribune, August 11, 1999, Section 8 WomanNews; Page 3
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Chicago Tribune
Keyword(s): Assets; Gender; Savings; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Younger female Baby Boomers tend to have more wealth than their male counterparts, according to a new nationwide survey. Research scientist Jay Zagorsky of Ohio State University's Center for Human Resource Research found that young women's accumulated wealth--assets such as a car, home, savings and 401(k) accounts, minus debts--averages $141,710. Young men's average wealth is $134,511. That may buy a smile for women, but smugness won't pay. The difference is because respondents gave combined data for themselves and their spouses, Zagorsky says. "Females tend to marry older men, usually by about four years. So their older spouses got four more years to save." For 10 years, Zagorsky followed 6,800 adults, born between 1957 and 1964, beginning when they were in their 20s. He learned that young people increase their net wealth by about $2,400 each year and most do so without payoffs from playing the stock market. Also, in 1998, financial assets--savings, CDs, stocks, bonds, IRAs--averaged $7,900 for both genders.
Bibliography Citation
Baurac, Deborah Rissing. "Marriage Gives Women a Wealth Advantage." Chicago Tribune, August 11, 1999, Section 8 WomanNews; Page 3.
3. Bostedt, Shelbie Lynn
Women are Literally Working Themselves to Death
Chicago Tribune, July 5, 2016.
Also: http://www.chicagotribune.com/redeye/redeye-women-are-literally-working-themselves-to-death-20160705-story.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Chicago Tribune
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Health, Chronic Conditions; Illnesses; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Women who put in long hours on the job are more at risk for life-threatening illnesses such as heart disease and cancer. [News media article based on Dembe, Allard E. and Xiaoxi Yao. "Chronic Disease Risks From Exposure to Long-Hour Work Schedules Over a 32-Year Period." Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 58,9 (September 2016): 861-867]
Bibliography Citation
Bostedt, Shelbie Lynn. "Women are Literally Working Themselves to Death." Chicago Tribune, July 5, 2016.
4. Little, Heather M.
Family Benefits if Mom's Career is Challenging
Chicago Tribune, July 31, 1994.
Also: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1994-07-31-9407310058-story.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Chicago Tribune
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Behavioral Development; Cognitive Development; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A national study suggests the effects of a mother's work on her children's intellectual development and behavior depends on the kind of job she has. [News media article based on Parcel, Toby L. and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "Early Parental Work, Family Social Capital, and Early Childhood Outcomes." American Journal of Sociology 99, 4 (January 1994): 972-1009]
Bibliography Citation
Little, Heather M. "Family Benefits if Mom's Career is Challenging." Chicago Tribune, July 31, 1994.
5. Olsen, Patrick
Husbands, Wives See Finances Differently
Red Eye (Chicago Tribune), June 6, 2003
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Older Men, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Chicago Tribune
Keyword(s): Earnings; Earnings, Husbands; Earnings, Wives; Economic Well-Being; Family Income; Husbands, Income; Income; Wives, Income

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Newspaper article on research showing that when couples are asked separately about finances, very different views emerge of income and wealth.
Bibliography Citation
Olsen, Patrick. "Husbands, Wives See Finances Differently." Red Eye (Chicago Tribune), June 6, 2003.
6. Stevens, Heidi
Study: Financially Dependent Spouses Are More Likely to Cheat
Chicago Tribune, Life and Style Section, June 1, 2015.
Also: http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/ct-cheating-spouse-financial-dependency-balancing-20150601-column.html
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Chicago Tribune
Keyword(s): Earnings, Husbands; Earnings, Wives; Economic Independence; Marital Conflict; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

[Excerpt from the news article] People are more like to cheat as they become more economically dependent on their spouses, according to a study released Monday in the June issue of the American Sociological Review. (See journal article by Christin L. Munsch, "Her Support, His Support: Money, Masculinity, and Marital Infidelity." American Sociological Review 80,3 (June 2015): 469-495).

Other media outlets posted similar articles about the research. See, for instance, The Washington Post's 6/4/2015 Wonkblog article "The Fascinating Connection between How Much Married People Make and How Likely They Are to Cheat" by Max Ehrenfreund.

Bibliography Citation
Stevens, Heidi. "Study: Financially Dependent Spouses Are More Likely to Cheat." Chicago Tribune, Life and Style Section, June 1, 2015.
7. Trice, Dawn Turner
Racial Identity Not Determined by Skin Tone Alone
Chicago Tribune, December 15, 2008.
Also: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-2008-12-15-0812140201-story.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Chicago Tribune
Keyword(s): Racial Differences; Racial Equality/Inequality; Self-Perception; Skin Tone; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

How we define race is not a fixed social construct, but ever-evolving. Indeed, race is about skin color. But the study also looked at the way negative stereotypes, socioeconomic class and myriad other factors give us racial cues into how we see other people as well as ourselves. [This news media article is based on Penner, Andrew M. and Aliya Saperstein. "How Social Status Shapes Race." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 105,50 (December 16, 2008): 19628-19630]
Bibliography Citation
Trice, Dawn Turner. "Racial Identity Not Determined by Skin Tone Alone." Chicago Tribune, December 15, 2008.