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Title: The Effects of Work Hours on Physical and Mental Health of Late Prime Age Men and Women
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Ricketts, Comfort F.
Campbell, Randall C.
Rezek, Jon P.
The Effects of Work Hours on Physical and Mental Health of Late Prime Age Men and Women
The American Economist 64,2 (October 2019): 216-236.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0569434519848977
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Omicron Delta Phi
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Our results show that negative returns to health outcomes set in at around 50 work hours per week, and that the negative effects of working long hours manifest earlier for women than men. Increased work hours are associated with higher incomes and better access to medical care. However, increased work hours also generate greater physical and mental stress, which may cause health problems. We examine these questions empirically with data from the 2006 wave of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), using two-stage least squares to account for endogeneity of work hours and income in the health outcomes model.
Bibliography Citation
Ricketts, Comfort F., Randall C. Campbell and Jon P. Rezek. "The Effects of Work Hours on Physical and Mental Health of Late Prime Age Men and Women." The American Economist 64,2 (October 2019): 216-236.