Search Results

Title: The Effects of Parental Work and Maternal Nonemployment on Children's Reading and Math Achievement
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Parcel, Toby L.
Nickoll, Rebecca A.
Dufur, Mikaela J.
The Effects of Parental Work and Maternal Nonemployment on Children's Reading and Math Achievement
Work and Occupations 23,4 (November 1996): 461-483.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/23/4/461.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birthweight; Child Health; Children, Academic Development; Cognitive Development; Education; Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

James Coleman's theory regarding family social capital and Mel Kohn's ideas regarding work and personality suggest that parental work may affect child cognition. Using a sample of 1,067 nine- to twelve-year-old children of working and non-working mothers from the 1992 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth's Child-Mother data set, it was found that the most important determinants of children's reading and math achievement were characteristics of the children and parents themselves. Paternal work hours had some effects on math achievement, and maternal work influenced reading achievement under some conditions. Policies allowing parents of either sex to schedule work flexibly may facilitate child cognitive achievement. Copyright Sage Publications Inc. 1996. Fulltext online. Photocopy available from ABI/INFORM.
Bibliography Citation
Parcel, Toby L., Rebecca A. Nickoll and Mikaela J. Dufur. "The Effects of Parental Work and Maternal Nonemployment on Children's Reading and Math Achievement." Work and Occupations 23,4 (November 1996): 461-483.