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Title: Gender Differences in Wages and Job Turnover Among Continuously Employed Workers
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Light, Audrey L.
Ureta, Manuelita
Gender Differences in Wages and Job Turnover Among Continuously Employed Workers
American Economic Review 80,2 (May 1990): 293-297.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2006587
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: American Economic Association
Keyword(s): Behavior; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; Job Turnover; Labor Force Participation; Mobility; Mobility, Job; Women; Work Histories

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses the Young Men and Young Women cohorts of the NLS to determine whether a significant number of women work continuously during their early careers, which women are likely to do so, and how these women compare to men in terms of their interfirm mobility and earnings. It was found that roughly 88 percent of the women in our sample spend more than ten percent of their time working when they are between the ages of 24 and 30, while 25 percent work for more than 90 percent of their time. However, women are far more likely to work a large fraction of their time if they have a college education, and there has been a tremendous increase over time in the fraction of white women (especially those who are well educated) who work at least 90 percent of their time. In comparing the job turnover behavior of continuously employed men and women, the authors found that both genders exhibit identical degrees of negative duration dependence. While women born in 1944-46 are less likely than men to leave their jobs (regardless of race, education, and current tenure), the opposite is true for a cohort born just six years later. In comparing starting wages of men and women, it was found that the wage gap is less pronounced among continuously employed workers than among the full sample in almost every race-cohort-schooling group, and the gap is narrowing far more rapidly among the continuously employed.
Bibliography Citation
Light, Audrey L. and Manuelita Ureta. "Gender Differences in Wages and Job Turnover Among Continuously Employed Workers." American Economic Review 80,2 (May 1990): 293-297.