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Title: Determinants and Consequences of Retirement Among Men of Different Races and Economic Levels
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Fillenbaum, Gerda G.
George, Linda K.
Palmore, Erdman B.
Determinants and Consequences of Retirement Among Men of Different Races and Economic Levels
Journal of Gerontology 40,1 (January 1985): 85-94.
Also: http://geronj.oxfordjournals.org/content/40/1/85.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): Health Factors; Racial Differences; Retirement; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

This paper examined predictors and consequences of retirement for black and white men differing in economic status. Data were drawn from the Social Security Administration's Retirement History Surveys (1969 and 1975) and the National Longitudinal Surveys (1966 and 1976). Basic work-related characteristics were the only predictors of retirement for black men, while more varied matters predicted retirement for whites. For blacks, the impacts of retirement were few and centered on economic and health matters. Economic consequences of retirement for black men were minimal, probably because they were recipients of age-related income supports and other income subsidies and supplements and had received low pre-retirement incomes. There were fewer determinants of retirement for low than for high income earners. Retirement tended to level incomes. Economically marginal men--those whose preretirement incomes lay between poverty level and the intermediate budget level--were most affected by retirement. Methodological issues are also discussed. [AgeLine]
Bibliography Citation
Fillenbaum, Gerda G., Linda K. George and Erdman B. Palmore. "Determinants and Consequences of Retirement Among Men of Different Races and Economic Levels." Journal of Gerontology 40,1 (January 1985): 85-94.