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Title: Antecedents of Managerial and Professional Career Trajectories and Their Differential Effects on Blacks and Whites: Gaining Parity Through Human and Social Capital
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Parks-Yancy, Rochelle
Antecedents of Managerial and Professional Career Trajectories and Their Differential Effects on Blacks and Whites: Gaining Parity Through Human and Social Capital
Academy of Management Proceedings (2002): A1- A6.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/direct.asp?an=7516568&db=buh
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academy of Management
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Human Capital; Income Distribution; Labor Market Outcomes; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research has shown that blacks and whites do not have the same level of success in managerial and professional careers. On average, whites gain higher salaries and rewards and obtain jobs that have greater responsibility and authority than blacks. While there has been extensive research on the effects family socioeconomic status (SES) (Blau & Duncan, 1967) and human capital (Durham et. al., 1995) on labor market outcomes, there has not been sufficient attention given to the effects of social capital on blacks compared to whites (Seibert et. al., 2001). This paper explores the effects of social capital on income differences between blacks and whites, net of the effects of socioeconomic background and human capital, for a sample of young adults. While extensive research has documented the labor market outcomes for blacks and whites, there is relatively limited research on blacks in managerial and professional careers. Prior research specifically on blacks has looked at the career progress of blacks who participated in the youth development program, ABC (A Better Chance), (Zweigenhaft & Domhoff, 1991), racial and gender differences in performance assessments (Smith et. al., 2001) and minorities' success in corporate management (DiTomaso &Thompson, 1988).

The data were from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). These data are ideal for this study because its longitudinal format enables the study of careers over time and contains measures that can be used as indicators of family SES, human capital, and social capital. This study focused on the time frame of 1988-1998, chosen because the youngest of the respondents in 1979 (aged 14) would have been at an age to have completed college (if they attended) and be employed in full-time work in 1988. Survey questions included as measures in this paper were not necessarily asked of the respondents every year. The sample size for the analysis herein included 221 blacks and 537 whites.

Bibliography Citation
Parks-Yancy, Rochelle. "Antecedents of Managerial and Professional Career Trajectories and Their Differential Effects on Blacks and Whites: Gaining Parity Through Human and Social Capital." Academy of Management Proceedings (2002): A1- A6.