Search Results

Title: A Documentation of Woman's Intersectorial and Occupational Mobility Using a Multidimensional Model of Economic Segmentation
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Wilson, Alisa
A Documentation of Woman's Intersectorial and Occupational Mobility Using a Multidimensional Model of Economic Segmentation
Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Southern California, 1984
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Mobility, Job; Occupations; Women

This study of women's movement between segments of the economy assesses whether intersectoral mobility occurs and whether selected industry characteristics prohibit such movement. Interest in these questions stems from the belief that industries, as structural institutions, exert a unique influence on the mobility process. The first part of the study seeks to determine whether economic segmentation is more realistically portrayed by a bifurcated model of the economy, as suggested by dual economy theory, or by an empirically defined model of economic segmentation which allocates industries to sectors on the basis of ten concept groups: concentration, size, capital intensity or labor intensity, foreign involvement, government intervention, profit, autonomy, productivity, unionization, and growth. The dual economy typology is rejected in favor of a multidimensional typology of economic segmentation. Major findings are: (1) intersectoral mobility occurs, albeit with decreasing frequency as women age. (2) black women and white women exhibit quite different mobility patterns for the two time periods in question. (3) industrial sectors retain women between time 1 and time 2 on a basis much greater than that expected to occur by chance. This finding confirms the independent effect that industrial groupings exert on labor market mobility.
Bibliography Citation
Wilson, Alisa. A Documentation of Woman's Intersectorial and Occupational Mobility Using a Multidimensional Model of Economic Segmentation. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Southern California, 1984.