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Source: Work and Occupations
Resulting in 20 citations.
1. Alon, Sigal
Haberfeld, Yitchak
Labor Force Attachment and the Evolving Wage Gap Between White, Black, and Hispanic Young Women
Work and Occupations 34,4 (November 2007): 369-398.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/34/4/369.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Labor Force Participation; Racial Differences; Transition, School to Work; Wage Gap; Wages, Women; Women's Studies; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this article, the authors examine the role of labor force attachment (LFA) in shaping the diverging wage trajectories of White, Black, and Hispanic women daring their first postschooling decade. The authors take advantage of the longitudinal aspects of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth work history data by constructing detailed annual and cumulative measures of LFA and use them to examine women's wage profiles. The findings show constant racial and ethnic wage gaps among women with college education and a widening race gap among women with no college degree. The latter pattern emphasizes the importance of market-related processes in generating wage inequality among unskilled women. The authors document substantial racial and ethnic gaps within this group in the accumulation of LFA, especially immediately after the transition from school to work. This deficit in labor market experience plays a critical role in creating the diverse wage trajectories of White, Black, and Hispanic women with no college education. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Alon, Sigal and Yitchak Haberfeld. "Labor Force Attachment and the Evolving Wage Gap Between White, Black, and Hispanic Young Women." Work and Occupations 34,4 (November 2007): 369-398.
2. Charles, Maria
Buchmann, Marlis
Halebsky, Susan
Powers, Jeanne M.
Smith, Marisa M.
The Context of Women's Market Careers: A Cross-National Study
Work and Occupations Special Issue 28,3 (August 2001): 371-396.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/28/3/371.abstract
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Family Formation; Gender; Labor Force Participation; Maternal Employment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Compares determinants of labor force participation and occupational sex typing over a 20-year period for matched samples of American and Swiss ever-married women (aged late teens-late 30s) born between 1949-1951. The US data are drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women and the Swiss data are taken from a retrospective survey, "Berufsverlauf und Berufsidentitaet." Results indicate cross-national differences in processes governing women's market careers. These are in line with the authors' predictions regarding mediating effects of specific cultural, organizational, and institutional factors. Female labor force participation is more strongly influenced by family configuration in Switzerland than in the US. This can be attributed to powerful cultural and organizational constraints on maternal employment in Switzerland. In addition, the association between educational credentials and occupational sex typing is stronger and more persistent in Switzerland due probably to the greater differentiation and tighter market linkages of the Swiss educational system. Results suggest that the explanatory power of conventional individual-level models of female market behavior varies depending on the structural and normative conditions under which women make life choices. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2000 APA, all rights reserved).
Bibliography Citation
Charles, Maria, Marlis Buchmann, Susan Halebsky, Jeanne M. Powers and Marisa M. Smith. "The Context of Women's Market Careers: A Cross-National Study." Work and Occupations Special Issue 28,3 (August 2001): 371-396.
3. D'Amico, Ronald
Explaining the Effects of Capital Sector for Income Determination
Work and Occupations 9,4 (November 1982): 411-439.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/9/4/411.abstract
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Capital Sector; Dual Economic Theory; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Industrial Sector; Unions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article explicates some of the mechanisms whereby economic sector affects earnings. It estimates both direct and indirect sectoral effects, disaggregates the dependent variable into hourly wage and annual hours worked components and explores the interplay between sector and occupational distributions. The final section explores the extent to which capital sectors exhaust the relevance of industrial structure for earnings. The author finds that substantial interindustry variation in wages exists net of sector.
Bibliography Citation
D'Amico, Ronald. "Explaining the Effects of Capital Sector for Income Determination." Work and Occupations 9,4 (November 1982): 411-439.
4. D'Amico, Ronald
Industrial Feudalism Reconsidered: The Effects of Unionization on Labor Mobility
Work and Occupations 11,4 (November 1984): 407-437.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/11/4/407.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Blue-Collar Jobs; Employment; Mobility; Mobility, Job; Occupational Attainment; Unions; White Collar Jobs; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In recent years, sociologists have increasingly investigated the ways in which institutional or organizational features of the labor market constrain workers' mobility patterns throughout the economy. Building on this work, this article analyzes union effects on patterns of job mobility. It finds that the union effects vary by type of union and by type of job change, with industrial unions promoting the incidence of intrafirm occupation changes and craft unions decreasing the incidence of interoccupation moves. Apparently, unions operate to lend coherence and stability to careers by binding their members more closely to organizational and occupational structures.
Bibliography Citation
D'Amico, Ronald. "Industrial Feudalism Reconsidered: The Effects of Unionization on Labor Mobility." Work and Occupations 11,4 (November 1984): 407-437.
5. D'Amico, Ronald
The Effects of Career Origins on Subsequent Socioeconomic Attainments
Work and Occupations 12,3 (August 1985): 329-350.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/12/3/329.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Earnings; Occupational Attainment; Occupational Status; Transition, School to Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

An attempt is made to demonstrate that the institutional structures and environment of a worker's career origins shape opportunity structures and channel subsequent career developments. Specifically, the first job held after school is a particularly strong determinant of occupational placement and the earnings attainment of a worker late in his career. Data from the 1966 NLS of Young and Older Men are used to relate current earnings and occupational status to first-job characteristics. The findings indicate that the worker's first job does indeed strongly influence occupational attainments later in the career, but is less likely to be a strong predictor of earnings attainment. The survey also shows that the institutional effects on socioeconomic attainments are complex and not easily measured or explained. A study using firm-level attributes conducted over a longer period of time may reveal stronger effects of first job characteristics on workers' eventual attainment.
Bibliography Citation
D'Amico, Ronald. "The Effects of Career Origins on Subsequent Socioeconomic Attainments." Work and Occupations 12,3 (August 1985): 329-350.
6. Felmlee, Diane Helen
Causes and Consequences of Women's Employment Discontinuity, 1967-1973
Work and Occupations 22,2, (May 1995): 167-187.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/22/2/167.full.pdf+html
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Human Capital; Job Status; Marital Status; Mobility, Job; Mobility, Occupational; Occupational Attainment; Occupational Status; Unemployment; Unemployment Duration; Work Histories

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Analysis of work histories, 1967-1973, on a sample of young white women (N = 3,638) drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey finds support for the hypothesis that a single break in employment has immediate, adverse effects on occupational attainment. Job changes that were interrupted by an employment break yielded significantly lower gains in wages and job status than did uninterrupted job shifts and had relatively higher rates of downward job mobility. A critical factor was marital status, with married women having significantly higher rates of interrupted job mobility and significantly lower rates of uninterrupted job mobility. Structural explanations for the negative consequences of employment discontinuity are contrasted with a human capital explanation. 4 Tables, 36 References. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1995, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Felmlee, Diane Helen. "Causes and Consequences of Women's Employment Discontinuity, 1967-1973." Work and Occupations 22,2, (May 1995): 167-187.
7. Felmlee, Diane Helen
The Dynamics of Women's Job Mobility
Work and Occupations 11,3 (August 1984): 259-281.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/11/3/259.full.pdf+html
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Children; Husbands, Income; Marital Status; Mobility; Mobility, Job; Part-Time Work; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The job mobility of young white women is examined, using a continuous-time stochastic model. Analysis of NLS data on Young Women indicates that rates of women's job transitions within full-time employment are decreased by job rewards, socioeconomic status, and wages, and increased by IQ and age. A woman's education, however, does not have significant effects. The family constraints of being married and husband's income limit mobility. Shifts in and out of part-time employment are also common, and wages and young children are found to be significant factors in influencing changes to part-time jobs. Comparisons are made with previous findings for men.
Bibliography Citation
Felmlee, Diane Helen. "The Dynamics of Women's Job Mobility." Work and Occupations 11,3 (August 1984): 259-281.
8. Ganzach, Yoav
Intelligence, Education, and Facets of Job Satisfaction
Work and Occupations 30,1 (February 2003): 97-122.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/30/1/97.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Educational Aspirations/Expectations; I.Q.; Intelligence; Intelligence Tests; Job Characteristics; Job Satisfaction; Wage Rates

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The paper suggests that intelligence and education have differential effects on intrinsic job satisfaction and on pay satisfaction. Intelligence has a strong direct negative effect on intrinsic satisfaction, but a negligible effect on pay satisfaction, because it is positively associated with the level of desired job complexity, but not with the level of expected pay. On the other hand, education has a strong direct negative effect on pay satisfaction, but a small effect on intrinsic satisfaction, because it is positively associated with expected pay. These effects of intelligence and education are compared to their effects on global job satisfaction.
Bibliography Citation
Ganzach, Yoav. "Intelligence, Education, and Facets of Job Satisfaction." Work and Occupations 30,1 (February 2003): 97-122.
9. Glauber, Rebecca
Women’s Work and Working Conditions: Are Mothers Compensated for Lost Wages?
Work and Occupations 39,2 (May 2012):115-138.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/39/2/115.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Maternal Employment; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Motherhood; Occupational Choice; Occupations; Occupations, Female; Wage Gap; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Few studies have analyzed variation in the motherhood wage penalty by the sex composition of women’s jobs. This study draws on nationally representative data to investigate the motherhood wage penalty for women who work in female-dominated, male-dominated, and integrated jobs. Fixed-effects estimates reveal that women who work in female-dominated jobs pay a larger motherhood wage penalty than women who work in other jobs. This larger penalty is not offset by measurable compensating differentials, such as flexible scheduling or part-time work hours.
Bibliography Citation
Glauber, Rebecca. "Women’s Work and Working Conditions: Are Mothers Compensated for Lost Wages? ." Work and Occupations 39,2 (May 2012):115-138.
10. Knoke, David
Ishio, Yoshito
The Gender Gap in Company Job Training
Work and Occupations 25,2 (May 1998): 141-167.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/25/2/141.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Discrimination, Employer; Discrimination, Job; Event History; Gender Differences; Human Capital; Job Training; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Draws on data from the 1979-1991 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 6,111) to examine gender differences in employee participation in company-provided job training programs. Rather than closing the gender gap, the women's training disadvantage widened after controlling for theoretically important human capital, occupational, industrial, organizational, & family-stage variables. Further examination of women's & men's distributions on these independent variables & estimates of separate event-history equations suggest that gender segregation by occupation & industry, workweek length, & family-role obligations afford men better training opportunities than women. Suggestions are made for future research & speculations differed about the policy implications for closing the persistent gender gap in company-provided job training. 3 Tables, 1 Figure, 1 Appendix, 49 References. Adapted from the source document.
Bibliography Citation
Knoke, David and Yoshito Ishio. "The Gender Gap in Company Job Training." Work and Occupations 25,2 (May 1998): 141-167.
11. Levine, Phillip B.
Zimmerman, David J.
A Comparison of the Sex-Type of Occupational Aspirations and Subsequent Achievement
Work and Occupations 22,1 (February 1995): 73-84.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/22/1/73.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Modeling; Occupational Aspirations; Occupational Attainment; Occupational Choice; Occupations, Female; Occupations, Non-Traditional

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article further explores the connection between the sex-type of a girl's occupational aspirations and the sex-type of her subsequent occupation achieved in the labor market. The authors replicate previous work by Jerry Jacobs and build on it by using more recent data and an alternative methodology to address this issue. Two cohorts of data from the National Longitudinal Surveys are employed to estimate transition probability matrices between the sex-types of aspired occupations and the sex-types of achieved occupations. Then, multivariate models of the probability of entering a traditional (i.e., female-dominated) or nontraditional (i.e., male-dominated) occupation are estimated The authors find that Jacobs actually overestimated the relationship between aspirations and achievement and that this relationship has, in some ways, grown weaker over time.
Bibliography Citation
Levine, Phillip B. and David J. Zimmerman. "A Comparison of the Sex-Type of Occupational Aspirations and Subsequent Achievement." Work and Occupations 22,1 (February 1995): 73-84.
12. Maume, David J.
Wilson, George
Determinants of Declining Wage Mobility in the New Economy
Work and Occupations 42,1 (February 2015): 35-72.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/42/1/35.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Employment; Mobility; Part-Time Work; Wage Growth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study draws from the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Survey to compare patterns of wage mobility among the late boomer and millennial cohorts of young men. Estimating group-based trajectory models, the authors find that fewer men enjoyed rapid wage growth and more men fell into the steady and stagnant wage-trajectory groups. Furthermore, employment patterns in the new economy (e.g., changing employers, more part-time employment, and employment in low-end service occupations) increasingly determine the mobility rates of millennials compared with boomers and are stronger predictors of mobility chances in the millennial cohort than are family background and cognitive skills.
Bibliography Citation
Maume, David J. and George Wilson. "Determinants of Declining Wage Mobility in the New Economy." Work and Occupations 42,1 (February 2015): 35-72.
13. Miech, Richard A.
Eaton, William
Liang, Kung-Yee
Occupational Stratification over the Life Course
Work and Occupations 30,4 (November 2003): 440-474.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/30/4/440.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Demography; Ethnic Groups; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Hispanics; Life Course; Minorities; Minority Groups; Occupational Status; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses growth curve analysis to examine whether disparities in the occupational standing of White men relative to women and minorities grew larger or smaller with advancing age during the 1980s and 1990s. The analyses are based on The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Follow-Up. Results indicate that disparities in occupational standing stayed constant over the life course across all demographic groups except for African Americans, whose gap in occupational status relative to Whites and Hispanics grew significantly larger with advancing age. Implications of these findings for theories of occupational inequality are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Miech, Richard A., William Eaton and Kung-Yee Liang. "Occupational Stratification over the Life Course." Work and Occupations 30,4 (November 2003): 440-474.
14. Parcel, Toby L.
Nickoll, Rebecca A.
Dufur, Mikaela J.
The Effects of Parental Work and Maternal Nonemployment on Children's Reading and Math Achievement
Work and Occupations 23,4 (November 1996): 461-483.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/23/4/461.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birthweight; Child Health; Children, Academic Development; Cognitive Development; Education; Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

James Coleman's theory regarding family social capital and Mel Kohn's ideas regarding work and personality suggest that parental work may affect child cognition. Using a sample of 1,067 nine- to twelve-year-old children of working and non-working mothers from the 1992 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth's Child-Mother data set, it was found that the most important determinants of children's reading and math achievement were characteristics of the children and parents themselves. Paternal work hours had some effects on math achievement, and maternal work influenced reading achievement under some conditions. Policies allowing parents of either sex to schedule work flexibly may facilitate child cognitive achievement. Copyright Sage Publications Inc. 1996. Fulltext online. Photocopy available from ABI/INFORM.
Bibliography Citation
Parcel, Toby L., Rebecca A. Nickoll and Mikaela J. Dufur. "The Effects of Parental Work and Maternal Nonemployment on Children's Reading and Math Achievement." Work and Occupations 23,4 (November 1996): 461-483.
15. Reid, Lori Lynn
Devaluing Women and Minorities: The Effects of Race/Ethnic and Sex Composition of Occupations on Wage Levels
Work and Occupations 25,4 (November 1998): 511-536.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/25/4/511.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Comparable Worth; Ethnic Differences; Industrial Classification; Minorities; Occupations; Racial Differences; Racial Equality/Inequality; Wage Levels; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Are comparable worth policies an appropriate remedy for both race/ethnic and sex discrimination? The author's findings question whether similar processes of devaluation arc driving the sex and race/ethnic pay gap. The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth is used to assess the effects of both the sex and race/ethnic composition of occupations (defined by cross-classification of occupation and industry) on wage levels. The results indicate that the percentage of White women in an occupation has a negative effect of the wage levels of most groups. The percentage of Black women, Latina women, Black men, and Latino men do not have consistently negative effects on wage levels, even when testing for more geographically localized effects. It is concluded that occupational devaluation does not contribute to the race/ethnic gap in pay in a manner analogous to that found from occupations dominated by females. Thus, comparable worth policies are not likely to help reduce the race/ethnic gap in pay. COPYRIGHT 1998 Sage Publications Inc. Full-text available though OCLC to institutional members of OCLC. Your library may be a member of OCLC: http://www.oclc.org/oclc/menu/eco.htm.
Bibliography Citation
Reid, Lori Lynn. "Devaluing Women and Minorities: The Effects of Race/Ethnic and Sex Composition of Occupations on Wage Levels." Work and Occupations 25,4 (November 1998): 511-536.
16. Rexroat, Cynthia
Changes in the Employment Continuity of Succeeding Cohorts of Young Women
Work and Occupations 19,1 (February 1992): 18-34.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/19/1/18.abstract
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Employment; Labor Force Participation; Life Cycle Research; Women; Work Attachment; Work Histories

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A study examined employment continuity for three succeeding cohorts of women in their 20s who would be typically experiencing early life-cycle transitions to marriage and parenthood. Using the NLS of Young Women, women's work attachment was analyzed over 5-year periods during the 1970s. Two competing explanations were presented to account for the expected increase in women's employment continuity: (1) An increasing number of women have characteristics traditionally conducive to employment. (2) The employment behavior of those who have typically worked intermittently has increasingly resembled that of women who have typically worked more continuously. The results showed that the impact of behavioral change was far more significant than changes in women's characteristics. Traditional models of labor force participation should be respecified to account for the effects of social change. [ABI/INFORM]
Bibliography Citation
Rexroat, Cynthia. "Changes in the Employment Continuity of Succeeding Cohorts of Young Women." Work and Occupations 19,1 (February 1992): 18-34.
17. Shaw, Lois B.
Determinants of the Increasing Work Attachment of Married Women
Work and Occupations 12,1 (February 1985): 41-57.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/12/1/41.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Family Structure; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Unemployment; Wives; Work Attachment; Work Attitudes; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Between 1966 and 1976, the proportion of married women in their late thirties who exhibited a strong attachment to the labor force increased faster than the proportion with a weaker work attachment. This paper focuses on factors that have encouraged or prevented strong attachment. For white women, the most important factors contributing to the trend toward greater work attachment were: lessening family responsibilities, increases in their previous work experience, and changing attitudes toward women's roles; for black women, lessening family responsibilities, higher educational attainment and improved health were most important. Rising unemployment rates prevented still larger increases in strong attachment to the labor force than those that were observed. While the labor force participation of midlife married women may continue to increase in the future, it is possible that adverse economic conditions could promote intermittent work patterns rather than strong attachment.
Bibliography Citation
Shaw, Lois B. "Determinants of the Increasing Work Attachment of Married Women." Work and Occupations 12,1 (February 1985): 41-57.
18. Torre, Margarita
Stopgappers? The Occupational Trajectories of Men in Female-Dominated Occupations
Work and Occupations 45,3 (August 2018): 283-312.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0730888418780433
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Exits; Gender Differences; Occupations, Female; Occupations, Male; Occupations, Non-Traditional; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the determinants of men's exit from female-dominated occupations. Using census data and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data set, the author analyzes the job history of men employed in the United States between 1979 and 2006. Supporting the theoretical model, evidence indicates a group of stopgappers--men entering female-dominated occupations and leaving soon after their entry, thereby contributing to the perpetuation of segregation in female settings. By identifying the stopgapper occupational trajectory, this article contributes to the development of a comprehensive theory accounting for the way structural inequality is reproduced.
Bibliography Citation
Torre, Margarita. "Stopgappers? The Occupational Trajectories of Men in Female-Dominated Occupations." Work and Occupations 45,3 (August 2018): 283-312.
19. Wanner, Richard A.
Lewis, L. S.
Economic Segmentation and the Course of the Occupational Career
Work and Occupations 10,3 (August 1983): 307-324.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/10/3/307.abstract
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Dual Economic Theory; Education; Mobility; Occupations; Training

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The segmented labor market is studied to determine the difference of career paths of workers. Core industries are structured to maintain continuous production and skills acquisition. They have firm internal labor markets, unlike peripheral firms, which have low profit margins and high turnover. Using data from the NLS Older Men cohort, it is determined that the resources that have the greatest impact on the degree of status change in career development are the education and training variables. Core industries are found to be more upwardly mobile in the case of white or minority workers studied.
Bibliography Citation
Wanner, Richard A. and L. S. Lewis. "Economic Segmentation and the Course of the Occupational Career." Work and Occupations 10,3 (August 1983): 307-324.
20. Witkowski, Kristine M.
Leicht, Kevin T.
The Effects of Gender Segregation, Labor Force Participation, and Family Roles on the Earnings of Young Adult Workers
Work and Occupations 22,1 (February 1995): 48-72.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/22/1/48.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Earnings; Employment; Family Influences; Family Studies; Gender Differences; Labor Force Participation; Life Course; Male Sample; Occupational Choice; Occupational Segregation; Regions; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Assesses the effects of family role accumulation, earnings atrophy and occupational choice, occupational segregation, and statistical discrimination in relation to gender inequality in earnings among young adults. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979-1987, provide considerable support for the hypothesis that the effects of current labor force attachment, work experience, and occupational segregation are conditioned by family roles. The negative effects of women's representation within occupations are confined to married parents, although the results for women are consistent with social closure explanations, whereas the results for men are more consistent with status composition explanations of the effects of gender segregation. Analysis also reveals interesting differences in the effects of current and prior labor force attachment that are conditioned by gender and life-course group. The results point to the need for more research that studies the relations hip between labor force activity, occupational segregation, and family roles. 4 Tables, 1 Appendix, 52 References. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1995, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Witkowski, Kristine M. and Kevin T. Leicht. "The Effects of Gender Segregation, Labor Force Participation, and Family Roles on the Earnings of Young Adult Workers." Work and Occupations 22,1 (February 1995): 48-72.