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Source: Vanderbilt University
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Hearne, Brittany Nicole
The Effect of Parenting Styles and Depressive Symptoms on Young Adult's Educational Attainment
M.A. Thesis, Department of Sociology, Vanderbilt University, 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Vanderbilt University
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Educational Attainment; Parenting Skills/Styles; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this research, I consider whether the impact of parenting during middle and late adolescence is directly connected to educational attainment in young adulthood or whether the influence of parenting is better understood as indirectly affecting educational progress through mental health. Parenting styles are predominantly divided along two orthogonal dimensions in the relevant literature -- responsiveness/ supportiveness versus demanding/controlling (e.g., Maccoby and Martin 1983). These two dimensions are further divided into four categories-- uninvolved parenting, permissive parenting, authoritative parenting, and authoritarian parenting (e.g., Maccoby and Martin 1983; Baumrind 1991; Spera 2005), which are the types of parenting I consider. Variations in the characteristics of these four parenting styles are connected to whether youth perform well in school (Spera 2005).
Bibliography Citation
Hearne, Brittany Nicole. The Effect of Parenting Styles and Depressive Symptoms on Young Adult's Educational Attainment. M.A. Thesis, Department of Sociology, Vanderbilt University, 2015.
2. Tyndall, Benjamin D.
Neighborhood Perceptions and Well-being across the Early Life Course
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, Vanderbilt University, 2016
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Vanderbilt University
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Cohabitation; Depression (see also CESD); Discipline; Neighborhood Effects; Parent-Child Interaction; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Punishment, Corporal; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Disordered neighborhoods have been consistently linked with worse well-being for resident children compared to those who live in more advantaged neighborhoods. Though this finding is robust across studies, less is known about how neighborhood characteristics translate into poor psychosocial function in children and how these effects endure throughout childhood. In this paper, I examine one possible process linking disordered neighborhoods to child distress through neighborhood effects on maternal well-being and parent-child relationships. Using four waves of nationally representative parent and child data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth – 1979 and Child samples, I estimate structural equation models that suggest disordered neighborhoods increase child distress in several ways. First, disordered neighborhoods are associated with increased maternal distress which in turn is associated with increased mother child arguments. I also find that mothers in disordered neighborhoods punish their children more frequently. Increased mother-child arguments and punishments are both associated with higher levels of child distress across multiple waves of data. These findings demonstrate how structural inequalities at the neighborhood-level and the negative consequences they have for interpersonal relationships can create deleterious effects throughout childhood
Bibliography Citation
Tyndall, Benjamin D. Neighborhood Perceptions and Well-being across the Early Life Course. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, Vanderbilt University, 2016.