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Source: U.S. Department of Education
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Campbell, Paul B.
Mertens, Donna M.
Seitz, Patricia Ann
Cox, Sterling
Job Satisfaction--Antecedents and Associations
Report to the U.S. Department of Education, 1982
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Education
Keyword(s): Family Influences; High School Completion/Graduates; High School Curriculum; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Vocational Education

This study used data from the NLSY, integrated with the high school transcripts of a substantial proportion of those youth who had already graduated from high school, to consider the nature and the associations of job satisfaction for those who were employed. A factor analysis of those survey items that were intended to tap job satisfaction, together with other items having construct potential, identified four forms of job satisfaction: (1) personal on-the-job development; (2) working conditions; (3) job rewards; and (4) human interactions. These were related to vocational education, job characteristics, race and sex, hourly rate of pay, occupation, and motivation. Vocational education was found to be positively related to working conditions and, indirectly, to personal on-the-job development and job rewards. The largest factor in job satisfaction was occupation, which was usually, although not always, positive.
Bibliography Citation
Campbell, Paul B., Donna M. Mertens, Patricia Ann Seitz and Sterling Cox. "Job Satisfaction--Antecedents and Associations." Report to the U.S. Department of Education, 1982.
2. Green, Patricia L.
Hoogstra, Lisa A.
Ingels, Steven J.
Greene, Harrison N.
Marnell, Patricia K.
Formulating a Design for the ECLS: A Review of Longitudinal Studies
Working Paper No. 97-24, U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, Washington DC, August 1997
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLS General, NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Education
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; Canada, Canadian; Child Care; Child Health; Children; Cognitive Ability; Cross-national Analysis; Divorce; Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-B, ECLS-K); Family Background; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Longitudinal Data Sets; Longitudinal Surveys; Maternal Employment; Overview, Child Assessment Data; Parents, Single; Poverty; Self-Esteem

The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS) is a new study that will focus on children's early school experiences beginning with kindergarten. The ECLS is being developed under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), with additional financial and technical support provided by the Administration of Children, Youth, and Families, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs and Office of Indian Education, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food and Consumer Service. Approximately 23,000 children throughout the country will be selected to participate as they enter kindergarten and will be followed as they move from kindergarten through 5th grade. Base-year data will be collected in the fall of 1998, with additional spring follow-up data collections scheduled for 1999 through 2004. Information about children's neighborhoods, families, schools, and classrooms will be collected from parents, teachers, and school administrators. Because of the magnitude and complexity of the ECLS, NCES has set aside an extended period of time for planning, designing, and testing the instruments and procedures that will be used in the main study. NCES and its contractor, the National Opinion Research Center, are using this time to examine a variety of issues pertaining to the sampling and assessment of young children and their environments. The design phase of the study will culminate in a large-scale field test during the 1996-97 school year. NCES has sought the participation and input of many individuals and organizations throughout the design phase of the ECLS. The participation of these individuals and Organizations has resulted in a set of design papers that identify policy and research questions in early education, map the content of the ECLS study instruments to these questions, and explore and evaluate different methods for assessing the development of children and for capturing data about their homes, schools, and classrooms. This paper is one of several that were prepared in support of ECLS design efforts. The information on the studies described in this paper were current at the time the paper was written. We recognize that work on some of the studies has moved forward since that time. It is our hope that the information found in this paper not only will provide background for the development of the ECLS, but will be useful to researchers developing studies of young children and their educational experiences.
Bibliography Citation
Green, Patricia L., Lisa A. Hoogstra, Steven J. Ingels, Harrison N. Greene and Patricia K. Marnell. "Formulating a Design for the ECLS: A Review of Longitudinal Studies." Working Paper No. 97-24, U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, Washington DC, August 1997.
3. Phillips, Meredith
Understanding Ethnic Differences in Academic Achievement: Empirical Lessons from National Data
In: Analytic Issues in the Assessment of Student Achievement. D. Grissmer and M. Ross eds. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2000
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Education
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Economics of Discrimination; Genetics; High School and Beyond (HSB); Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY); National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP); National Education Longitudinal Survey (NELS); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Racial Differences; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Tests and Testing

In 1966, James Coleman published results from the first national study to describe ethnic differences in academic achievement among children of various ages. Since that time, we have made considerable progress in survey design, cognitive assessment, and data analysis. Yet we have not made much progress in understanding when ethnic differences in academic achievement arise, how these differences change with age, or why such changes occur. The purpose of this paper is to highlight several reasons why we have learned so little about these important issues over the past few decades. I begin by reviewing recent research on how the test score gap between African Americans and European Americans changes as children age. I then discuss several conceptual and methodological issues that have hindered our understanding of ethnic differences in academic achievement. ...For both the CNLSY and Prospects, I estimated growth models in which I predicted ethnic differences in students' initial test scores and learning rates.(A response to Phillips follows, starting on pg. 157: "Response: Two Studies of Academic Achievement," by Robert M. Hauser)
Bibliography Citation
Phillips, Meredith. "Understanding Ethnic Differences in Academic Achievement: Empirical Lessons from National Data" In: Analytic Issues in the Assessment of Student Achievement. D. Grissmer and M. Ross eds. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2000