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Source: Substance Use and Misuse
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Arkes, Jeremy
How Does Youth Cigarette Use Respond to Weak Economic Periods? Implications for the Current Economic Crisis
Substance Use and Misuse 47,4 (March 2012): 375-382.
Also: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/10826084.2011.631962
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Informa Healthcare
Keyword(s): Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Economic Changes/Recession; Modeling, Logit; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines whether youth cigarette use increases during weak economic periods (as do youth alcohol and drug use). The data come from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. With repeated measures over the 1997–2006 period, for almost 9,000 individuals, the samples include 30,000+ teenagers (15–19 years) and 30,000+ young adults (20–24 years). Logit models with state and year controls are estimated. The results indicate that teenagers and young adults increase cigarette use when the economy is weaker, implying that the current financial crisis has likely increased youth cigarette use relative to what it would have otherwise been.
Bibliography Citation
Arkes, Jeremy. "How Does Youth Cigarette Use Respond to Weak Economic Periods? Implications for the Current Economic Crisis." Substance Use and Misuse 47,4 (March 2012): 375-382.
2. Hughes, Tonda L.
Day, L. Edward
Marcantonio, Richard J.
Torpy, Edward
Gender Differences in Alcohol and Other Drug Use among Young Adults
Substance Use and Misuse 32,3 (January 1997): 317-342.
Also: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/10826089709055853
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Marcel Dekker
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Racial Differences; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article describes gender differences in alcohol and other drug (AOD) use and misuse in a representative sample of young women and men in the United States. Data were drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and focus on gender differences in prevalence and patterns of AOD use in African American, Hispanic, and White young adults ages 19 to 24 years old. Findings are summarized and implications for prevention are presented. (Copyright 1997 by Marcel Dekker, Inc.)
Bibliography Citation
Hughes, Tonda L., L. Edward Day, Richard J. Marcantonio and Edward Torpy. "Gender Differences in Alcohol and Other Drug Use among Young Adults." Substance Use and Misuse 32,3 (January 1997): 317-342.
3. Hughes, Tonda L.
Howard, Marion J.
Henry, David
Nurses' Use of Alcohol and Other Drugs: Findings from a National Probability Sample
Substance Use and Misuse 37,11 (January 2002): 1423-1440.
Also: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1081/JA-120014085
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Marcel Dekker
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Epidemiology; Health Care; Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examined the prevalence of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use among nurses (aged 19-26 yrs) in the 1984 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) using methods similar to those employed in a study comparing nurses and nonnurses from the 1980-1984 Epidemiological Catchment Area program (ECA). Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the degree to which AOD use was associated with occupation. Results indicating that substance use is unrelated to occupation lend support to earlier findings from the ECA. (PsycINFO Database Record © 2002 APA, all rights reserved
Bibliography Citation
Hughes, Tonda L., Marion J. Howard and David Henry. "Nurses' Use of Alcohol and Other Drugs: Findings from a National Probability Sample." Substance Use and Misuse 37,11 (January 2002): 1423-1440.
4. Jennison, Karen M.
Johnson, Kenneth A.
Resilience to Drinking Vulnerability in Women with Alcoholic Parents: The Moderating Effects of Dyadic Cohesion in Marital Communication
Substance Use and Misuse 32,11 (September 1997): 1461-1489.
Also: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/10826089709055873
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Marcel Dekker
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Marital Stability; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Influences; Resilience/Developmental Assets; Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from a subsample of women (N = 4,235) in two waves of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth (NLSY) are used to examine the relationship between parental alcoholism and alcohol use in adult life. Dyadic cohesion in marital communication (frequency of interaction and agreement on substantive issues that affect couples) is investigated as a resilience factor that could potentially mitigate adverse drinking outcomes in adult children of alcoholics (ACAs). A moderated mediation model is estimated using a Two-Stage Least Squares (2SLS) regression analysis. The results indicated that an imputed transmission of risk for drinking vulnerability in women ACAs, controlling for nonACA status, was effectively moderated by positive dyadic interaction. (AUTHOR)
Bibliography Citation
Jennison, Karen M. and Kenneth A. Johnson. "Resilience to Drinking Vulnerability in Women with Alcoholic Parents: The Moderating Effects of Dyadic Cohesion in Marital Communication." Substance Use and Misuse 32,11 (September 1997): 1461-1489.
5. Kandel, Denise B.
Davies, Mark
Cocaine Use in a National Sample of U.S. Youth (NLSY): Ethnic Patterns, Progression, and Predictors
Substance Use and Misuse 32,12-13 (January 1997): 1757-1762.
Also: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/10826089709035577
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Marcel Dekker
Keyword(s): Drug Use; Epidemiology; Ethnic Differences; Ethnic Studies; Hispanics; Racial Differences; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This chapter investigates patterns of cocaine use and selected risk factors for Whites, Blacks and Hispanics in 1984 in a national sample aged 19-27, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Three issues are examined: the prevalence of the use of cocaine and other drugs; the order of initiation into the use of cocaine and other illicit drugs; and the predictors of cocaine use among young adults.
Bibliography Citation
Kandel, Denise B. and Mark Davies. "Cocaine Use in a National Sample of U.S. Youth (NLSY): Ethnic Patterns, Progression, and Predictors." Substance Use and Misuse 32,12-13 (January 1997): 1757-1762.
6. Lo, Celia C.
Cheng, Tyrone C.
Onset Drinking: How It Is Related Both to Mother's Drinking and Mother-Child Relationships.
Substance Use and Misuse 45,6 (May 2010): 888-900.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Marcel Dekker
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Mothers, Behavior; Neighborhood Effects; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Risk-Taking

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Employing the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) as a sample of adolescents and their mothers, the present study connected the onset of adolescents' drinking to certain posited risk and protective factors characterizing their families. Via event history analysis and the discrete-time method, the data analysis involved more than 6,331 pair-interview-year units. The results show that both peer influences and mother's daily alcohol consumption enhance the risk that an adolescent aged between 10 and 14 years will begin drinking. At the same time, the quality of a mother's relationship with her child is an important posited protective factor delaying onset drinking.
Bibliography Citation
Lo, Celia C. and Tyrone C. Cheng. "Onset Drinking: How It Is Related Both to Mother's Drinking and Mother-Child Relationships." Substance Use and Misuse 45,6 (May 2010): 888-900.
7. Ryan, Andrea Kay
The Lasting Effects of Marijuana Use on Educational Attainment in Midlife
Substance Use and Misuse 45,4 (March 2010): 554-597.
Also: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/10826080802490238
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Marcel Dekker
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Drug Use; Educational Attainment; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the NLSY79, a U.S. nationally representative longitudinal survey of labor market behavior, sponsored and directed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor, was used to assess the influence of marijuana use on educational attainment (N = 7,724). Multivariate nested OLS models assessed the associations of marijuana use in 1979, 1984, and 1998 with educational attainment in 2002. Adolescent, frequent, and persistent users experienced lower attainment at ages 37 to 45 than nonusers even when use was confined to adolescence. Implications of the findings, limitations of the study, and suggestions for future research are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Ryan, Andrea Kay. "The Lasting Effects of Marijuana Use on Educational Attainment in Midlife." Substance Use and Misuse 45,4 (March 2010): 554-597.
8. Shillington, Audrey M.
Reed, Mark B.
Clapp, John D.
Woodruff, Susan I.
Testing the Length of Time Theory of Recall Decay: Examining Substance Use Report Stability With 10 Years of National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Data
Substance Use and Misuse 46,9 (July 2011):1105-1112.
Also: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/10826084.2010.548436
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Marcel Dekker
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Ethnic Differences; Modeling; Racial Differences; Self-Reporting; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Time Theory

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Aim:
This article examines whether the proportion of recanters increases (or decreases) as a function of time o [sic] test length of time theory. Sample: 2,221 US respondents in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth child data. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were used.
Results:
Among recanters, 50% of cigarette and alcohol users recanted use by 4 years, and 50% of marijuana users recanted by 3 years. Predictors of recanting was being Black or Hispanic and younger age. The theory was not supported. Further research is needed to identify potential reasons why adolescents recant their use is such a short time span. The study's limitations are noted.

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Bibliography Citation
Shillington, Audrey M., Mark B. Reed, John D. Clapp and Susan I. Woodruff. "Testing the Length of Time Theory of Recall Decay: Examining Substance Use Report Stability With 10 Years of National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Data." Substance Use and Misuse 46,9 (July 2011):1105-1112.