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Source: Statistics Canada
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Baker, Paula C.
Mott, Frank L.
Following Children Over Time: Child Development and Its Linkages with Family Social and Economic Transitions
Presented: Ottawa, ON, Statistics Canada Symposium on Design and Analysis of Longitudinal Surveys, 1992.
Also: http://www.nlsinfo.org/usersvc/Child-Young-Adult/BakerMott1992ChildrenOverTime.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Statistics Canada
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Behavioral Development; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Using data from the NLSY Child surveys, this paper explores how family poverty and maternal employment are linked to changes in childrens' cognitive and behavioral outcomes. The analyses employ a change score approach to first assess short-term changes in child outcomes between two successive data points (1986 to 1988 or 1988 to 1990) and levels family conditions in that interval, controlling for prior individual and family attributes. Results are then provided for a longer period over three survey points from 1986-1990 which suggest that cognitive and socioemotional change for children can vary, depending on the duration of time between base and end point as well as other factors such the child's race and maturational level.
Bibliography Citation
Baker, Paula C. and Frank L. Mott. "Following Children Over Time: Child Development and Its Linkages with Family Social and Economic Transitions." Presented: Ottawa, ON, Statistics Canada Symposium on Design and Analysis of Longitudinal Surveys, 1992.
2. Frenette, Marc
Is Post-secondary Access More Equitable in Canada or the United States?
Working Paper 11F0019MIE No. 244, Statistics Canada, March 2005.
Also: http://www.statcan.ca/english/research/11F0019MIE/11F0019MIE2005244.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Statistics Canada
Keyword(s): Family Background; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility, Social; Schooling, Post-secondary

This comparative study investigates the role of family background characteristics in post-secondary access in Canada and the United States. Given that post-secondary schooling is funded very differently in the two countries, family background may play substantively different roles. The findings suggest that university-going is less common among lower-income students and members of a visible minority group in the U.S. than among their Canadian counterparts. Some possible reasons are discussed. This comparative study investigates the role of family background characteristics in post-secondary access in Canada and the United States. Given that post-secondary schooling is funded very differently in the two countries, family background may play substantively different roles. The findings suggest that university-going is less common among lower-income students and members of a visible minority group in the U.S. than among their Canadian counterparts. Some possible reasons are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Frenette, Marc. "Is Post-secondary Access More Equitable in Canada or the United States?." Working Paper 11F0019MIE No. 244, Statistics Canada, March 2005.
3. Grawe, Nathan D.
Life Cycle Bias in the Estimation of Intergenerational Earnings Persistence
Report No. 207, Statistics Canada, August 2003.
Also: http://www.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/downpub/listpub.cgi?catno=11F0019MIE2003207
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: Statistics Canada
Keyword(s): Canada, Canadian; Canadian Intergenerational Income Data (IID); Cross-national Analysis; German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP); Germany, German; Mobility; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey, the German Socio-Economic Panel, the Canadian Intergenerational Income Data, and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics; this study finds a strong association between estimated intergenerational earnings elasticities and the age at which fathers and sons are observed. In all four data sets the age-elasticity relationship (which is positive for sons and negative for fathers) is especially strong among fathers; estimates are cut in half as the fathers' ages at observation increase by fewer than fifteen years. These effects are consistent with either increasing transitory earnings variance (and so greater attenuation bias) or increasing earnings variance over the life cycle predicted by the human capital investment models of Mincer and Ben-Porath. Furthermore, an examination of published estimates of intergenerational earnings elasticities shows that controls for the average age of fathers explain about one-third of the variance among estimates. These results impact our interpretation of empirical work which attempts to differentiate between the importance of parent income when children are young as opposed to when children are older, work which has been used to draw conclusions about credit constraints and early childhood education programs.
Bibliography Citation
Grawe, Nathan D. "Life Cycle Bias in the Estimation of Intergenerational Earnings Persistence." Report No. 207, Statistics Canada, August 2003.
4. Skuterud, Mikal
Explaining the Increase in On-the-job Search
Working Paper 11F0019MIE No. 250, Statistics Canada, April 2005.
Also: http://www.statcan.ca/english/research/11F0019MIE/11F0019MIE2005250.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Statistics Canada
Keyword(s): Canada, Canadian; Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS); Cross-national Analysis; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Job Search; Job Turnover; Labor Turnover; Wage Differentials

Evidence from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) reveals that the percentage of employed workers searching for other jobs more than doubled in Canada between 1976 and 1995. Comparable evidence from the Current Population Survey (CPS), Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), and National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) suggests that the U.S. experienced a remarkably similar upward trend in on-the-job search (OJS) over this period. Using U.S. data to supplement the Canadian data wherever possible, this paper attempts to explain this long-term, secular trend in Canadian OJS rates by performing decomposition and industry-level analyses, and by considering concomitant changes in employer-to-employer transition rates and the wage returns to job changing. The results from both countries suggest that an important part of the upward trend in OJS rates is not explained by compositional effects, including cohort effects. The OJS increase seems also to have occurred independently of rising job insecurity due to sector-specific demand shocks and trends in the dispersion of log wage residuals. The data are most consistent with a long-term decrease in search costs.
Bibliography Citation
Skuterud, Mikal. "Explaining the Increase in On-the-job Search." Working Paper 11F0019MIE No. 250, Statistics Canada, April 2005.