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Source: Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Alvarado, Steven Elias
The Complexities of Race and Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adult Incarceration for Whites, Blacks, and Latinos
Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World published online (1 June 2020): DOI: 10.1177/2378023120927154.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2378023120927154
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Geocoded Data; Incarceration/Jail; Neighborhood Effects; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The author uses restricted geocoded tract-level panel data (1986-2014) that span the prison boom and the acceleration of residential segregation in the United States from two cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979 and Children and Young Adults) to study whether the association between childhood neighborhood disadvantage and adult incarceration varies by race and ethnicity. Sibling fixed-effects models suggest that exposure to childhood neighborhood disadvantage increases the likelihood of incarceration in adulthood, net of observed and unobserved adjustments. However, the association appears weakest for blacks, especially black boys, compared with whites and Latinos. This suggests a more consistent likelihood of incarceration for blacks across all neighborhood origins. The author discusses potential theoretical explanations, including discrimination in profiling, policing, surveillance, and other prejudicial policies in the criminal justice system that are likely to uniquely affect blacks from all neighborhoods.
Bibliography Citation
Alvarado, Steven Elias. "The Complexities of Race and Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adult Incarceration for Whites, Blacks, and Latinos." Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World published online (1 June 2020): DOI: 10.1177/2378023120927154.
2. Branigan, Amelia R.
Freese, Jeremy
Sidney, Steven
Kiefe, Catarina I.
The Shifting Salience of Skin Color for Educational Attainment
Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World published online (19 December 2019): DOI: 10.1177/2378023119889829.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2378023119889829
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; Skin Tone

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Findings of an association between skin color and educational attainment have been fairly consistent among Americans born before the civil rights era, but little is known regarding the persistence of this relationship in later born cohorts. The authors ask whether the association between skin color and educational attainment has changed between black American baby boomers and millennials. The authors observe a large and statistically significant decline in the association between skin color and educational attainment between baby boomer and millennial black women, whereas the decline in this association between the two cohorts of black men is smaller and nonsignificant. Compared with baby boomers, a greater percentage of the association between skin color and educational attainment among black millennials appears to reflect educational disparities in previous generations. These results emphasize the need to conceptualize colorism as an intersectional problem and suggest caution when generalizing evidence of colorism in earlier cohorts to young adults today.
Bibliography Citation
Branigan, Amelia R., Jeremy Freese, Steven Sidney and Catarina I. Kiefe. "The Shifting Salience of Skin Color for Educational Attainment." Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World published online (19 December 2019): DOI: 10.1177/2378023119889829.