Search Results

Source: Sociology of Education
Resulting in 23 citations.
1. Angle, John
Wissmann, David A.
Gender, College Major, and Earnings
Sociology of Education 54,1 (January 1981): 25-33.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112510
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Discrimination, Sex; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Schooling, Post-secondary

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study tests the effect of a person's college major upon his or her hourly wage rate in order to see if the content learned in college explains the gap between the earnings of men and women. The results indicate that the direct effect of gender on the earnings of people with at least some college education is large and that controlling for field of study reduces the gap only slightly. In addition, the findings also show that young women's returns to a year of post-secondary education are higher than young men's, however, not enough to offset the negative effect of being female on earnings.
Bibliography Citation
Angle, John and David A. Wissmann. "Gender, College Major, and Earnings." Sociology of Education 54,1 (January 1981): 25-33.
2. Branigan, Amelia R.
(How) Does Obesity Harm Academic Performance? Stratification at the Intersection of Race, Sex, and Body Size in Elementary and High School
Sociology of Education 90,1 (January 2017): 25-46.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0038040716680271
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Body weight; Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study; Gender Differences; Obesity; Racial Differences; School Performance

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this study I hypothesize a larger penalty of obesity on teacher-assessed academic performance for white girls in English, where femininity is privileged, than in math, where stereotypical femininity is perceived to be a detriment. This pattern of associations would be expected if obesity largely influences academic performance through social pathways, such as discrimination and stigma. In the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (age ~9) and the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997 (age ~18), I find obesity to be associated with a penalty on academic performance among white girls in English but not in math, while no association is found in either subject for white boys or for black students net of controls. Findings suggest that the relationship between obesity and academic performance may result largely from how educational institutions interact differently with bodies of different sizes rather than primarily via constraints on physical health.
Bibliography Citation
Branigan, Amelia R. "(How) Does Obesity Harm Academic Performance? Stratification at the Intersection of Race, Sex, and Body Size in Elementary and High School." Sociology of Education 90,1 (January 2017): 25-46.
3. Carr, Rhoda Viellion
Wright, James D.
Brody, Charles J.
Effects of High School Work Experience a Decade Later: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey
Sociology of Education 69,1 (January 1996): 66-81.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112724
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Educational Attainment; Employment, In-School; Employment, Youth; High School Completion/Graduates; Income Level; Job Status; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Outcomes; Unions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Reports data from the 1979-1991 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for a sample of 2,716 young people (ages 16-19 when first surveyed) on the effects of working while in high school on educational attainments & a variety of labor force outcomes roughly a decade after high school completion. Previous studies focused on short-term consequences & reported mixed & contradictory results. Here, results suggest moderately negative long-term effects on educational attainment in that working youths are less likely to attend or to complete 4+ years of college. However, working during high school has a positive effect on a variety of labor force outcomes (labor force participation, employment status, & income) even a decade later, despite the small educational decrement that working youths suffer. It is concluded that, a decade later, labor force & income gains somewhat offset the educational decrements that are related to working while in high school. 5 Tables, 21 References. Adap ted from the source document. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Carr, Rhoda Viellion, James D. Wright and Charles J. Brody. "Effects of High School Work Experience a Decade Later: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey." Sociology of Education 69,1 (January 1996): 66-81.
4. Coleman, J. S.
Hoffer, T.
Response to Teuber-James, Cain-Goldberger and Morgan
Sociology of Education 56,4 (October 1983): 219-234.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112552
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Longitudinal Surveys; Research Methodology

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Coleman and Hoffer critique Morgan's analysis of private school effects. They suggest that Morgan's findings are inconclusive because of his failure to weight the data, because of his small and unrepresentative sample of private school youth, and because of a misspecification in his theoretical model.
Bibliography Citation
Coleman, J. S. and T. Hoffer. "Response to Teuber-James, Cain-Goldberger and Morgan." Sociology of Education 56,4 (October 1983): 219-234.
5. D'Amico, Ronald
Does Employment During High School Impair Academic Progress?
Sociology of Education 57,3 (July 1984): 152-164.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112599
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Employment, Youth; High School; Part-Time Work; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The extent of high school employment is documented and its relationship to study time, free time spent at school, class rank, knowledge of occupational tasks, and the probability of dropping out before completing high school is evaluated. Results show that more extensive work involvement is associated with decreased study time and decreased free time at school for some race/sex groups, but no effects on class rank are uncovered. Very extensive work involvement of white male sophomores and white female juniors is associated with an increase in their rate of dropping out, but less intensive work involvement of those of most race/sex groups in grade 11 actually appears to lead to increased rates of high school completion. That high school employment may foster high school achievement is explained by a congruence hypothesis, which holds that a correspondence exists between the personality traits promoted and rewarded by employers and those traits promoted and rewarded by teachers.
Bibliography Citation
D'Amico, Ronald. "Does Employment During High School Impair Academic Progress?" Sociology of Education 57,3 (July 1984): 152-164.
6. Domina, Thurston
Leveling the Home Advantage: Assessing the Effectiveness of Parental Involvement in Elementary School
Sociology of Education 78,3 (July 2005): 233-249.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4148916
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Academic Development; Elementary School Students; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parent-School involvement; Parental Influences; Parental Investments; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In the past two decades, a great deal of energy has been dedicated to improving children's education by increasing parents' involvement in school. However, the evidence on the effectiveness of parental involvement is uneven. Whereas policy makers and theorists have assumed that parental involvement has wide-ranging positive consequences, many studies have shown that it is negatively associated with some children's outcomes. This article uses data from the children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 to estimate time-lagged growth models of the effect of several types of parental involvement on scores on elementary school achievement tests and the Behavioral Problems Index. The findings suggest that parental involvement does not independently improve children's learning, but some involvement activities do prevent behavioral problems. Interaction analyses suggest that the involvement of parents with low socioeconomic status may be more effective than that of parents with high socioeconomic status. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Domina, Thurston. "Leveling the Home Advantage: Assessing the Effectiveness of Parental Involvement in Elementary School." Sociology of Education 78,3 (July 2005): 233-249.
7. Doren, Catherine
Grodsky, Eric
What Skills Can Buy: Transmission of Advantage through Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills
Sociology of Education 89,4 (October 2016): 321-342.
Also: http://soe.sagepub.com/content/89/4/321.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Cognitive Ability; College Characteristics; College Degree; College Enrollment; Family Income; Grade Point Average (GPA)/Grades; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Noncognitive Skills; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Parental income and wealth contribute to children's success but are at least partly endogenous to parents' cognitive and noncognitive skills. We estimate the degree to which mothers' skills measured in early adulthood confound the relationship between their economic resources and their children's postsecondary education outcomes. Analyses of National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 suggest that maternal cognitive and noncognitive skills attenuate half of parental income's association with child baccalaureate college attendance, a fifth of its association with elite college attendance, and a quarter of its association with bachelor's degree completion. Maternal skills likewise attenuate a third of parental wealth's association with children's baccalaureate college attendance, half of its association with elite college attendance, and a fifth of its association with bachelor's degree completion. Observational studies of the relationship between parents' economic resources and children's postsecondary attainments that fail to account for parental skills risk seriously overstating the benefits of parental income and wealth.
Bibliography Citation
Doren, Catherine and Eric Grodsky. "What Skills Can Buy: Transmission of Advantage through Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills." Sociology of Education 89,4 (October 2016): 321-342.
8. Duke, Naomi
Macmillan, Ross
Schooling, Skills, and Self-rated Health: A Test of Conventional Wisdom on the Relationship between Educational Attainment and Health
Sociology of Education 89,3 (July 2016): 171-206.
Also: http://soe.sagepub.com/content/89/3/171
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Cognitive Ability; Educational Attainment; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Heterogeneity; Noncognitive Skills

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Education is a key sociological variable in the explanation of health and health disparities. Conventional wisdom emphasizes a life course--human capital perspective with expectations of causal effects that are quasi-linear, large in magnitude for high levels of educational attainment, and reasonably robust in the face of measured and unmeasured explanatory factors. We challenge this wisdom by offering an alternative theoretical account and an empirical investigation organized around the role of measured and unmeasured cognitive and noncognitive skills as confounders in the association between educational attainment and health. Based on longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1997 spanning mid-adolescence through early adulthood, results indicate that (1) effects of educational attainment are vulnerable to issues of omitted variable bias, (2) measured indicators of cognitive and noncognitive skills account for a significant proportion of the traditionally observed effect of educational attainment, (3) such skills have effects larger than that of even the highest levels of educational attainment when appropriate controls for unmeasured heterogeneity are incorporated, and (4) models that most stringently control for such time-stable abilities show little evidence of a substantive association between educational attainment and health.
Bibliography Citation
Duke, Naomi and Ross Macmillan. "Schooling, Skills, and Self-rated Health: A Test of Conventional Wisdom on the Relationship between Educational Attainment and Health." Sociology of Education 89,3 (July 2016): 171-206.
9. Felmlee, Diane Helen
Returning to School and Women's Educational Attainment
Sociology of Education 61,1 (January 1988): 29-41.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112307
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Returns; Occupational Attainment; Schooling; Wage Levels; Women; Women's Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Over the past twenty-five years, more and more United States women have been returning to school after a period of employment in the labor force. Factors that make it likely that women will leave the labor force to obtain more schooling, and whether this increase in education significantly improves their wage levels and job prestige when they return to work are investigated using employment history data from the NLS of Young Women, 1968-1973, (number of cases = 3,638 white and 1,459 black respondents aged 14-24). The results of the initial analysis reveal that job rewards are an important influence on women's rates of returning to school. In addition, regression analyses demonstrate that women's return to school yields modest wage increases and increased occupational prestige (with certain exceptions) in subsequent jobs. Women who return to school are also more likely to improve the occupational category of their job, although usually they remain employed in gender-typical occupations. In general, additional schooling benefits women's occupational attainment, but, perhaps because of structural barriers, there are limitations to these benefits. [Sociological Abstracts, Inc.]
Bibliography Citation
Felmlee, Diane Helen. "Returning to School and Women's Educational Attainment." Sociology of Education 61,1 (January 1988): 29-41.
10. Hardy, Melissa A.
Effects of Education on Retirement Among White Male Wage-and-Salary Workers
Sociology of Education 57,2 (April 1984): 84-98.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112631
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior; Educational Attainment; Exits; Occupational Status; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Education is generally recognized as a major determinant of occupational status, and its effect on career-entry positions as well as on subsequent locations within the occupational structure has been well documented in the status attainment literature. Using the more recent waves of the NLS of Older Men, this study focuses on labor force exits and examines the effect of education on retirement behavior. Results from a series of logistic estimations indicate that the net direct effect of educational attainment on the transition to a "retired" status primarily consists of discrete effects located within non-manual occupational categories. Having acquired a college degree reduces the likelihood of retirement among professional, technical, and kindred workers, and the presence of a high school diploma makes retirement less likely for sales and possibly clerical workers.
Bibliography Citation
Hardy, Melissa A. "Effects of Education on Retirement Among White Male Wage-and-Salary Workers." Sociology of Education 57,2 (April 1984): 84-98.
11. Houle, Jason N.
Disparities in Debt: Parents’ Socioeconomic Resources and Young Adult Student Loan Debt
Sociology of Education 87,1 (January 2014): 53-69.
Also: http://soe.sagepub.com/content/87/1/53
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): College Cost; Debt/Borrowing; Education; Financial Assistance; Income; Parental Influences; Socioeconomic Background; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In an era of rising college costs and stagnant grant-based student aid, many young adults rely on their parents’ resources and student loans to pay for their postsecondary education. In this study I ask how parents’ income and education are linked to young adults’ student loan debt. I develop and test two perspectives regarding the functional form of the association between parents’ income, parents’ education, and student loan debt. I have four key findings. First, the relationship between parents’ income and student loan debt is nonlinear, such that young adults from middle-income families have a higher risk for debt than do those from low- and high-income families. Second, young adults from college-educated and high-income families are relatively protected from debt. Third, the association between parents’ socioeconomic status (SES) and debt is modified by postsecondary institutional characteristics and is strongest at private and high-cost institutions. Finally, the effect of parents’ SES on debt varies across the debt distribution. Parents’ SES is strongly predictive of entry into debt, but there are few differences conditional on going into debt. This suggests that socioeconomic disparities in debt are primarily driven by the probability of going into debt rather than differences among debtors. However, compared to their more advantaged counterparts, young adults from low-SES backgrounds have a higher risk of accruing debt burdens that exceed the national average.
Bibliography Citation
Houle, Jason N. "Disparities in Debt: Parents’ Socioeconomic Resources and Young Adult Student Loan Debt." Sociology of Education 87,1 (January 2014): 53-69.
12. Houle, Jason N.
Warner, Cody
Into the Red and Back to the Nest? Student Debt, College Completion, and Returning to the Parental Home among Young Adults
Sociology of Education 90,1 (January 2017): 89-108.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0038040716685873
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): College Cost; College Degree; Debt/Borrowing; Racial Differences; Residence, Return to Parental Home/Delayed Homeleaving; Student Loans; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Rising student debt has sparked concerns about its impact on the transition to adulthood. In this paper, we examine the claim that student debt is leading to a rise in ‘"boomeranging," or returning home, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 Cohort and discrete time-event history models. We have four findings. First, student loan debt is not associated with boomeranging in the complete sample. However, we find that the association differs by race, such that the link between student debt and returning home is stronger for black than for white youth. Third, degree completion is a strong predictor of returning home, whereby those who fail to attain a degree have an increased risk of boomeranging. Fourth, young adult role transitions and socioeconomic well-being are associated with boomeranging. Findings suggest that rising debt has created new risks and may reproduce social inequalities in the transition to adulthood.
Bibliography Citation
Houle, Jason N. and Cody Warner. "Into the Red and Back to the Nest? Student Debt, College Completion, and Returning to the Parental Home among Young Adults." Sociology of Education 90,1 (January 2017): 89-108.
13. Jaeger, Mads Meier
Does Cultural Capital Really Affect Academic Achievement? New Evidence from Combined Sibling and Panel Data
Sociology of Education 84,4 (October 2011): 281-298.
Also: http://soe.sagepub.com/content/84/4/281.full
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Children, Academic Development; Extracurricular Activities/Sports; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Modeling, Fixed Effects; Parental Influences; Parental Investments; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Siblings; Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article provides new estimates of the causal effect of cultural capital on academic achievement. The author analyzes data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth–Children and Young Adults and uses a fixed effect design to address the problem of omitted variable bias, which has resulted in too optimistic results in previous research. After controlling for family and individual fixed effects, the author reports that (1) six indicators of cultural capital have mostly positive direct effects on children’s reading and math test scores, (2) the effect of cultural capital is smaller than previously reported, and (3) the effect of cultural capital varies in high and low socioeconomic status (SES) environments. Results mostly support cultural reproduction theory (cultural capital more important in high SES environments) for cultural capital indicators capturing familiarity with legitimate culture and mostly support cultural mobility theory (cultural capital more important in low SES environments) for indicators capturing “concerted cultivation.”
Bibliography Citation
Jaeger, Mads Meier. "Does Cultural Capital Really Affect Academic Achievement? New Evidence from Combined Sibling and Panel Data." Sociology of Education 84,4 (October 2011): 281-298.
14. Mensch, Barbara S.
Kandel, Denise B.
Dropping Out of High School and Drug Involvement
Sociology of Education 61,2 (April 1988): 95-113.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112267
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Drug Use; Event History; GED/General Educational Diploma/General Equivalency Degree/General Educational Development

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The relationship between dropping out of high school and substance use is explored using the NLSY, a national longitudinal sample of young Americans aged 19-27 in 1984. Cross-sectional data indicate that high school dropouts are more involved with cigarettes and illicit drugs than graduates, and those who go on to obtain a GED are the most intensely involved. Event history analysis indicates that, controlling for other important risk factors, prior use of cigarettes, marijuana and other illicit drugs increases the propensity of dropping out and that the earlier the initiation into drugs, the greater the probability of premature school leaving. Preventing or at least delaying initiation of drug use will reduce the incidence of dropping out in our nation's high schools.
Bibliography Citation
Mensch, Barbara S. and Denise B. Kandel. "Dropping Out of High School and Drug Involvement." Sociology of Education 61,2 (April 1988): 95-113.
15. Merry, Joseph
Tracing the U.S. Deficit in PISA Reading Skills to Early Childhood: Evidence from the United States and Canada
Sociology of Education 86,3 (July 2013): 234-252.
Also: http://soe.sagepub.com/content/86/3/234
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY); Cognitive Ability; Cross-national Analysis; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Why does the United States lag behind so many other countries on international education assessments? The traditional view targets school-based explanations—U.S. schools attract poorer teachers and lack the proper incentives. But the U.S. educational system may also serve children with comparatively greater academic challenges as a result of poorer social conditions. One way of gaining leverage on this issue is to understand when U.S. students fall behind their international counterparts. I first compare reading/vocabulary test scores for U.S. and Canadian children (ages 4-5) using National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1979–Children and Youth (NLSY79) and Canada’s National Longitudinal Study of Children and Youth (NLSCY). I then compare the magnitude of these differences to similar cohorts of students at ages 15 to 16 using data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). Findings indicate that while the Canadian advantage in PISA is substantial (0.30 standard deviation units), this advantage already existed at ages 4 to 5, before formal schooling had a chance to matter. I discuss the implications of this pattern for interpreting international test score rankings.
Bibliography Citation
Merry, Joseph. "Tracing the U.S. Deficit in PISA Reading Skills to Early Childhood: Evidence from the United States and Canada." Sociology of Education 86,3 (July 2013): 234-252.
16. Monaghan, David B.
Does College Enrollment and Bachelor's Completion by Mothers Impact Children's Educational Outcomes?
Sociology of Education 90,1 (January 2017): 3-24.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0038040716681054
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): College Degree; College Enrollment; Education, Adult; Educational Attainment; Educational Outcomes; Mothers, Education; Parental Influences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Today, many undergraduates are themselves raising children. But does college-going by parents improve their offspring's educational attainment? I address this question using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1979 and linked Children and Young Adults Survey. I first model postnatal college enrollment and bachelor's completion by mothers and use predicted probabilities to minimize selection bias through inverse probability of treatment weighting. I then estimate the impact of maternal college enrollment and attainment on offspring's likelihood of graduating from high school, enrolling in college, and completing a four-year degree. I find sizeable effects of maternal college completion on all outcomes, but the impact of maternal enrollment without completion is considerably muted. I review implications for sociological research and policies to assist nontraditional students.
Bibliography Citation
Monaghan, David B. "Does College Enrollment and Bachelor's Completion by Mothers Impact Children's Educational Outcomes?" Sociology of Education 90,1 (January 2017): 3-24.
17. Morgan, William R.
Learning and Student Life Quality of Public and Private School Youth
Sociology of Education 56,4 (October 1983): 187-202.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112548
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Education, Guidance and Counseling; Educational Attainment; Family Background; High School Curriculum; Hispanics; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Private Schools; Schooling; Vocational Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Conclusions from the 1981 public-private schooling report of Coleman, Hoffer and Kilgore are mostly not supported using data from the NLSY. With the exception of a slight gain in verbal achievement for Hispanics in private schools, and a slight gain in vocational achievement for white students in public schools, the sectors do not differ in the amount of learning produced, once the appropriate background and curriculum controls are introduced. Attending Catholic school does slightly raise expected educational attainments. Consistent sector differences do appear in the rated quality of student life--instructional quality, discipline, safety, and peer relations are rated higher in private schools, while learning freedom and job counseling opportunities are rated higher in public schools. The discussion emphasizes the crucial difference between learning and quality of student life as criteria for making policy recommendations.
Bibliography Citation
Morgan, William R. "Learning and Student Life Quality of Public and Private School Youth." Sociology of Education 56,4 (October 1983): 187-202.
18. Morgan, William R.
The Analysis of NLS Youth in Public and Private Schools: Response to Coleman and Hoffer
Sociology of Education 57,2 (April 1984): 122-128.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112634
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Private Schools; Research Methodology

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Morgan responds to Coleman and Hoffer's critique of his analysis. Contrary to their claims, his analysis used weighted data from a fully representative sample of adequate size. Moreover, the model specification Coleman and Hoffer advocated was in fact estimated and reported in the article. Additional information on the NLSY is reported for the sake of educational researchers considering use of the data.
Bibliography Citation
Morgan, William R. "The Analysis of NLS Youth in Public and Private Schools: Response to Coleman and Hoffer." Sociology of Education 57,2 (April 1984): 122-128.
19. Orr, Amy J.
Black-White Differences in Achievement: The Importance of Wealth
Sociology of Education 76,4 (October 2003): 281-304.
Also: http://professorreed.com/Orr_-E-_Black-White_Diffs_in_Acievement__the_importance_of_wealth.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Achievement; Assets; Children, Academic Development; Family Income; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Racial Differences; Social Capital; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this article, the author argues that wealth, which is an indicator of both financial and human capital, can affect academic achievement, as well as help to explain the gap in black-white test scores. Analyses reveal that wealth affects achievement through its effect on the amount of cultural capital to which a child is exposed. Because blacks have substantially less wealth than do whites, wealth can help to explain a portion of the racial achievement gap. The implications of the findings are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Orr, Amy J. "Black-White Differences in Achievement: The Importance of Wealth ." Sociology of Education 76,4 (October 2003): 281-304.
20. Owens, Jayanti
Early Childhood Behavior Problems and the Gender Gap in Educational Attainment in the United States
Sociology of Education 89,3 (July 2016): 236-258.
Also: http://soe.sagepub.com/content/89/3/236.full
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; High School Completion/Graduates; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); School Characteristics/Rating/Safety

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Why do men in the United States today complete less schooling than women? One reason may be gender differences in early self-regulation and prosocial behaviors. Scholars have found that boys' early behavioral disadvantage predicts their lower average academic achievement during elementary school. In this study, I examine longer-term effects: Do these early behavioral differences predict boys' lower rates of high school graduation, college enrollment and graduation, and fewer years of schooling completed in adulthood? If so, through what pathways are they linked? I leverage a nationally representative sample of children born in the 1980s to women in their early to mid-20s and followed into adulthood. I use decomposition and path analytic tools to show that boys' higher average levels of behavior problems at age 4 to 5 years help explain the current gender gap in schooling by age 26 to 29, controlling for other observed early childhood factors. In addition, I find that early behavior problems predict outcomes more for boys than for girls. Early behavior problems matter for adult educational attainment because they tend to predict later behavior problems and lower achievement.
Bibliography Citation
Owens, Jayanti. "Early Childhood Behavior Problems and the Gender Gap in Educational Attainment in the United States." Sociology of Education 89,3 (July 2016): 236-258.
21. Plank, Stephen B.
High School Dropout and the Role of Career and Technical Education: A Survival Analysis of Surviving High School
Sociology of Education 81,4 (October 2008): 345-370.
Also: http://soe.sagepub.com/content/81/4/345.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Academic Development; High School Curriculum; High School Dropouts; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Vocational Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to investigate high school dropout and its association with the high school curriculum. In particular, it examines how combinations of career and technical education (CTE) and core academic courses influence the likelihood of leaving school. Hazards models indicate a significant curvilinear association between the CTE-to-academic course-taking ratio and the risk of dropping out for youths who were aged 14 and younger when they entered the ninth grade (not old for grade). This finding suggests that a middle-range mix of exposure to CTE and an academic curriculum can strengthen a student's attachment to or motivation while in school. The same association was not found between course taking and the likelihood of dropping out for youths who were aged 15 or older when they entered high school, thus prompting further consideration of the situation of being old for grade in school settings that remain highly age graded in their organization.
Bibliography Citation
Plank, Stephen B. "High School Dropout and the Role of Career and Technical Education: A Survival Analysis of Surviving High School." Sociology of Education 81,4 (October 2008): 345-370.
22. Teachman, Jay D.
Military Service and Educational Attainment in the All-Volunteer Era
Sociology of Education 80,4 (October 2007): 359-374.
Also: http://soe.sagepub.com/content/80/4/359.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): All-Volunteer Force (AVF); Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Educational Attainment; Military Recruitment; Military Service; Racial Studies; Veterans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine the relationship between service in the All Volunteer Force (AVF) military and educational attainment. Through the use of fixed-effects estimators, the author generated estimates of the effect of military service on the highest grade of school completed by men that are purged of the confounding effects of constant unmeasured household-specific and person-specific variables. He also implemented another series of controls for selectivity involving potential time-varying factors by comparing active-duty veterans to reserve-duty veterans and nonveterans who at some time indicated their intentions to enter the military. The results indicate that there is considerable diversity in the effect of military service among veterans according to such variables as education prior to service, score on the Armed Forces Qualification Test, branch of service, length of service, age at entry into the military, and race. Overall, however, veterans of the AVF receive less education than their civilian counterparts, and this educational gap tends to grow over time. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Teachman, Jay D. "Military Service and Educational Attainment in the All-Volunteer Era." Sociology of Education 80,4 (October 2007): 359-374.
23. Teachman, Jay D.
Military Service in the Vietnam Era and Educational Attainment
Sociology of Education 78,1 (January 2005): 50-68.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4148910
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Education; Educational Attainment; Military Service; Schooling; Veterans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Study of Young Men for 1966-81, this study examined the effect of military service on the highest grade of schooling completed. Fixed-effects estimators were used to generate estimates of the effect of military service on the schooling trajectories of veterans and nonveterans that are independent of unmeasured household-specific and person-specific factors that may bias the relationship. The results indicate that veterans educational profiles differ from those of nonveterans. The veteran-nonveteran difference in schooling is substantial at the time veterans are discharged from the military (on average, a deficit of about one year) but diminishes thereafter (on average, to about a half year). The results also indicate that the effect of veteran status varies according to draft status, schooling prior to military service, and age at entry into the military but not race.
Bibliography Citation
Teachman, Jay D. "Military Service in the Vietnam Era and Educational Attainment." Sociology of Education 78,1 (January 2005): 50-68.