Search Results

Source: Social Service Review
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. Berger, Lawrence Marc
Socioeconomic Factors and Substandard Parenting
Social Service Review 81,3 (September 2007): 485-522.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/10.1086/520963
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Income; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Parenthood; Parents, Single; Work Hours

This article uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to estimate the independent and interactive effects of income, family structure, and maternal work on measures of substandard parenting. Results from child fixed-effects analyses suggest that children in mother-partner families are more likely to be exposed to substandard parenting than children in mother-father families. However, income plays a particularly strong protective role in regard to substandard parenting in mother-partner families, such that parenting improves as income rises. Increases in maternal work hours are associated with increases in substandard parenting for children in single-mother families. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Social Service Review is the property of University of Chicago Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Berger, Lawrence Marc. "Socioeconomic Factors and Substandard Parenting." Social Service Review 81,3 (September 2007): 485-522.
2. Berzin, Stephanie Cosner
Difficulties in the Transition to Adulthood: Using Propensity Scoring to Understand What Makes Foster Youth Vulnerable
Social Service Review 82,2 (June 2008): 171-196.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/10.1086/588417
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Foster Care; Propensity Scores; Transition, Adulthood

Research indicates that foster youth approaching adulthood fare poorly on a number of economic and social outcomes. Little is known, however, about whether negative outcomes stem from foster care or risk factors common among youth who have foster care experience. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 and eight distinct matching schemes, this study compares outcomes of foster youth (n = 136) to those of other youth. These schemes are based on propensity scoring and Mahalanobis matching. Results locate similar outcomes for foster youth and youth matched on preplacement characteristics. Foster youth have more problematic outcomes than do youth in the general sample that is not matched. The results suggest that risk factors, and not foster care itself, contribute to difficulties that occur in the transition to adulthood. These findings must be cautiously interpreted in light of study limitations. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Social Service Review is the property of University of Chicago Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Berzin, Stephanie Cosner. "Difficulties in the Transition to Adulthood: Using Propensity Scoring to Understand What Makes Foster Youth Vulnerable." Social Service Review 82,2 (June 2008): 171-196.
3. Cheng, Tyrone C.
McElderry, Cathy Gilbert
How Do Drug Use and Social Relations Affect Welfare Participation?
Social Service Review 81,1 (March 2007): 155-165.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/10.1086/510803
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Drug Use; Marital Status; Religious Influences; Welfare

This study analyzes whether welfare use is longitudinally related to drug use and various measures of social relations. It conducts secondary analyses on data from a sample of 382 women. The data' which stem from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, were gathered between 1984 and 2002. The results suggest that use of marijuana or cocaine does not affect women's welfare participation to a statistically significant degree. Attending religious services and receiving low levels of child support are associated with statistically significant declines in welfare participation. Changes in marital status are linked to increases in welfare participation. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Social Service Review is the property of University of Chicago Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Cheng, Tyrone C. and Cathy Gilbert McElderry. "How Do Drug Use and Social Relations Affect Welfare Participation?" Social Service Review 81,1 (March 2007): 155-165.
4. Dolinsky, Arthur Lewis
Caputo, Richard K.
O'Kane, Patrick
Competing Effects of Culture and Situation on Welfare Receipt
Social Service Review 63,3 (September 1989): 359-371.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30012031
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Education; Mothers and Daughters; Welfare; Work Experience

Contributing to the long-standing debate about the relative influence of cultural and situational factors on welfare receipt, examined here are the competing effects of these factors. Analysis of microdata from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience for a subset of 549 matched mother-daughter pairs (covering the years 1966-1971 for the mothers and 1976-1979 for the daughters) indicates that both culture and situation influenced welfare receipt. Education and work experience were about three times as important as attitudes in explaining the variance in the number of years that welfare was received. 6 Tables, 2 Appendixes. (Copyright 1990, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Dolinsky, Arthur Lewis, Richard K. Caputo and Patrick O'Kane. "Competing Effects of Culture and Situation on Welfare Receipt." Social Service Review 63,3 (September 1989): 359-371.
5. Huang, Chien-Chung
The Impact of Child Support Enforcement on Nonmarital and Marital Births: Does It Differ by Racial and Age Groups?
Social Service Review 76,2 (June 2002): 275-301.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/339666
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Child Support; Childbearing; Childbearing, Adolescent; Divorce; Marital Status; Marriage; Racial Differences; Teenagers; Women

Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this article provides evidence that women who live in states with effective child-support enforcement, measured as both strict child-support legislation and high child-support expenditure, are more likely to have marital births and less likely to have nonmarital births. The findings suggest that the deterrence effect of child-support enforcement on men dominates the opposite effect of enforcement on women. For African-American women, effective child-support enforcement is estimated to decrease nonmarital births strongly. For white women, enforcement is estimated to increase marital births largely.
Bibliography Citation
Huang, Chien-Chung. "The Impact of Child Support Enforcement on Nonmarital and Marital Births: Does It Differ by Racial and Age Groups?" Social Service Review 76,2 (June 2002): 275-301.
6. Lee, Kyunghee
The Effects of Children's Head Start Enrollment Age on Their Short- and Long-Term Developmental Outcomes
Social Service Review 82,4 (December 2008): 663-702.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/10.1086/597018
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Head Start; Mothers, Education; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

This study examines how the age at which children enter Head Start affects their academic and behavioral outcomes. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth are incorporated to analyze the progress of 1,553 Head Start children. The research examines outcomes through assessments conducted at ages 5--6 and at ages 11--12. The results suggest that the measured outcomes vary with complicated interactions among age at Head Start entry, maternal education levels, and maternal verbal test scores. In many cases, early age of entry is estimated to improve outcomes for children whose mothers have low education and test scores. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Kyunghee. "The Effects of Children's Head Start Enrollment Age on Their Short- and Long-Term Developmental Outcomes." Social Service Review 82,4 (December 2008): 663-702.
7. Lichter, Daniel T.
Batson, Christie D.
Brown, J. Brian
Welfare Reform and Marriage Promotion: The Marital Expectations and Desires of Single and Cohabiting Mothers
Social Service Review 78,1 (March 2004): 2-25.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/380652
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Fertility; Marital Status; Marriage; Welfare

We examine the marital expectations, desires, and behaviors of single and cohabiting unmarried mothers using nationally representative data. Our study suggests that a substantial majority of unmarried women, including disadvantaged single and cohabiting mothers, value marriage as a personal goal. We also find systematic differences among subgroups with somewhat lower marital expectations among disadvantaged women, single mothers, and racial minority women. However, our results also indicate that marital desires do not easily translate into marriage. Accordingly, from a public policy perspective, single mothers' attitudes or values about marriage need not be changed. The problem is one of identifying and reducing barriers that prevent single women from realizing their strong aspirations for marriage.
Bibliography Citation
Lichter, Daniel T., Christie D. Batson and J. Brian Brown. "Welfare Reform and Marriage Promotion: The Marital Expectations and Desires of Single and Cohabiting Mothers." Social Service Review 78,1 (March 2004): 2-25.
8. Lopoo, Leonard M.
Maternal Employment and Latchkey Adolescents
Social Service Review 79,4 (December 2005): 602-623.
Also: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/SSR/journal/issues/v79n4/790402/790402.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Child Care; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Maternal Employment; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP)

Social scientists who have estimated the relationship between a mother's work hours and the probability that her children care for themselves are often limited by cross-sectional data and use of a small number of control variables. This study uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and a fixed effects logit model to ask if maternal work hours are related to the probability that adolescents spend some time at home alone after school. Results demonstrate that the relationship exists and is nonlinear: only the adolescents of mothers who work more than 30 hours per week are more likely to spend time after school with no adult present, compared with the adolescent children of mothers who are not working. This finding suggests that if social welfare policies encourage low-income mothers to work full-time, these policies may increase the probability that their adolescent children spend some time at home alone after school. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Lopoo, Leonard M. "Maternal Employment and Latchkey Adolescents ." Social Service Review 79,4 (December 2005): 602-623.
9. McNamara, Justine M.
Long-Term Disadvantage among Elderly Women: The Effects of Work History
Social Service Review 81,3 (September 2007): 423-452.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/10.1086/520562
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Welfare; Well-Being; Work History

Despite the emphasis in U.S. social policy on the role of work in addressing poverty and disadvantage for young women, little research focuses on the long-term benefits of work to women. This study focuses on the effects of work history and other factors on the economic well-being of elderly women who had low income in midlife. It uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women (NLSMW) and spans the years from 1967 to 1999. Results suggest that if other factors are controlled, the amount of work low-income women do in midlife has little effect on their economic well-being in old age. Job characteristics, such as whether one is employed in a unionized setting and the availability of a pension plan, do have a positive effect on economic well-being in old age. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Social Service Review is the property of University of Chicago Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
McNamara, Justine M. "Long-Term Disadvantage among Elderly Women: The Effects of Work History." Social Service Review 81,3 (September 2007): 423-452.