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Source: Social Psychology Quarterly
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Erickson, Rebecca J.
Mothers And Mastery: The Consequences Of Perceived Neighborhood Disorder
Social Psychology Quarterly 70,4 (December 2007): 340-365.
Also: http://spq.sagepub.com/content/70/4/340.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Mothers; Neighborhood Effects; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Racial Differences; Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample of mothers, we specify the conditions under which the neighborhood context shapes the experience of mastery. In so doing, we extend the work of others who have shown that neighborhood perceptions influence one's sense of personal control over and above the effects of sociodemographic and objective neighborhood characteristics. Specifically, we demonstrate that the benefits to mastery generally afforded to mothers through marital status, household income, physical health, and living in a higher-income neighborhood are diluted by perceptions of neighborhood disorder. These findings suggest the importance of including measures of proximal experiences when attempting to link objective components of social structure with individual and family-level outcomes. Providing further support for the emphasis placed on these proximate mechanisms by the social structure and personality framework, our analyses indicate that failing to consider negative community perceptions suppresses the significant impact that central city residence and race have on mothers' sense of personal control.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André and Rebecca J. Erickson. "Mothers And Mastery: The Consequences Of Perceived Neighborhood Disorder." Social Psychology Quarterly 70,4 (December 2007): 340-365.
2. Elliott, Marta E.
Impact of Work, Family, and Welfare Receipt on Women's Self-Esteem in Young Adulthood
Social Psychology Quarterly 59,1 (March 1996): 80-95.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2787120
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Employment; Family Influences; Marital Status; Marriage; Motherhood; Self-Esteem; Welfare; Working Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Analyzed the impact of work, family, and welfare on change in 3,076 White women's self-esteem from 1980, when the Ss were aged 15-23 yrs to 1987 when they were aged 22-30 yrs. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data are used to test the effects of work, family, and welfare roles, conditions, and length of role occupancy on change in self-esteem during the transition to adulthood. Results show that marriage tends to improve self- esteem, whereas motherhood and welfare receipt depress it. The effect of being employed interacts with age and motherhood: the positive effect of being employed on change in self-esteem is strongest for younger mothers; the effect is slightly negative for older, childless Ss. Several conditions of work and family mediate the effects of role occupancy on change in self-esteem. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1996 American Psychological Assn, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Elliott, Marta E. "Impact of Work, Family, and Welfare Receipt on Women's Self-Esteem in Young Adulthood." Social Psychology Quarterly 59,1 (March 1996): 80-95.
3. McLeod, Jane D.
Owens, Timothy J.
Psychological Well-Being in the Early Life Course: Variations by Socioeconomic Status, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity
Social Psychology Quarterly 67,3 (September 2004): 257-278.
Also: http://spq.sagepub.com/content/67/3/257.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Children, Poverty; Depression (see also CESD); Growth Curves; Poverty; Racial Studies; Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Our analysis focuses on the implications of social status characteristics for children's psychological well-being. Drawing on social evaluation theories and stress-based explanations, we hypothesized that disadvantage cumulates across statuses (the double jeopardy hypothesis) and over time as children move into the adolescent years. To test this hypothesis, we estimated the independent and interactive effects of socioeconomic status, gender, and race/ethnicity on the latent growth curves for four outcomes, from preadolescence to early adolescence, using data from the Children of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth data set. Our results were consistent with the double jeopardy hypothesis for the interaction of race/ethnicity and poverty, but not for the other interactions we estimated. In the case of gender and poverty, the strength of the evidence for the double jeopardy hypothesis varied by outcome: evidence was more consistent for scholastic competence and self-esteem than for depression and hyperactivity. In the case of gender and race/ethnicity, our results consistently refuted the double jeopardy hypothesis.
Bibliography Citation
McLeod, Jane D. and Timothy J. Owens. "Psychological Well-Being in the Early Life Course: Variations by Socioeconomic Status, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity." Social Psychology Quarterly 67,3 (September 2004): 257-278.
4. Parcel, Toby L.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Family Social Capital and Children's Behavior Problems
Social Psychology Quarterly 56,2 (June 1993):120-135.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2787001
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Home Environment; Family Structure; General Assessment; Household Composition; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Maternal Employment; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Working Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We argue that social capital that inheres in the relationships between parents and children should be associated with internalization of social norms in children. Changes in parental working conditions and family circumstances should affect children's social adjustment because such factors affect the formation and use of social capital in families. We study variations in children's behavior problems in a sample of 524 6-8 year old children in married couple families in 1988 derived from the National Longitudinal Survey's Youth Cohort Child Mother data 1986 and 1988. We find that higher levels of maternal mastery, and more positive home environments protect children against behavior problems. Analyses of change in behavior problems also suggest that 1986 levels of paternal complexity have protective effects, while the birth of additional siblings and the lowest levels of maternal paid work hours place children at risk. We interpret these findings to suggest specific mechanisms through which family social capital promotes norm transmission across generations.
Bibliography Citation
Parcel, Toby L. and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "Family Social Capital and Children's Behavior Problems." Social Psychology Quarterly 56,2 (June 1993):120-135.
5. Parcel, Toby L.
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Maternal Working Conditions and Children's Verbal Facility: Studying the Intergenerational Transmission of Inequality from Mothers to Young Children
Social Psychology Quarterly 53,2 (June 1990): 132-147.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2786675
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Child Care; Child Development; Children, Academic Development; Children, Home Environment; Family Background; General Assessment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Maternal Employment; Mothers; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Tests and Testing; Working Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the intergenerational transmission of inequality from mothers to young children by investigating the effects of maternal working conditions on children's verbal facility. The authors argue that the better paying the mother's job and the more substantively complex the work activities in her occupation, the higher the child's measured verbal facility. The researchers also expect a nonlinear relationship between maternal work hours and verbal facility. They argue that children's experiences at home and in non-maternal care arrangements mediate the effects of working conditions on the dependent variable. A sample of 697 3-6 year old children matched to currently employed mothers in the 1986 NLSY are studied. Verbal facility is measured with the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT), a measure of receptive vocabulary. The hypotheses are generally supported, even when family characteristics and mother's and child's background are controlled, although non-maternal care arrangements do not impact PPVT. The paper concludes with a discussion of directions for future research including extensions to additional child outcomes, incorporation of paternal working conditions into similar models, and investigation of these processes with more elaborate longitudinal models.
Bibliography Citation
Parcel, Toby L. and Elizabeth G. Menaghan. "Maternal Working Conditions and Children's Verbal Facility: Studying the Intergenerational Transmission of Inequality from Mothers to Young Children." Social Psychology Quarterly 53,2 (June 1990): 132-147.