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Source: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Jackson, John W.
Williams, David R.
VanderWeele, Tyler J.
Disparities at the Intersection of Marginalized Groups
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 51,10 (October 2016): 1349-1359.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00127-016-1276-6
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Incarceration/Jail; Socioeconomic Background; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Unemployment; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Mental health disparities exist across several dimensions of social inequality, including race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status and gender. Most investigations of health disparities focus on one dimension. Recent calls by researchers argue for studying persons who are marginalized in multiple ways, often from the perspective of intersectionality, a theoretical framework applied to qualitative studies in law, sociology, and psychology. Quantitative adaptations are emerging but there is little guidance as to what measures or methods are helpful.
Bibliography Citation
Jackson, John W., David R. Williams and Tyler J. VanderWeele. "Disparities at the Intersection of Marginalized Groups." Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 51,10 (October 2016): 1349-1359.
2. Levine, Stephen Z.
Evaluating the Seven-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale Short-form: a Longitudinal US Community Study
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 48,9 (September 2013): 1519-1526.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00127-012-0650-2
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Modeling; Scale Construction

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data were examined from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. Participants responded to the 20-item CES-D (n = 8,858) in 1992, and to the 7-item CES-D-SF in 1994 (n = 8,500) and from 1998 to 2010 if aged 40 (n = 7,972) or 50 (n = 1,574) or over. Variables examined in 1979 were race, SES, and sex and in 1981 cognitive functioning. The CES-D-SF was examined for internal and test–retest reliability, unidimensionality with confirmatory factor analysis, and a cutoff score with receiver operator curve characteristics. Survival analysis was used to examine time period of first CES-D-SF suspected major depression episode, multinomial regression to examine the chronicity of CES-D-SF suspected major depression, and the course of depression with a Generalized Estimating Equation model.
Bibliography Citation
Levine, Stephen Z. "Evaluating the Seven-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale Short-form: a Longitudinal US Community Study." Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 48,9 (September 2013): 1519-1526.
3. Walsh, Sophie D.
Levine, Stephen Z.
Levav, Itzhak
The Association between Depression and Parental Ethnic Affiliation and Socioeconomic Status: A 27-year Longitudinal US Community Study
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 47,7 (July 2012): 1153-1158.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/9381868k8705283q/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Parental Influences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose: This study examined the extent to which parental SES and ethnic affiliation during adolescence are associated with Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) scores compatible with depression during adulthood.

Methods: The data were extracted from the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) conducted in 1979 on several ethnic groups (African-Americans, Hispanics and Others). These data included paternal socio-economic status (SES) when respondents (N = 8,331) were on average aged 18. The CES-D was re-administered 27 years later to assess the presence of depression.

Results: Adjusted for age, binary logistic regression modeling showed that parental low SES increased the risk of CES-D of scores compatible with depression across ethnic groups for both genders. A gradient was observed of an increased likelihood of depression scores with lower parental SES levels: among African-American respondents, depression scores were highest at the lowest parental SES levels (OR = 3.25, 95% CI 2.19–4.84) and the risk dropped at medium (OR = 3.00, 95% CI 1.96–4.59), and highest SES levels (OR = 1.85, 95% CI 1.12–3.07). An analogous pattern was generally found for each ethnic group.

Conclusions: Low parental SES during adolescence significantly increases the likelihood of CES-D scores compatible with depression during adulthood across US ethnic groups and in both genders.

Bibliography Citation
Walsh, Sophie D., Stephen Z. Levine and Itzhak Levav. "The Association between Depression and Parental Ethnic Affiliation and Socioeconomic Status: A 27-year Longitudinal US Community Study ." Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 47,7 (July 2012): 1153-1158.
4. Wolfe, Joseph D.
The Effects of Maternal Alcohol Use Disorders on Childhood Relationships and Mental Health
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 51,10 (October 2016): 1439-1448.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00127-016-1264-x
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Health, Mental; Mothers, Behavior; Parental Influences; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Siblings; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose: Despite millions of children living in the turmoil of their parents' active alcoholism or the aftermath of past abuse, research to date has not (1) provided a comprehensive examination of the effects of maternal alcohol use disorders (AUDs) on children's social ties outside of their relationships with parents, or (2) considered whether the number and quality of childhood social ties alter the effects of maternal AUDs on children's mental health.

Method: Using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979 Children and Young Adults, analysis examined the influence of maternal AUDs on the number and quality of children's ties with siblings, extended family and family friends, peers, and neighborhood members. The analysis also considered how children's social ties influenced the association between maternal AUDs and children's internalizing and externalizing problems.

Results: Children of alcoholic mothers had similarly sized networks but more distant relationships with siblings and friends, negative interactions with classmates, and isolating neighborhoods. Controlling for these aspects of children's social ties substantially reduced mental health disparities between children of alcoholic mothers and other children.

Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D. "The Effects of Maternal Alcohol Use Disorders on Childhood Relationships and Mental Health." Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 51,10 (October 2016): 1439-1448.