Search Results

Source: SSM - Population Health
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Addo, Fenaba
Seeking Relief: Bankruptcy and Health Outcomes of Adult Women
SSM - Population Health 3 (December 2017): 326-334.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352827316300842
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Bankruptcy; Depression (see also CESD); Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Women

This study examined the impact of declaring consumer bankruptcy on the physical and mental health of adult women and whether the effects differ depending on whether the filer received automatic debt discharge under Chapter 7 compared to a debt repayment plan with Chapter 13. Sample data consisted of women from the NLSY79 cohort who completed the age 40 and 50 health modules as of the most recent wave. Results indicated a negative effect of bankruptcy on self-assessed health, whereas prior health history explained its negative relationship with depressive symptoms. Debt liquidation under Chapter 7 was associated with poor physical health relative to those who did not file and with depressive symptoms relative to Chapter 13 repayment plan filers. Poor health is an unintended consequence for women who seek financial relief through bankruptcy.
Bibliography Citation
Addo, Fenaba. "Seeking Relief: Bankruptcy and Health Outcomes of Adult Women." SSM - Population Health 3 (December 2017): 326-334.
2. Beheshti, Rahmatollah
Jalalpour, Mehdi
Glass, Thomas A.
Comparing Methods of Targeting Obesity Interventions in Populations: An Agent-based Simulation
SSM - Population Health 3 (December 2017): 211-218.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352827317300186
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior; Comparison Group (Reference group); Obesity

Social networks as well as neighborhood environments have been shown to effect obesity-related behaviors including energy intake and physical activity. Accordingly, harnessing social networks to improve targeting of obesity interventions may be promising to the extent this leads to social multiplier effects and wider diffusion of intervention impact on populations. However, the literature evaluating network-based interventions has been inconsistent. Computational methods like agent-based models (ABM) provide researchers with tools to experiment in a simulated environment. We develop an ABM to compare conventional targeting methods (random selection, based on individual obesity risk, and vulnerable areas) with network-based targeting methods. We adapt a previously published and validated model of network diffusion of obesity-related behavior. We then build social networks among agents using a more realistic approach. We calibrate our model first against national-level data. Our results show that network-based targeting may lead to greater population impact. We also present a new targeting method that outperforms other methods in terms of intervention effectiveness at the population level.
Bibliography Citation
Beheshti, Rahmatollah, Mehdi Jalalpour and Thomas A. Glass. "Comparing Methods of Targeting Obesity Interventions in Populations: An Agent-based Simulation." SSM - Population Health 3 (December 2017): 211-218.
3. Brown, Daniel M.
Abrams, Barbara
Cohen, Alison K.
Rehkopf, David
Motherhood, Fatherhood and Midlife Weight Gain in a US Cohort: Associations Differ by Race/ethnicity and Socioeconomic Position
SSM - Population Health 3 (December 2017): 558-565.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352827317300423
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Childbearing; Ethnic Differences; Fatherhood; Motherhood; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Weight

While there is an association of greater short-term weight gain with childbearing among women, less is known about longer-term weight gain, whether men have similar gains, and how this varies by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic position. Our cohort consisted of a nationally representative sample of 7,356 Americans with oversampling of Black and Hispanic populations. We estimated the associations between number of biological children and parental weight, measured as both change in self-reported body mass index (BMI) from age 18 and overweight/obese status (BMI ≥ 25) at age 40. We performed multivariate linear and logistic regression analysis and tested for effect modification by gender. For change in BMI, men gained on average 0.28 BMI (95% CI: (0.01, 0.55)) units per child, while women gained 0.13 units per child (95% CI: (-0.22, 0.48)). The adjusted odds ratios for overweight/obesity associated with each child were 1.32 (95% CI: (1.11, 1.58)) for men and 1.15 (95% CI: (1.01, 1.31)) for women. Stratified analyses by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic position suggested that the observed full-cohort differences were driven primarily by gendered differences in low-income Hispanics and Whites – with the greatest associations among Hispanic men. For example, among low-income Hispanic men we observed a positive relationship between the number of children and weight change by age 40, with average weight change of 0.47 units per child (95%CI: (-0.65, 1.59 For low-income Hispanic women, however, the average weight change was -0.59 units per child (95%CI: (-1.70, 0.47), and the P-value for the test of interaction between gender and number of children was P < 0.001. Our findings suggest that the shared social and economic aspects of raising children play an important role in determining parental weight at mid-life.
Bibliography Citation
Brown, Daniel M., Barbara Abrams, Alison K. Cohen and David Rehkopf. "Motherhood, Fatherhood and Midlife Weight Gain in a US Cohort: Associations Differ by Race/ethnicity and Socioeconomic Position." SSM - Population Health 3 (December 2017): 558-565.
4. Comeau, Jinette
Boyle, Michael H.
Patterns of Poverty Exposure and Children's Trajectories of Externalizing and Internalizing Behaviors
SSM - Population Health 4 (April 2018): 86-94.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352827317301489
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Family Income; Health, Mental; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Mothers, Education; Parents, Single; Poverty

Using data from the Child Supplement of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we compare trajectories of externalizing and internalizing behaviors among children exposed to five patterns of poverty from birth to age 14: always or never poor -- stable patterns; a single transition into or out of poverty, or repeated fluctuations in and out of poverty -- changing patterns. We also examine how low maternal education and single parenthood interact with these poverty exposures to compound their adverse effects. Finally, we compare the magnitude of effects associated with the patterns of poverty exposure, as well as their interactions with low maternal education and single parenthood, on trajectories of externalizing and internalizing behaviors to determine if they are significantly different. Results reveal that initial levels and rates of change in children's trajectories of externalizing and internalizing behaviors are similar across the three changing patterns of poverty exposure, leading us to combine them into a single group representing intermittent poverty. Initial disparities between children who are never poor and their counterparts who are always or intermittently poor are constant over time for internalizing behaviors and grow in magnitude for externalizing behaviors. The cumulative negative effect of poverty exposure over time is stronger for externalizing vs. internalizing behaviors. Low maternal education compounds the adverse effects of persistent poverty, an effect that is similar for externalizing and internalizing behaviors.
Bibliography Citation
Comeau, Jinette and Michael H. Boyle. "Patterns of Poverty Exposure and Children's Trajectories of Externalizing and Internalizing Behaviors." SSM - Population Health 4 (April 2018): 86-94.