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Source: Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Apel, Robert
Powell, Kathleen
Level of Criminal Justice Contact and Early Adult Wage Inequality
RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences 5,1 Criminal Justice Contact and Inequality (February 2019), 198-222.
Also: https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7758/rsf.2019.5.1.09
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Keyword(s): Arrests; Criminal Justice System; Incarceration/Jail; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Racial Differences; Wage Gap

This study explores heterogeneity in the relationship between criminal justice contact and early adult wages using unconditional quantile regression models with sibling fixed effects, estimated separately by race-ethnicity. The findings support the contention that the relationship between criminal justice contact and wages is heterogeneous in three respects: level of contact, race, and location in the wage distribution. First, entry-level contacts in the form of arrest are largely uncorrelated with wages, whereas wage gaps are evident following late-stage contacts in the form of jail or prison incarceration. Second, the wage gap from incarceration is observable among black respondents, but not whites or Latinos. Third, the size of the wage gap from incarceration is approximately U-shaped with respect to the black wage distribution.
Bibliography Citation
Apel, Robert and Kathleen Powell. "Level of Criminal Justice Contact and Early Adult Wage Inequality." RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences 5,1 Criminal Justice Contact and Inequality (February 2019), 198-222.
2. Killewald, Alexandra
Bryan, Brielle
Does Your Home Make You Wealthy?
Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences 2,6 (October 2016): 110-128.
Also: http://www.rsfjournal.org/doi/full/10.7758/RSF.2016.2.6.06
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Home Ownership; Modeling, Marginal Structural; Racial Differences; Wealth

Estimating the lifetime wealth consequences of homeownership is complicated by ongoing events, such as divorce or inheritance, that may shape both homeownership decisions and later-life wealth. We argue that prior research that has not accounted for these dynamic selection processes has overstated the causal effect of homeownership on wealth. Using NLSY79 data and marginal structural models, we find that each additional year of homeownership increases midlife wealth in 2008 by about $6,800, more than 25 percent less than estimates from models that do not account for dynamic selection. Hispanic and African American wealth benefits from each homeownership year are 62 percent and 48 percent as large as those of whites, respectively. Homeownership remains wealth-enhancing in 2012, but shows smaller returns. Our results confirm homeownership's role in wealth accumulation and that variation in both homeownership rates and the wealth benefits of homeownership contribute to racial and ethnic disparities in midlife wealth holdings.
Bibliography Citation
Killewald, Alexandra and Brielle Bryan. "Does Your Home Make You Wealthy?" Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences 2,6 (October 2016): 110-128.
3. Sawhill, Isabel V.
Reeves, Richard V.
Modeling Equal Opportunity
Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences 2,2 (May 2016): 60-97.
Also: http://www.rsfjournal.org/doi/full/10.7758/RSF.2016.2.2.03
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Keyword(s): Achievement; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Academic Development; Children, Well-Being; Family Income; Gender Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Life Course; Mobility, Economic; Modeling, Simulation; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); School Entry/Readiness

We examine the themes of equal opportunity, intergenerational mobility, and inequality. We address the normative and definitional questions of selecting measures of mobility and summarize the current state of intergenerational mobility in the United States and abroad. We introduce a new microsimulation model, the Social Genome Model (SGM), which provides a framework for measuring success in each stage of the life cycle. We show how the SGM can be used not only to understand the pathways to the middle class, but also to simulate the impact of policy interventions on rates of mobility.
Bibliography Citation
Sawhill, Isabel V. and Richard V. Reeves. "Modeling Equal Opportunity ." Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences 2,2 (May 2016): 60-97.
4. Weaver, Vesla M.
Papachristos, Andrew
Zanger-Tishler, Michael
The Great Decoupling: The Disconnection Between Criminal Offending and Experience of Arrest Across Two Cohorts
RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences 5,1 Criminal Justice Contact and Inequality (February 2019), 89-123.
Also: https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7758/rsf.2019.5.1.05
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Keyword(s): Arrests; Crime; Criminal Justice System; Racial Differences

Our study explores the arrest experiences of two generational cohorts--those entering adulthood on either side of a large shift in American policing. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979 and 1997), we find a stark increase in arrest odds among the later generation at every level of offending, suggesting a decoupling between contact with the justice system and criminal conduct. Furthermore, this decoupling became racially inflected. Blacks had a much higher probability of arrest at the start of the twenty-first century than both blacks of the generation prior and whites of the same generation. The criminal justice system, we argue, slipped from one in which arrest was low and strongly linked to offending to one where a substantial share of Americans experienced arrest without committing a crime.
Bibliography Citation
Weaver, Vesla M., Andrew Papachristos and Michael Zanger-Tishler. "The Great Decoupling: The Disconnection Between Criminal Offending and Experience of Arrest Across Two Cohorts." RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences 5,1 Criminal Justice Contact and Inequality (February 2019), 89-123.