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Source: Rural Sociology
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Cheong, Keywon
Toney, Michael B.
Stinner, William F.
Racial Differences among Young Men in the Selection of Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Destinations
Rural Sociology 51,2 (Summer 1986): 222-228
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Rural Sociological Society
Keyword(s): Migration; Mobility, Job; Racial Differences; Rural Sociology; Rural/Urban Migration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study is an empirical examination of the extent to which racial differences exist in young men's selection of metropolitan and nonmetropolitan destinations, after adjusting for compositional differences. The tendency of previous studies to focus on the migration of a single racial group left a gap in systematic comparisons across race. Results here, based on the Young Men cohort of the NLS, indicate that young black males are much less likely than young white males to select nonmetropolitan destinations. Migration thus increases racial segregation. The findings are discussed in both demographic and socioeconomic contexts.
Bibliography Citation
Cheong, Keywon, Michael B. Toney and William F. Stinner. "Racial Differences among Young Men in the Selection of Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Destinations." Rural Sociology 51,2 (Summer 1986): 222-228.
2. Garrett, Patricia
Ng'Andu, Nicholas
Ferron, John
Is Rural Residency a Risk Factor for Childhood Poverty?
Rural Sociology 59,1 (Spring 1994): 66-83.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1549-0831.1994.tb00522.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Rural Sociological Society
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Childhood Residence; Children; Disadvantaged, Economically; Family Characteristics; Family Structure; Fathers, Absence; Household Composition; Mothers, Education; Mothers, Race; Poverty; Rural Areas; Rural/Urban Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The influence of rural variables on young children's poverty status, adjusting for individual and family characteristics, is explored. The literature suggests that specific demographic variables exert all overwhelming influence on children's poverty status. This is confirmed with data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Results also suggest that the residential histories of children have consequences for their poverty, status, even after the influence of control variables has been taken into account. The conclusion identifies the integration of survey and ecological data as one promising direction for future research on childhood poverty.
Bibliography Citation
Garrett, Patricia, Nicholas Ng'Andu and John Ferron. "Is Rural Residency a Risk Factor for Childhood Poverty?" Rural Sociology 59,1 (Spring 1994): 66-83.
3. Kruse, Douglas L.
Profit Sharing and the Demand for Low-Skill Workers
In: Generating Jobs: How to Increase Demand for Less-Skilled Workers. R. Freeman and P. Gottschalk, eds., New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1998: 105-153
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Rural Sociological Society
Keyword(s): Benefits; Earnings; Educational Returns; Job Skills; Job Training; Job Turnover; Layoffs; Skilled Workers; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Difficulty in finding and keeping jobs is an important part of the earnings problems of low-skill workers. Profit sharing has been proposed as a means to increase demand for workers. To examine the potential role of profit sharing in the employment of low-skill workers, this study uses recent longitudinal data from young employees to examine: 1) the prevalence of profit sharing by personal and job characteristics, including the skill requirements of jobs; 2) its relationship to pay and other benefits; and 3) its association with the disposition of a job over a five-year period, focusing on the risk of layoff. Key findings are that profit sharing is more common among the highly-educated, and for jobs requiring more schooling, but is not generally associated with training requirements of jobs. Pay levels and other benefits are generally higher for profit-sharers and for those moving into profit-sharing jobs, but pay levels are equivalent between profit-sharers and non-sharers with equivalent benefits. Finally, profit sharing is associated with lower layoff risks for both existing jobs and new jobs, although the apparent lack of substitution with fixed pay raises the question of whether profit sharing is affecting labor demand as predicted by theory. The profit-sharing estimates do not appear to vary systematically with skill requirements of jobs, indicating that if current forms of profit sharing do increase demand for workers, they do so across all skill levels.
Bibliography Citation
Kruse, Douglas L. "Profit Sharing and the Demand for Low-Skill Workers" In: Generating Jobs: How to Increase Demand for Less-Skilled Workers. R. Freeman and P. Gottschalk, eds., New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1998: 105-153
4. Maret, Elizabeth G.
Chenoweth, Lillian Cochran
Labor Force Patterns of Mature Rural Women
Rural Sociology 44,4 (Winter 1979): 736-753
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Rural Sociological Society
Keyword(s): Children; Earnings; Husbands, Influence; Marital Status; Rural Sociology; Rural Women; Schooling; Sex Roles; Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA); Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Labor force participation of two samples of rural women are investigated. A comparison is made between those living within SMSAs and outside. The findings indicate substantial differences in supply and demand factors related to labor market activity.
Bibliography Citation
Maret, Elizabeth G. and Lillian Cochran Chenoweth. "Labor Force Patterns of Mature Rural Women." Rural Sociology 44,4 (Winter 1979): 736-753.
5. Wenk, Deeann L.
Hardesty, Constance L.
The Effects of Rural-to-Urban Migration on the Poverty Status of Youth in the 1980s
Rural Sociology 58,1 (Spring 1993): 76-92.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1549-0831.1993.tb00483.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Rural Sociological Society
Keyword(s): Migration; Poverty; Rural/Urban Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The effects of rural-to-urban migration on the poverty status of migrants have not been adequately explored. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine poverty status before and after a rural-to-urban migration, a proportional hazards model of time spent in poverty that begins in rural areas is estimated to determine whether moving to an urban area reduces the time spent in poverty moving to an urban area reduces the time spent in poverty while controlling for individual educational and family characteristics. Results indicate that moving from a rural to an urban area reduces time spent in poverty for white and black women but the effects are not statistically significant for men. Further, to adequately understand the relationship between moving to an urban area and poverty, the analysis examines the effects of moving on the length of time spent not employed.
Bibliography Citation
Wenk, Deeann L. and Constance L. Hardesty. "The Effects of Rural-to-Urban Migration on the Poverty Status of Youth in the 1980s." Rural Sociology 58,1 (Spring 1993): 76-92.
6. Wilson-Figueroa, Maria E.
Berry, Eddy Helen
Toney, Michael B.
Migration of Hispanic Youth and Poverty Status: A Logit Analysis
Rural Sociology 56,2 (June 1991): 189-203.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1549-0831.1991.tb00431.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Rural Sociological Society
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; Hispanic Youth; Hispanics; Migration; Mobility; Occupational Status; Poverty; Unemployment Rate; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The research investigated whether poor Hispanic youth exhibited less migration than nonpoor Hispanic youth. The hypothesis was that migration is a means to escape poverty, although poverty acts as an inhibitor to migration. The data for the study were derived from NLSY and the 1988 County and City Data Book (U. S. Census Bureau). Individual migration between 1984 and 1986 for 1,466 Hispanic respondents who were ages 14-21 in 1979 was the dependent variable. Log linear modeling was used to analyze the data. Microlevel variables (characteristics of respondents) were: sex, occupation status, educational attainment, public assistance, and poverty status. Macrolevel variables (characteristics of counties) were: unemployment rate and percentage of families poor (i.e. below the poverty level). Results showed partial support for the hypothesis, depending on how poverty was defined. Poverty status places limitations on the geographical mobility of Hispanics and may limit their ability to upgrade their socioeconomic status; therefore, policy makers need to concentrate on providing education and training to Hispanic youth. The educational attainment of Hispanics remains below the level of their non-Hispanic counterparts and Hispanics tend to have higher rates of unemployment than whites. Policies should target employment opportunities for Hispanics. [ERIC ED329397]
Bibliography Citation
Wilson-Figueroa, Maria E., Eddy Helen Berry and Michael B. Toney. "Migration of Hispanic Youth and Poverty Status: A Logit Analysis." Rural Sociology 56,2 (June 1991): 189-203.