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Source: Review of Public Personnel Administration
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. AbouAssi, Khaldoun
Johnson, Jasmine McGinnis
Holt, Stephen B.
Job Mobility Among Millennials: Do They Stay or Do They Go?
Review of Public Personnel Administration published online (15 September 2019): DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19874396.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0734371X19874396
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Job Satisfaction; Job Turnover; Mobility, Job; Volunteer Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Millennials are a substantial segment of the workforce; they are perceived to be driven by higher pay, quick to be dissatisfied and leave a job, and committed to volunteering. This article examines how these perceptions translate to job mobility in terms of job switching within and across sectors, without drawing cross-generation comparisons. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (NLSY97) from 2008 to 2013, we notice a trend among millennials of frequent job switching within rather than across sectors. Job dissatisfaction is the strongest predictor of public-sector employees switching jobs within the sector. For sector switching, we find some variation: Low pay corresponds with exiting the nonprofit sector, whereas job dissatisfaction is the strongest predictor of leaving the public sector. Millennials working in the public and nonprofit sectors are less likely to switch sectors if they volunteer. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
AbouAssi, Khaldoun, Jasmine McGinnis Johnson and Stephen B. Holt. "Job Mobility Among Millennials: Do They Stay or Do They Go?" Review of Public Personnel Administration published online (15 September 2019): DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19874396.
2. Steel, Brent S.
Warner, Rebecca L.
Job Satisfaction Among Early Labor Force Participants: Unexpected Outcomes in Public and Private Sector Comparisons
Review of Public Personnel Administration 10,3 (Summer 1990): 4-22
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute of Public Affairs, University of South Carolina
Keyword(s): Job Satisfaction; Private Sector; Public Sector

A systematic investigation is presented of the level of job satisfaction among a national cross-section of early labor force participants in the public and private employment sectors in the late 1980s. The NLSY was the source of the data. Although conventional wisdom has suggested that there is a crisis in the level of job satisfaction among public sector employees due to extensive bureaucrat bashing and working in overly rigid organizations, the findings suggest that public sector employees manifest significantly higher levels of job satisfaction than their private sector counterparts. After controlling for a number of background, personal, and situational factors, the higher level of public sector job satisfaction remains. It is evident from the analyses that the public sector has been successful in attracting and keeping qualified and highly motivated young employees. [ABI/INFORM]
Bibliography Citation
Steel, Brent S. and Rebecca L. Warner. "Job Satisfaction Among Early Labor Force Participants: Unexpected Outcomes in Public and Private Sector Comparisons." Review of Public Personnel Administration 10,3 (Summer 1990): 4-22.