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Source: Review of Black Political Economy
Resulting in 20 citations.
1. Adams, Arvil Van
Mangum, Stephen L.
Wirtz, Philip W.
Postschool Education and Training: Accessible to All?
Review of Black Political Economy 15,3 (Winter 1987): 68-86.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/j6769670085w85h2/
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: National Economic Association
Keyword(s): Education; Life Cycle Research; Racial Differences; Schooling, Post-secondary; Training, Post-School; Unemployment Rate, Regional

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines knowledge and skill development during early adulthood when the individual has severed ties with formal education and entered the world of work. Focusing on the Young Men's cohort, the paper examines the economic and social forces influencing participation in various forms of postschool education and training. A recursive model is used to explore skill development patterns over the lifecycle. Attention is focused on the role of early human capital development and its influence on the cost and incentives for subsequent skill development in the adult working years. The findings point to the cumulative nature of skill development over the lifecycle with some important implications for efforts to reduce economic and social inequalities for blacks and whites.
Bibliography Citation
Adams, Arvil Van, Stephen L. Mangum and Philip W. Wirtz. "Postschool Education and Training: Accessible to All?" Review of Black Political Economy 15,3 (Winter 1987): 68-86.
2. Cordero-Guzman, Hector Ruben
Cognitive Skills, Test Scores, and Social Stratification: The Role of Family and School-Level Resources on Racial/Ethnic Differences in Scores on Standardized Tests (AFQT)
Review of Black Political Economy 28,4 (Spring 2001): 31-71.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/9k0tl8rg15yr60ad/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Educational Attainment; Family Resources; Minorities; Parental Investments; Racial Differences; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; School Quality; Social Capital; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Argues that lower scores by minorities on the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) is largely due to their lack of access to the material resources, social investments, and exposure to values, experiences, and networks of the white upper middle class; based on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79).

In this paper I have shown that scores on the AFQT are a function of family and school level material resources and investments on individual development. The AFQT is not a measure of “intelligence (IQ),” “ability,” or “cognitive skills.” The AFQT is in large part a measure of access to material resources, social investments, and exposure to the values, experiences, and networks of the white upper middle class.

Bibliography Citation
Cordero-Guzman, Hector Ruben. "Cognitive Skills, Test Scores, and Social Stratification: The Role of Family and School-Level Resources on Racial/Ethnic Differences in Scores on Standardized Tests (AFQT)." Review of Black Political Economy 28,4 (Spring 2001): 31-71.
3. Devaraj, Srikant
Patel, Pankaj C.
Skin Tone and Self-Employment: Is there an Intra-Group Variation among Blacks?
Review of Black Political Economy 44,1 (2017): 137-166.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12114-017-9249-x
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Self-Employed Workers; Skin Tone

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The purpose of this paper is to formally evaluate whether odds of entry into self-employment decrease as skin tone darkens for Blacks in the United States. Extending past work on inter-group differences in Black-White self-employment, based on data from National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, with darker skin tone the odds of self-employment decline. Having spent more time in labor force further decreases the likelihood of self-employment for darker skin tone Blacks, and being a high-school graduate, scoring high on Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB), or higher past year income are not associated with self-employment of darker skin tone Blacks. While darker skin tone Blacks who are self-employed derive lower income, those who are self-employed and with more human capital (longer time spent in the labor force, scoring high on ASVAB or being a high school graduate) have a higher income.
Bibliography Citation
Devaraj, Srikant and Pankaj C. Patel. "Skin Tone and Self-Employment: Is there an Intra-Group Variation among Blacks?" Review of Black Political Economy 44,1 (2017): 137-166.
4. Duncan, Kevin Craig
The Vintage Schooling Hypothesis and Racial Differences in Earnings and On-The-Job Training: A Longitudinal Analysis
Review of Black Political Economy 20,3 (Winter 1992): 99-117.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/104p16w66896593t/fulltext.pdf
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: National Economic Association
Keyword(s): Earnings; Life Cycle Research; Racial Differences; School Quality; Schooling; Training

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience for Youth indicates a vintage effect that is. lower black-white earnings ratios for older cohorts relative to younger cohorts. However, an examination of longitudinal earnings ratios suggests such an effect can be attributed to intra-cohort deterioration of black earnings over the life cycle rather than to inter-cohort differences in school quality. Regression results indicate that the role of education in influencing continued wage growth on-the-job differs by race. More educated white males hold occupations with steeper experience-earnings profiles. The same can be said of blacks only at a lower level of statistical confidence.
Bibliography Citation
Duncan, Kevin Craig. "The Vintage Schooling Hypothesis and Racial Differences in Earnings and On-The-Job Training: A Longitudinal Analysis." Review of Black Political Economy 20,3 (Winter 1992): 99-117.
5. Duncan, Kevin
Sandy, Jonathan
Using the Blinder-Oaxaca Decomposition Method to Measure Racial Bias in Achievement Tests
Review of Black Political Economy 40,2 (June 2013): 185-206.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12114-012-9146-2/fulltext.html
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Modeling; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Racial Differences; Racial Equality/Inequality; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition technique is typically applied to gender or racial earnings gaps with the goal of determining the percent of the gap that can be attributed to differences in attributes between groups and to labor market discrimination. We apply this technique to the racial gap in achievement tests with the goal of measuring the relative racial bias of these tests. The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) and the Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT) were administered to respondents from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Decomposition results indicate that up to 49.5% of the white-black gap in the PIAT is explained by racial differences in average attributes. The corresponding figure for the ASVAB is 44.7 %. Since the same sample and specification are used in estimating ASVAB and PIAT scores, the difference in the percent of the gaps due to attributes can be ascribed to test score bias and not omitted variable bias. Therefore, the results suggest that the "discrimination" or bias of the ASVAB is greater than the PIAT.
Bibliography Citation
Duncan, Kevin and Jonathan Sandy. "Using the Blinder-Oaxaca Decomposition Method to Measure Racial Bias in Achievement Tests." Review of Black Political Economy 40,2 (June 2013): 185-206.
6. Ewing, Bradley T.
High School Athletics and the Wages of Black Males
The Review of Black Political Economy 24,1 (Summer 1995): 65-78.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/hl451370n61785t5/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Economic Association
Keyword(s): Athletics (see SPORTS); Black Youth; High School; Human Capital; Modeling; Sports (also see ATHLETICS); Wage Differentials; Wage Effects; Wage Models

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines the effects of high school athletic participation on the future wages of black males. Our evidence suggests that former black male athletes receive significantly greater wages than their otherwise comparable counterparts. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth was used for the analysis and allows for comparisons of the athlete premium to be made at different points in time. Both the human capital and signaling models are discussed. There appears to be a once and for all enhancement to human capital that accrues to black males who participated in high school athletics. The article adds to the literature on determinants of black male wages and on the earnings effects of athletic participation.
Bibliography Citation
Ewing, Bradley T. "High School Athletics and the Wages of Black Males." The Review of Black Political Economy 24,1 (Summer 1995): 65-78.
7. Fernandes, Ronald
Ha, Inhyuck Steve
McElroy, Susan Williams
Myers, Samuel L., Jr.
Black-White Disparities in Test Scores: Distributional Characteristics
Review of Black Political Economy 43,2 (June 2016): 209-232.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12114-015-9230-5/fulltext.html
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Racial Differences; School Suspension/Expulsion; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates the distributional characteristics of racial differences in mathematics achievement, with particular attention to the potential influence of unexplained, and possibly unwarranted, racial differentials in rates of school suspension. It is well known that black students consistently score lower than whites on achievement tests, on average, even after controlling for family and schooling factors. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort, we decompose the racial gap in mathematics test scores from the Peabody Individual Achievement Test-Revised (PIAT-R) into a component due to racial differences in underlying characteristics and another component that is unexplained by differences in measured characteristics. We account for the possible endogeneity of suspensions in our analysis and show that the portion of the racial gap that is unexplained differs between the top and the bottom of the test score distribution. Our results suggest that researchers should pay more attention to the problem of concentration of black students among those at the bottom of the distribution and their scarcity among those at the top of the test score distribution to better understand the factors that account for the observed disparities.
Bibliography Citation
Fernandes, Ronald, Inhyuck Steve Ha, Susan Williams McElroy and Samuel L. Myers. "Black-White Disparities in Test Scores: Distributional Characteristics." Review of Black Political Economy 43,2 (June 2016): 209-232.
8. Hills, Stephen M.
Race and Sex Differences in the Effects of Early Unemployment on Wages
Review of Black Political Economy 18,4 (Spring 1990): 13-36.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/f9628r3607l0r203/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Economic Association
Keyword(s): Education; Human Capital Theory; Training; Unemployment Duration; Unemployment, Youth; Wage Differentials; Wages; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article studies the relationship between youth unemployment and long-term earnings, particularly for Blacks in the U.S. 1979-84. Youth unemployment is shown to have significant depressing effects on black long-run earnings over and above the loss in world experience which accompanies unemployment. Estimates were similar for men and women, showing that for each week of unemployment black youth incurred early in their work careers, wages were reduced by about one half a percentage point five years later. A six month bout with unemployment in 1979 was related to a 13 percent drop in wage rates five years later. For white youth, joblessness, but not unemployment per se, had a significant negative impact on subsequent wage rates.
Bibliography Citation
Hills, Stephen M. "Race and Sex Differences in the Effects of Early Unemployment on Wages." Review of Black Political Economy 18,4 (Spring 1990): 13-36.
9. Hoffman, Emily P.
Comparative Labor Supply of Black and White Women
Review of Black Political Economy 11,4 (Summer 1982): 429-439.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/a7jv5qr4542248j3/
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: National Economic Association
Keyword(s): Divorce; Employment; Marital Dissolution; Marital Status; Widows; Wives

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper reports on determinants of annual hours employed and labor force participation using the NLS of Mature Women. Labor force participation rates are considerably lower for women with young children. Labor supply is predicted for white and black women, married spouse present and widowed, divorced, and separated, for 1969, 1971, and 1974. Black and white women are found to have inelastic labor supply, but with increasing elasticity from 1969 to 1974. White married women decrease their annual hours of work in response to an increase in husband's earnings to a greater extent than black married women.
Bibliography Citation
Hoffman, Emily P. "Comparative Labor Supply of Black and White Women." Review of Black Political Economy 11,4 (Summer 1982): 429-439.
10. Loving, Ajamu C.
Finke, Michael S.
Salter, John R.
Explaining the 2004 Decrease in Minority Stock Ownership
The Review of Black Political Economy 39,4 (December 2012): 403-425.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12114-012-9132-8
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Assets; I.Q.; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Prior literature has examined minority stock market participation and found that it increased rapidly throughout the 1990’s and into the early 2000’s. However, in 2004 after stock prices had suffered decline, Black and Hispanic market participation fell off sharply. This paper uses the NLSY79, a panel data set, to examine whether the diminished likelihood of Black and Hispanic 2004 market participation is due to race or variation in cognitive ability and investor experience. We find that IQ and investor experience subsume all racial effects in the likelihood of 2004 market participation.
Bibliography Citation
Loving, Ajamu C., Michael S. Finke and John R. Salter. "Explaining the 2004 Decrease in Minority Stock Ownership." The Review of Black Political Economy 39,4 (December 2012): 403-425.
11. Mauldin, Teresa A.
Koonce, Joan
The Effect of Human Capital on the Economic Status of Divorced and Separated Women: Differences by Race
The Review of Black Political Economy 18,4 (Spring 1990): 55-68.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/v216q141u35p7w4q/
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: National Economic Association
Keyword(s): Divorce; Educational Attainment; Human Capital Theory; Income; Marital Disruption; Racial Differences; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study investigated the impact of investments in human capital on the economic well-being of black and white women immediately following marital disruption. It also explored the extent to which the observed differences in income between the two groups were due to differences in the levels of qualities (endowments) or differences in the impact of these qualities (discrimination). The average differences in endowments explained almost two-thirds of the income gap between black and white women. Most of this explanatory power was due to differences in educational attainment, work experience, and region.
Bibliography Citation
Mauldin, Teresa A. and Joan Koonce. "The Effect of Human Capital on the Economic Status of Divorced and Separated Women: Differences by Race." The Review of Black Political Economy 18,4 (Spring 1990): 55-68.
12. Mauldin, Teresa A.
Mimura, Yoko
Exits from Poverty Among Rural and Urban Black, Hispanic, and White Young Adults
Review of Black Political Economy 29,1 (Summer 2001): 9-23.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/y5vqrl6tvnb4a1eu/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Ethnic Studies; Exits; Family Background; Hispanics; Human Capital; Poverty; Racial Differences; Racial Studies; Rural Sociology

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using the NLSY79 cohort data (1981-1993), we examined Black, Hispanic, and White young adults for their poverty exit rates as a function of the elapsed duration of the spell, family background characteristics, human capital, labor market factors, and other socio-demographic variables. There was no difference in exit rates between rural and urban residents or between Hispanic and Whites, ceteris paribus. At the baseline, Blacks had lower exit rates than Whites between the third and fourth years, and the gap was greater when the respondents lived in the north central region of the United States and when they were not employed.
Bibliography Citation
Mauldin, Teresa A. and Yoko Mimura. "Exits from Poverty Among Rural and Urban Black, Hispanic, and White Young Adults." Review of Black Political Economy 29,1 (Summer 2001): 9-23.
13. McCrate, Elaine
Labor Market Segmentation and Relative Black/White Teenage Birth Rates
Review of Black Political Economy 18,4 (Spring 1990): 37-53.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/y2483713p10322vp/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Economic Association
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Affirmative Action; Birth Rate; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Labor Market Segmentation; Labor Market, Secondary; Mothers, Adolescent; Poverty; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Teenage mothers typically have lower educational attainment than other women. Most observers have argued that this is a major reason for their greater risk of poverty. This article takes the opposite view: that circumstances associated with poverty contribute to a greater likelihood of teenage childbearing. In particular, poor educational quality and the chances of secondary sector employment are more common for black women, regardless of their age at first birth. Hence the payoffs to education may be quite low for these women, which may be the reason for early motherhood. This argument is presented in terms of segmented labor market theory. Data to support it is presented from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Other common explanations of teenage motherhood are critiqued.
Bibliography Citation
McCrate, Elaine. "Labor Market Segmentation and Relative Black/White Teenage Birth Rates." Review of Black Political Economy 18,4 (Spring 1990): 37-53.
14. McDaniel, Marla
Kuehn, Daniel
What Does a High School Diploma Get You? Employment, Race, and the Transition to Adulthood
The Review of Black Political Economy 40,4 (December 2013): 371-399.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12114-012-9147-1
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Employment; High School Completion/Graduates; High School Dropouts; Labor Force Participation; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Modeling, OLS; Racial Differences; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We compare the employment of African American and white youth as they transition to adulthood from age 18 to 22, focusing on high school graduates and high school dropouts who did not attend college. Using OLS and hazard models, we analyze the relative employment rates, and employment consistency, stability, and timing, controlling for a number of factors including family income, academic aptitude, prior work experience, and neighborhood poverty. We find white high school graduates work significantly more than all other youth on most measures; African American high school graduates work as much and sometimes less than white high school dropouts; African American dropouts work significantly less than all other youth. Findings further suggest that the improved labor market participation associated with a high school diploma is higher over time for African Americans than for white youth.
Bibliography Citation
McDaniel, Marla and Daniel Kuehn. "What Does a High School Diploma Get You? Employment, Race, and the Transition to Adulthood." The Review of Black Political Economy 40,4 (December 2013): 371-399.
15. Meyer, Christine Siegwarth
Mukerjee, Swati
Black Teen Childbearing: Reexamining the Segmented Labor Market Hypothesis
Review of Black Political Economy 27,4 (Spring 2000): 27-42.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/k0cuv1efb22eynnw/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Economic Association
Keyword(s): Black Family; Childbearing, Adolescent; Labor Market Segmentation; Mothers, Race; Racial Differences; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examines relationship between racial difference in proportion of women who become teenage mothers and differences in labor options and choices; data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY); US.
Bibliography Citation
Meyer, Christine Siegwarth and Swati Mukerjee. "Black Teen Childbearing: Reexamining the Segmented Labor Market Hypothesis." Review of Black Political Economy 27,4 (Spring 2000): 27-42.
16. Mukerjee, Swati
Job Satisfaction in the United States: Are Blacks Still More Satisfied?
Review of Black Political Economy 41,1 (March 2014): 61-81.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12114-013-9174-6
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Discrimination; General Social Survey (GSS); Job Satisfaction; Racial Differences; Racial Equality/Inequality

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Despite the substantial literature on the paradox of the happy female worker, research has been sparse in investigating race differences in job satisfaction. The last national level study on racial differences in job satisfaction was done in 1981 when, using national level U.S. data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Mature Men for 1966, 1969 and 1971, Bartel showed that blacks had significantly more job satisfaction and further, that this racial gap had widened during this time. Though the reasons for this gap and its widening were not investigated, it was suggested, in a close parallel to the reason for the contented female worker, that lower expectations, in this case due to discrimination in the labor market, could be a reasonable explanation. Surprisingly, since then, there have been only a handful of studies focused on smaller, specific groups. This paper exploits two U.S. national level data sets, the GSS and the NLSY 1997, to examine the racial gap in job satisfaction. Simple means show that blacks are much less satisfied than whites and moreover, this difference has persisted not only across genders but also across almost four decades. To isolate the pure race effect, a sequential process is adopted by first examining the simple difference in the means of job satisfaction, then, through probit estimation, seeing the impact of individual attributes, finally progressing to incorporation of job attributes. Probit estimates give robust results. Blacks are significantly less satisfied than whites even when income, benefits and occupations are controlled. However, this racial gap is greater in the case of women and younger black men. An exploratory analysis shows that when discrimination is accounted for, the satisfaction gap is further reduced and the race coefficients are rendered insignificant. Estimates with comparison income show that the satisfaction gap is driven by perceived discrimination and not necessarily discrimination as captured by compariso n income. This highlights the importance of policy measures to reduce perceptual discrimination.
Bibliography Citation
Mukerjee, Swati. "Job Satisfaction in the United States: Are Blacks Still More Satisfied?" Review of Black Political Economy 41,1 (March 2014): 61-81.
17. Reid, Clifford E.
A Longitudinal Analysis of Racial Wage Differentials for Young Nonfarm Rural Workers
Review of Black Political Economy 18,4 (Spring 1990): 5-12.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/xnn03773274pt126/
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: National Economic Association
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Human Capital Theory; Racial Differences; Rural/Urban Differences; Wage Differentials

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A longitudinal data base is used to estimate racial wage differentials for young nonfarm rural workers for 1968, 1973, and 1978. The empirical results indicate the existence of large wage differentials between young white and young black nonfarm rural workers of both sexes. The results also indicate that the wage differential for young men has increased over time while the differential for young women has decreased slightly over time.
Bibliography Citation
Reid, Clifford E. "A Longitudinal Analysis of Racial Wage Differentials for Young Nonfarm Rural Workers." Review of Black Political Economy 18,4 (Spring 1990): 5-12.
18. Rodgers, William M., III
Spriggs, William E.
What Does the AFQT Really Measure: Race, Wages, Schooling and the AFQT Score
The Review of Black Political Economy 24,4 (Spring 1996): 13-46.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/52t6v2n352q01807/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Economic Association
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Discrimination, Job; Family Background; Family Environment; Job Skills; Racial Differences; School Quality; Schooling; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Wage Gap

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent literature on the black-white wage gap continues to show that a large residual due to race remains, and during the 1980s, it grew in size. One interpretation is that the residual gap measures the existence of labor market discrimination. Another interpretation is that imbedded in the residual gap are racial differences in unobservable skills that grew during the 1980s, or that racial differences in these skills remained constant, but their returns grew. To account for these unobservable skills, researchers switch to the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The NLSY contains the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT), a direct measure of skills obtained via family and school environments.When researchers include the AFQT composite score, the black-white wage gap narrows. Doing this, they assume that the AFQT score is a racially unbiased predictor of wages. We present evidence that generates doubt that the AFQT score is racially unbiased. We first show t hat F-Tests reject the hypothesis that AFQT scores equally predict African American and white wages. Further, when the components of the AFQT are used to predict wages, instead of the composite score, the coefficients on the verbal components are positive and significant for African Americans, while the coefficient on the math component is basically zero. The relationships for whites are exactly the opposites. Second, we show that a significant difference in the ability of family background, school quality, and a set of psychological characteristics to estimate black and white test scores exists. Third, we present our estimates of the black-white wage gap where a racially unbiased AFQT composite score has been used to control for racial differences in job skills. To construct this score, we estimate a regression of the AFQT scores of whites on an exhaustive list of family background, school quality, and individual psychological characteristics. When the two-step estimated score is used, it reduces the mean square error of the wage regression, has a significant independent effect on wages, and a very small effect on the race coefficient.
Bibliography Citation
Rodgers, William M., III and William E. Spriggs. "What Does the AFQT Really Measure: Race, Wages, Schooling and the AFQT Score." The Review of Black Political Economy 24,4 (Spring 1996): 13-46.
19. Stevans, Lonnie K.
Assessing the Effect of the Occupational Crowding of Immigrants on the Real Wages of African American Workers
Review of Black Political Economy 26,2 (Fall 1998): 37-46.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/abgmj8etxw8ht896/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Economic Association
Keyword(s): Displaced Workers; Immigrants; Labor Market Outcomes; Occupations; Skills; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Do immigrant workers cause the reduction of wages and the displacement of domestic workers? One response to this question holds that immigrants are in competition and are able to displace indigenous workers by working for lower wages--particularly in low-wage, less-skilled, labor markets. The opposing view, as noted by Simcox, posits the argument that non-U.S. citizen workers take employment that domestic workers would not accept and thus serve to preserve jobs and increase consumption levels. The recurring importance of the immigration issue has spurred renewed research interests to determine what impact, if any, immigration has on domestic labor markets--particularly the labor markets of unskilled workers.
Bibliography Citation
Stevans, Lonnie K. "Assessing the Effect of the Occupational Crowding of Immigrants on the Real Wages of African American Workers." Review of Black Political Economy 26,2 (Fall 1998): 37-46.
20. Williams, Donald R.
Job Characteristics and the Labor Force Participation Behavior of Black and White Male Youth
Review of Black Political Economy 18,2 (Fall 1989): 5-24.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/d81727155129280w/fulltext.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Economic Association
Keyword(s): Labor Force Participation; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Wages, Reservation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous work regarding the labor force participation of black and white youth has ignored the fact that they may face jobs with different characteristics, such as socioeconomic status or degree of danger. This article examines the effects that such characteristics have on the probability of participation for a sample of black and white males from the National Longitudinal Survey Youth Cohort. The results suggest that some job characteristics have a significant impact on participation, particularly socioeconomic status. The estimates presented here suggest, however, that racial differences in socioeconomic status probably explain only a small portion of the black-white male youth participation rate differential.
Bibliography Citation
Williams, Donald R. "Job Characteristics and the Labor Force Participation Behavior of Black and White Male Youth." Review of Black Political Economy 18,2 (Fall 1989): 5-24.