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Source: Research in Labor Economics, 1999-2007
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Gustman, Alan L.
Steinmeier, Thomas L.
Employer Provided Pension Data in the NLS Mature Women's Survey and in the Health and Retirement Study
Research in Labor Economics 19 (2000): 215-252
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Benefits; Health Factors; Pensions; Physical Characteristics; Retirement; Wealth

We compute pension wealth from employer provided pension plan descriptions matched to respondent surveys to the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women (NLS-MW) and the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). These calculations provide detailed information on the level and distribution of pension wealth and a variety of incentives from pensions. Differences between the pensions of men and women are largely explained by differences in earnings. However, there also are differences in the shapes of the pension accrual profiles of defined benefit plans that are likely to reflect the lower tenure of women. Pension coverage is lower in the NLS-MW than in the HRS. As a result, pension wealth is lower in the NLS-MW than in the HRS. But the difference in coverage is not due to the effects of pension matching. Pension values for covered respondents are similar between the NLS-MW and HRS surveys. Systematic differences between the surveys in the rate at which pensions were matched do not have a major effect on findings as to the levels and distributions of pension wealth between the surveys.
Bibliography Citation
Gustman, Alan L. and Thomas L. Steinmeier. "Employer Provided Pension Data in the NLS Mature Women's Survey and in the Health and Retirement Study." Research in Labor Economics 19 (2000): 215-252.
2. Lengermann, Paul Adrian
How Long Do the Benefits of Training Last? Evidence of Long Term Effects Across Current and Previous Employers
Research in Labor Economics 18 (1999): 439-461
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Cost-Benefit Studies; Demography; Educational Attainment; High School Dropouts; Human Capital; Occupational Attainment; Schooling; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Training; Training, Employee; Training, Occupational; Training, On-the-Job; Unemployment Rate, Regional; Wage Growth

This article uses NLSY data from 1979-1993 to estimate training's effect on one year wage growth. Year-by-year training histories are constructed which allow the returns to training received at both current and previous employers to vary over time. The time patterns of the returns to training are constructed for both long and short spells of training over nine and three year periods respectively. These returns are then estimated for different demographic groups in order to see how education level, test scores, and occupation influence the payoff to training. Both company training and formal schooling were associated with significant wage growth even nine years after they occurred. Company training was associated with significant wage growth effects irrespective of whether workers changed jobs, although wage growth was higher when the training occurred at a previous employer. Contrary to the conventional human capital model, employers appear to be sharing the costs and returns of general training. While training incidence was lowest for high school dropouts, their return to getting training was the highest. College graduates, in contrast, received the most training but benefited the least. These results suggest an under-supply of training opportunities for low skilled workers
Bibliography Citation
Lengermann, Paul Adrian. "How Long Do the Benefits of Training Last? Evidence of Long Term Effects Across Current and Previous Employers." Research in Labor Economics 18 (1999): 439-461.