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Source: Research in Higher Education
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Choi, Yool
Student Employment and Persistence: Evidence of Effect Heterogeneity of Student Employment on College Dropout
Research in Higher Education 59,1 (February 2018): 88-107.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11162-017-9458-y
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): College Dropouts; Employment, In-School; Heterogeneity; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study explores how student employment affects college persistence and how these effects differ by individual likelihood of participating in student employment. I analyze data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 using propensity score matching and stratification-multilevel analysis. This study finds that engaging in intense work has deleterious effects on college persistence. However, these negative effects vary significantly according to likelihood of participation in intense work. The results indicate that employment has less negative impacts on completion for those most likely to participate in intense work, who are typically those from the most disadvantaged social backgrounds. This finding suggests that efforts to reduce the deleterious effects of intense work on persistence should be practiced with careful consideration for sub-populations that may have different reasons for and effects of student employment.
Bibliography Citation
Choi, Yool. "Student Employment and Persistence: Evidence of Effect Heterogeneity of Student Employment on College Dropout." Research in Higher Education 59,1 (February 2018): 88-107.
2. Jez, Su Jin
The Differential Impact of Wealth Versus Income in the College-Going Process
Research in Higher Education 55,7 (November 2014): 710-734.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11162-014-9332-0
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): College Characteristics; College Enrollment; Colleges; Income; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

College is increasingly essential for economic and social mobility. Current research and public policy devotes significant attention to race, income, and socioeconomic factors in college access. Yet, wealth's role, as differentiated from income, is largely unexplored. This paper examines the differences between wealth and income in the college-going process, specifically applying to college, attending college, and what type of college attended (2-year, 4-year, and more or less selective). To examine these relationships, the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (1997) is linked to the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System to create a nationally representative dataset. Binary and multinomial logistic regressions reveal that wealth is consistently more significant in the college choice process than income. Wealth's significance as a predictor for college application and attending a 2-year college versus no college disappears when controls for human capital, habitus, social capital, and cultural capital are added. However, wealth's significance persists for less selective and more selective 4-year college attendance, even after including these controls. K-12 and postsecondary institutions and policymakers, looking to level the playing field and make college more accessible, must address wealth's impact on the college-going process.
Bibliography Citation
Jez, Su Jin. "The Differential Impact of Wealth Versus Income in the College-Going Process." Research in Higher Education 55,7 (November 2014): 710-734.
3. Kim, Kyung-Nyun
Baker, Rose M.
The Assumed Benefits and Hidden Costs of Adult Learners' College Enrollment
Research in Higher Education 56,5 (August 2015): 510-533.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11162-014-9351-x
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): College Characteristics; College Enrollment; Occupational Status; Self-Esteem; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study investigates the effects of adults' enrollment in and graduation from a two-year college on their hourly wages and occupational status in U.S. by employing a growth curve model and a piecewise model. College enrollment reduced hourly wages and occupational status by 13.8 % and 2.74 points, respectively. Less-educated workers whose wages were the main source of income were more likely to compromise their occupational status for a better work-study balance and thus to realize wage penalties during schooling. While a two-year college degree acquired in adulthood had significant positive effects on hourly wages and occupational status, the said positive economic returns from the degree were moderated by their self-esteem.
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Kyung-Nyun and Rose M. Baker. "The Assumed Benefits and Hidden Costs of Adult Learners' College Enrollment." Research in Higher Education 56,5 (August 2015): 510-533.
4. Luthra, Renee
Flashman, Jennifer A.
Yammer Microsoft
Who Benefits Most from a University Degree?: A Cross-National Comparison of Selection and Wage Returns in the US, UK, and Germany
Research in Higher Education 58,8 (December 2017): 843-878.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11162-017-9451-5
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): College Degree; Cross-national Analysis; Educational Returns; German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP); NCDS - National Child Development Study (British); Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent research on economic returns to higher education in the United States suggests that those with the highest wage returns to a college degree are least likely to obtain one. We extend the study of heterogeneous returns to tertiary education across multiple institutional contexts, investigating how the relationship between wage returns and the propensity to complete a degree varies by the level of expansion, differentiation, and cost of higher education. Drawing on panel data and matching techniques, we compare findings from the US with selection into degree completion in Germany and the UK. Contrary to previous studies, we find little evidence for population level heterogeneity in economic returns to higher education.
Bibliography Citation
Luthra, Renee, Jennifer A. Flashman and Yammer Microsoft. "Who Benefits Most from a University Degree?: A Cross-National Comparison of Selection and Wage Returns in the US, UK, and Germany." Research in Higher Education 58,8 (December 2017): 843-878.
5. Shamsuddin, Shomon
Berkeley or Bust? Estimating the Causal Effect of College Selectivity on Bachelor's Degree Completion
Research in Higher Education 57,7 (November 2016): 795-822.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11162-016-9408-0
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): College Characteristics; College Degree; College Enrollment; Educational Attainment; Geocoded Data; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Many students enroll in less selective colleges than they are qualified to attend, despite low graduation rates at these institutions. Some scholars have argued that qualified students should enroll in the most selective colleges because they have greater resources to support student success. However, selective college attendance is endogenous, so student outcomes could be due to individual ability, not institutional characteristics. Previous work on college selectivity has focused on the earnings effects of attending elite private universities, overlooking both college graduation impacts and the public institutions that educate most students. I estimate the effect of selective colleges on the probability of bachelor's degree completion using a restricted-access national dataset and an instrumental variables approach to address the endogeneity of college choice. I find that a 100-point increase in the average SAT score for admitted students is associated with an increase in the probability of graduation by 13 percentage points. In addition, I find suggestive evidence that enrolling in a selective public college has a positive effect on degree completion. The results are robust to a series of sensitivity tests and alternate specifications. The findings suggest strong benefits to enrolling in the most selective colleges that students are qualified to attend and have important implications for decisions to pursue postsecondary education in the face of high student loan debt.
Bibliography Citation
Shamsuddin, Shomon. "Berkeley or Bust? Estimating the Causal Effect of College Selectivity on Bachelor's Degree Completion." Research in Higher Education 57,7 (November 2016): 795-822.
6. Stephenson, Stanley P., Jr.
Work in College and Subsequent Wage Rates
Research in Higher Education 17,2 (1982): 165-178.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/j84j53x611145u24/
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Schooling; Transition, School to Work; Wage Rates

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This is an empirical study of early postenrollment wage determinants of white young men in the 1966 to 1971 period. Data are from the National Longitudinal Survey for young men. The focus is on student labor force status as a determinant of postenrollment wage rates. As such, the results are related to the combined employment and college enrollment goal expressed repeatedly in federal work-study programs from the 1930s to date. Results suggest that work while enrolled may not only support the student, but mitigate transition problems to full-time work after enrollment. The major result, found with OLS multiple regression techniques, is that student job holding significantly and positively increased postenrollment wage rates relative to youth who neither worked nor looked for work as students. This indirect effect implies that the social cost of the college work-study program may be less than the federal outlays if the extra work experience enables a youth to obtain a more productive and higher paying job after enrollment.
Bibliography Citation
Stephenson, Stanley P., Jr. "Work in College and Subsequent Wage Rates." Research in Higher Education 17,2 (1982): 165-178.
7. Stephenson, Stanley P., Jr.
Eisele, Tura W.
The Impact of Financial Aid on Women's Demand for Higher Education
Research in Higher Education 17,4 (December 1982): 345-361.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/n510840817156303/
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): Educational Costs; Family Background; Marital Status; Tuition

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The Educational Amendments of 1972 marked a new direction in public policy regarding the scope and purpose of financial aid to higher education. Aid became more "student-oriented," and equality of opportunity for higher education became a goal. This empirical study with national longitudinal data has made a start in policy evaluation of the effect of the 1972 Educational Amendments on the higher education acquired by young women. The most important result of financial aid receipt for young women is that those who received aid averaged 0.64 more years completed of higher education and averaged .145 greater graduation probability than similar women who did not receive aid. These results were obtained in multiple regression models in which the effects of marital status, parental background, geographic locations and economic characteristics, and tuition level were controlled for. These results suggest that policy attempts to stimulate the higher education acquired by enrolled young women by increasing the availability of financial aid are well-founded.
Bibliography Citation
Stephenson, Stanley P., Jr. and Tura W. Eisele. "The Impact of Financial Aid on Women's Demand for Higher Education." Research in Higher Education 17,4 (December 1982): 345-361.
8. Taniguchi, Hiromi
The Influence of Age at Degree Completion on College Wage Premiums
Research in Higher Education 46,8 (December 2005): 861-881.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/y655468834k51j08/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Keyword(s): College Education; College Graduates; Education, Adult; Educational Returns; Gender Differences; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Wage Growth; Wage Models

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although studies have shown a significant wage gain associated with the possession of a college degree, few have considered at what age the degree was received to estimate this college wage premium. Given the recent increase in the enrollment of older students, this study examines how the size of the premium is affected by college timing while focusing on a possible gender difference. Results from fixed-effects models show that those who complete their degree at 25 or older receive a significantly lower premium than those who graduate at a younger age, while the penalty for late graduation is much smaller for women than men. A further analysis suggests that the late college penalty is partly due to the delayed onset of the cumulative benefits higher education provides, and that women are penalized less for late degree completion because they gain less from college education over the course of time to begin with.
Bibliography Citation
Taniguchi, Hiromi. "The Influence of Age at Degree Completion on College Wage Premiums." Research in Higher Education 46,8 (December 2005): 861-881.