Search Results

Source: psychiatry research
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Levine, Stephen Z.
Low Birth-Weight and Risk for Major Depression: A Community-based Longitudinal Study
Psychiatry Research 215,3 (30 March 2014): 618-623.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165178114000444
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Birthweight; CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Pre-natal Care/Exposure

The current study examines the association between low birth weight and risk for major depression from early adolescence to early adulthood. It accounts for eight documented confounders, and depression within families. Data were analyzed from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 on mothers and offspring. Major depression was assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale Short-Form (CES-D-SF) among offspring (N=3398) biannually, from 2000 to 2010 (aged 14–25). Competing models were examined with survival analysis and Generalized Estimated Equations (GEE). CES-D-SF based major depression was reported by 33.46% (n=1137) of participants. Among persons with very low birth weight (<1500 g), 47.5% (n=19/40) were classified with CES-D-SF depression (OR=1.81, 95% CI=0.97, 3.39). Similar results were found with survival analysis (HR=1.97, 95% CI=0.97, 4.01). Among multiple offspring families, GEE modeling showed a similar trend. On aggregate (unadjusted OR=2.46, 95% CI=1.07, 5.63; adjusted OR=2.43, 95% CI=0.94, 6.23), and within families of mothers with CES-D-SF depression (unadjusted OR=2.54, 95% CI=0.55, 11.66; adjusted OR=1.79, 95% CI=0.28, 11.42). Compelling evidence is lacking in favor of an association between very low birth weight (<1,500 g), and suspected major depression from early adolescence to early adulthood after accounting for documented confounders.
Bibliography Citation
Levine, Stephen Z. "Low Birth-Weight and Risk for Major Depression: A Community-based Longitudinal Study." Psychiatry Research 215,3 (30 March 2014): 618-623.
2. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Maternal Alcohol Use Disorders and Depression in Emerging Adulthood: Examining the Relevance of Social Ties, Childhood Adversity, and Socioeconomic Status
Psychiatry Research 257 (November 2017): 441-445.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165178116314226
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Depression (see also CESD); Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Parental Influences; Social Environment; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

A number of recent studies have found that alcohol use disorders (AUDs) among parents are associated with higher levels of depression in their adult children. However, these studies have not considered whether several important social conditions in childhood help explain this association. Using a large sample of young adults from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979 Children and Young Adults (NLSY79-CY), this study examines changes in the relationship between maternal AUDs and depression in emerging adulthood after controlling for three clusters of variables related to childhood social ties, adversity, and socioeconomic status. After models adjust for these factors, the association is reduced but maternal AUDs remain a robust predictor of depression in emerging adulthood. These findings highlight the intergenerational consequences of AUDs and the need to develop interventions that supplement children's social support and economic circumstances.
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D. "Maternal Alcohol Use Disorders and Depression in Emerging Adulthood: Examining the Relevance of Social Ties, Childhood Adversity, and Socioeconomic Status." Psychiatry Research 257 (November 2017): 441-445.
3. Wood, Alex M.
Taylor, Peter J.
Joseph, Stephen
Does the CES-D Measure a Continuum from Depression to Happiness? Comparing Substantive and Artifactual Models
Psychiatry Research 177,1-2 (15 May 2010):120-123.
Also: http://www.psy-journal.com/article/S0165-1781(10)00049-1/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Scale Construction; Wisconsin Longitudinal Study/H.S. Panel Study (WLS)

The Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CES-D) is one of the five most frequently used measures of depressive experiences. Previous research has suggested that the scale may consist of two separate factors of happiness and depression, respectively. However, recent methodological research has demonstrated that standard factor analysis cannot be used in this situation to demonstrate such factors are substantive. The substantive factor structure of the CES-D was therefore tested with two samples of younger (N = 8857; age range 27–35) and older (N = 6125; age range 64–65) people. Using a recent correction to CFA, we demonstrate that a two factor structure arises through purely artifactual reasons, and that the CES-D actually has only one substantive factor, providing evidence for a single continuum ranging from happiness to depression.
Bibliography Citation
Wood, Alex M., Peter J. Taylor and Stephen Joseph. "Does the CES-D Measure a Continuum from Depression to Happiness? Comparing Substantive and Artifactual Models ." Psychiatry Research 177,1-2 (15 May 2010):120-123.