Search Results

Source: OhioLINK
Resulting in 12 citations.
1. Cruz, Julissa
The Influence of Wealth on Repartnering
Master's Thesis, Department of Sociology, Bowling Green State University, 2013.
Also: https://etd.ohiolink.edu/pg_10?::NO:10:P10_ETD_SUBID:5266
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: OhioLINK
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Divorce; Remarriage; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study draws on the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) 1979 cohort to examine how and why wealth influences repartnering among men and women who have experienced their first divorce. The high concentration of wealth in the top 1% of Americans (Kennickell 2006), as well as the high divorce and repartnering rates in the U.S. make this topic timely. Indeed, this investigation can better illuminate mechanisms driving disparities in repartnering. By testing the competing theories of union formation (specialization hypothesis versus marital timing theory) and the competing theories on the importance of wealth (symbolic value versus economic value), the findings from this study provide a more in-depth understanding of repartnering in the U.S. The results of the current study find that wealth is significantly associated with repartnering for men and women, even after controlling for various socioeconomic variables. Wealth ownership was found to encourage repartnering, especially remarriage, for both men and women. This finding provides support for Oppenheimer's marital timing theory. Finally, results provide tentative support for the argument that the symbolic value of wealth is becoming more important for union formation than the economic value of wealth among men, but not among women.
Bibliography Citation
Cruz, Julissa. The Influence of Wealth on Repartnering. Master's Thesis, Department of Sociology, Bowling Green State University, 2013..
2. Cunha, Andrea Cristina
The Effects of Clinical Depression on Schooling and Wages
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, The Ohio State University, 1997.
Also: https://etd.ohiolink.edu/pg_10?::NO:10:P10_ETD_SUBID:71189#abstract-files
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: OhioLINK
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Educational Returns; High School Completion/Graduates; Wage Equations; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, I test the propositions of the model applicable to the schooling period by estimating the effects of depression on the individual's probability of completing high school. I find that on average, the presence of depression decreases the predicted probability of high school completion of males by eighteen percent, and the predicted probability of high school completion of females by twenty one percent. I test the propositions of the model applicable to the working period by estimating a wage equation that includes a measure of depression and a schooling-depression interaction term. The results indicate that depression decreases wages. At the mean schooling level, and at mean levels of depression for the depressed and the nondepressed, wages earned by the nondepressed males and females exceed those earned by their depressed counterparts by thirty six percent. Returns to schooling are also negatively affected by depression; on average, the returns to each year of schooling are nine percent higher for nondepressed males and females than for their depressed counterparts.
Bibliography Citation
Cunha, Andrea Cristina. The Effects of Clinical Depression on Schooling and Wages. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, The Ohio State University, 1997..
3. de Medeiros, Ian
Keeping Up with The Joneses: Income Inequality's Effect of Mental Health
Master's Thesis, Department of Economics, Miami University, 2017.
Also: https://etd.ohiolink.edu/pg_10?::NO:10:P10_ETD_SUBID:152204#abstract-files
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: OhioLINK
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Health, Mental; Income

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Despite the large number of papers that investigate the linkage between income inequality and physical health, research on the linkage between income inequality and mental health has been sparse. Furthermore, the mental health and income inequality literature focuses primarily on national- and state-level income inequality, generally ignoring the sub-state level. I attempt to fill this gap in the literature by combining mental health and demographic data from the 1997 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth with state and county income data samples from the U.S. Census Bureau in order to investigate the effect of county-level income inequality on individual mental health. Results indicate that county-level income inequality has modest non-linear effects on individual mental health, with more equal counties being affected more by increases in inequality and increases in income inequality in unequal counties may even improve individual mental health. However, after controlling for unobservable individual characteristics, income inequality has no effect on mental health suggesting that previous models in the literature are inadequate.
Bibliography Citation
de Medeiros, Ian. Keeping Up with The Joneses: Income Inequality's Effect of Mental Health. Master's Thesis, Department of Economics, Miami University, 2017..
4. Han, Shijie
Essays on Health Economics
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, The Ohio State University, 2017.
Also: https://etd.ohiolink.edu/pg_10?::NO:10:P10_ETD_SUBID:149926
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: OhioLINK
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Debt/Borrowing; Health Care; Insurance, Health; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The first chapter examines the effects of the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) provision, which requires insurers to allow dependents to remain on parental health insurance policies until age 26, on a variety of outcomes among college graduates with student loan debt. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, in which the majority of the sample were unable to benefit from the provision due to the age restriction, we find larger student loan debt is associated with a lower probability of having health insurance, and lower utilization of routine checkups as well as doctor visits in time of sickness. Using data from the Panel Survey of Income Dynamics, we find that among college graduates who were eligible for the provision, having more student loan debt increases the likelihood of joining a parental health insurance plan. We also estimate a difference-in-difference model and find that for the average college graduate in the sample, being eligible for the provision increased the likelihood of having health insurance by 9.8 percentage points more after 2010. Finally, we use college-level data from the College Scorecard to estimate the impact of the provision on college graduates' financial outcomes in a fixed effects model identified by changes in the age distributions of students across cohorts which changes the average eligibility rates over time. We find that at the college level, a higher percentage of people satisfying the age criterion of the provision in the cohort led to a decrease in student loan default rate and an increase in student loan repayment rate after 2010.
Bibliography Citation
Han, Shijie. Essays on Health Economics. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, The Ohio State University, 2017..
5. Makarios, Matthew
Reconceptualizing Crime as an Independent Variable: The Social and Personal Consequences of Criminal Involvement
Ph.D. Dissertation, School of Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati, 2009.
Also: https://etd.ohiolink.edu/pg_10?::NO:10:P10_ETD_SUBID:82767#abstract-files
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: OhioLINK
Keyword(s): Crime; Criminal Justice System; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Social Emotional Development; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

As a discipline, criminology has long focused its attention on explaining crime and has thus placed crime almost exclusively as an outcome. As a result, little attention has been paid to the effect that criminal involvement has on other social domains, such as education, work, and relationships. To do so, criminal behavior must be understood as one of several social domains that interact within the broader context of social development. Grounded in this developmental perspective, this research used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997, to examine the consequences of adolescent criminal involvement on social development in early adulthood. The results provide substantial support for the suggested relationships. That is, measures of adolescent delinquency, drug use, and gang membership were found to have significant impacts on adult social outcomes. Adolescent delinquency in particular was shown to have the most consistent effects on measures from the domains of education / employment, health, and social activities. Adolescent criminal involvement, however, had little influence on measures from the domain of social relationships. Support was also shown for indirect effects of adolescent criminal involvement because of associations between social outcomes. That is, criminal involvement in adolescence impacted adult social outcomes through its effect on other social outcomes that existed earlier in the developmental sequence.
Bibliography Citation
Makarios, Matthew. Reconceptualizing Crime as an Independent Variable: The Social and Personal Consequences of Criminal Involvement. Ph.D. Dissertation, School of Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati, 2009..
6. Munk, Robert Owen
Essays on Business Ownership and Self-Employment
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, The Ohio State University, 2016.
Also: https://etd.ohiolink.edu/pg_10?::NO:10:P10_ETD_SUBID:116346
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: OhioLINK
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Entrepreneurship; Marriage; Self-Employed Workers; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This dissertation contains three chapters on self-employment and business ownership. In the first chapter, I re-examine the earnings differential between self- and wage-employed men. Using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, I find that the timing and (voluntary or involuntary) nature of men's transitions into self-employment are important determinants of whether they receive wage-gains. I find that when a man transitions from wage-employment to self-employment voluntarily and early in his career, his wage is predicted to increase contemporaneously by 31%. The magnitude of this increase is 2.6 times larger than the predicted wage change associated with a voluntary, early-career transition to a new wage job. Conversely, I find that when a man transitions from wage-employment to self-employment involuntarily and late in his career, his predicted wage decreases contemporaneously by 18%. The magnitude of this decrease is larger than the predicted 13% wage decrease associated with an involuntary, late career transition to a new wage job.

In the second chapter, motivated by the finding that partnered men and women are more likely to become business owners than are their single counterparts, I ask whether the observed marriage and cohabitation effects are a result of partner income. Using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, I first show that when partner income is included as a control, the marriage and cohabitation effects decrease substantially for women, while the effects persist for men. Second, I show that the marriage and cohabitation effects vary with partner income for women but not men. For example, a woman whose husband's income is in the fifth quintile is 1.9 times more likely to transition to business ownership than a woman whose husband’s income is in the second quintile for men. On the other hand, a married man with a high-income wife is no more or less likely to transition to business ownership than a married man with a low-income wife.

In the third chapter, re-examine Lazear's (2005) jack-of-all-trades theory. Using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, I ask, what are the wage gains associated with a self-employed worker's prior occupational experience? Overall, I find results consistent with Lazear's theory, which suggests that the returns to occupational specialization are substantially larger for wage workers than the self-employed. I predict that self-employed workers with ten years of prior occupational experience earn a wage that is only 3.2% greater than do self-employed workers with two years of prior occupational experience. However, for wage workers I predict that the wage gains associated with a ten year increase in prior occupational experience (zero to ten years) is 2.1 times larger than the wage gains associated with a two year increase (zero to two years) in prior occupational experience.

Bibliography Citation
Munk, Robert Owen. Essays on Business Ownership and Self-Employment. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, The Ohio State University, 2016..
7. Payne, Krista K.
Marital Timing and Earnings over the Life Course
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, Bowling Green State University, 2012.
Also: https://etd.ohiolink.edu/pg_10?::NO:10:P10_ETD_SUBID:49843
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: OhioLINK
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Earnings; Gender Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using twenty waves of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, spanning twenty-four years, this study examines the economic antecedents of marital timing and the effect of marrying early, on-time, or late on individual earnings over time separately by gender.
Bibliography Citation
Payne, Krista K. Marital Timing and Earnings over the Life Course. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, Bowling Green State University, 2012..
8. Sanderson, Zachary W.
Burning a Hole in Your Pocket: the Effect of Smoking Cigarettes on Wages
Master's Thesis, Department of Economics, Miami University, 2018.
Also: https://etd.ohiolink.edu/pg_10?::NO:10:P10_ETD_SUBID:174792
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: OhioLINK
Keyword(s): Modeling, OLS; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study measures the impact of smoking on wages for young adults, aged 18 to 30. Economic theory would suggest that smoking can potentially carry a negative wage effect. Smoking carries a number of health effects that have the ability to decrease a person's productivity, reducing their marginal product of labor. Economic theory states that employers set a worker's wage at the marginal product of labor. Therefore, if an individual experiences decreased productivity due to smoking, they theoretically could have a low wage. By applying OLS and first differences methods to individual and sibling pair cross-section data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and following the research method outlined in Levine et al. (1997), I find that smoking cigarettes does not have a statistically significant impact on the wages of young adults. The point estimates from the OLS and first differences models lie between 6% and 11%, which match the results of previous studies that have found between a 4% and 11% negative wage effect associated with smoking. These results are confirmed by a series of robustness tests. In addition, the results of the OLS and first difference models are extremely similar to the results obtained by Levine et al., who find a statistically significant negative wage effect associated with smoking. The fact that my results line up with previous literature may suggest that smoking does carry a negative wage effect. This paper adds to the current literature by providing more research on the effects of smoking on a younger population, as well as providing more research to help validate the results of Levine et al. (1997).
Bibliography Citation
Sanderson, Zachary W. Burning a Hole in Your Pocket: the Effect of Smoking Cigarettes on Wages. Master's Thesis, Department of Economics, Miami University, 2018..
9. Tanda, Rika
Early Life Environments and Cognitive-Behavioral Outcomes of Children: A Life Course Approach
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Nursing, The Ohio State University, 2013.
Also: https://etd.ohiolink.edu/pg_10?::NO:10:P10_ETD_SUBID:2765
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: OhioLINK
Keyword(s): Children, Behavioral Development; Cognitive Ability; Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Obesity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The first chapter introduces a life course model used throughout this dissertation study. This is followed by a review in chapter 2 of risk factors that are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes during childhood. This chapter ascertains the fact that risk factors for shaping one's health are present throughout one's life course and that early life adverse environment may play an important role setting up one's health trajectory. In the subsequent two chapters, the association between maternal prepregnancy obesity and the offspring's cognitive and behavioral outcomes are examined using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth.
Bibliography Citation
Tanda, Rika. Early Life Environments and Cognitive-Behavioral Outcomes of Children: A Life Course Approach. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Nursing, The Ohio State University, 2013..
10. Uzdavines, Alex
Stressful Events and Religious Identities: Investigating the Risk of Radical Accommodation
M.A. Thesis, Department of Psychological Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, 2017.
Also: https://etd.ohiolink.edu/pg_10?::NO:10:P10_ETD_SUBID:151126
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: OhioLINK
Keyword(s): Religious Influences; Stress

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

At some point in their lives, everyone will experience a stressful life event. Usually, someone can cope with and make meaning from the event. However, the body of research investigating the impact of severe and/or chronic exposure to stressful life events on the brain shows that harmful effects of stress exposure accumulate. Considering the extant literature regarding religious meaning making in light of these findings and the robust literature on spiritual transformation following stressful life events, I developed three hypotheses: 1) stressful life events increase risk of (non)religious ID change, 2) earlier events continued to impact later ID changes, and 3) risk of ID change was similar across change groups. This study analyzed a nationally representative longitudinal dataset of US children born between 1980 and 1984 (N = 8984). The final analyses used multiple imputation to account for missing data and did not find evidence supporting the hypotheses.
Bibliography Citation
Uzdavines, Alex. Stressful Events and Religious Identities: Investigating the Risk of Radical Accommodation. M.A. Thesis, Department of Psychological Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, 2017..
11. White, Kenneth J.
Social Capital, Financial Planning, and Black Males
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Consumer Sciences, The Ohio State University, 2016.
Also: https://etd.ohiolink.edu/pg_10?::NO:10:P10_ETD_SUBID:116146
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: OhioLINK
Keyword(s): Financial Behaviors/Decisions; Racial Differences; Social Capital

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The objective of this study is to explore whether trends in data that suggest social relationships are related to financial planning behaviors. I draw from social capital theory to define the relationships and resources analyzed. Social capital theory is most effective in producing information channels and knowledge exchanges that may influence individuals to practice certain normative financial behaviors. The financial behaviors analyzed as outcome measures are topics set forth by the Certified Financial Planner Board as comprehensive financial planning topical areas.

For this study, I use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Young Adult (NLSY79YA) surveys. I analyze data on Black, Hispanic, and White males in 2008, 2010, and 2012 for the NLSY79 and in 2006, 2008, and 2012 for the NLSY79 Young Adult survey. Due to limitations of the social capital and financial outcome variables available in the surveys, I primarily use multiple years of cross-sectional data to explore and analyze the relationships between social capital and financial planning.

Bibliography Citation
White, Kenneth J. Social Capital, Financial Planning, and Black Males. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Consumer Sciences, The Ohio State University, 2016..
12. Woldoff, Rachael A.
What We Have and Where We Live: Race, Wealth, and Neighborhood Locational Attainment
Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 2003.
Also: http://www.ohiolink.edu.proxy.lib.ohio-state.edu/etd/send-pdf.cgi/Woldoff%20Rachael%20A.%20M.A.pdf?acc%5Fnum=osu1059767902
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: OhioLINK
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Census of Population; Ethnic Differences; Family Characteristics; Geocoded Data; Hispanic Studies; Home Ownership; Human Capital; Neighborhood Effects; Racial Differences; Residence; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Most Americans want to live in quality neighborhoods, but there are great disparities in the characteristics of residential communities across the United States. Why do some households live in better neighborhoods than others? Specifically, why do African American and Latino households live in neighborhoods that are demographically different from those of whites with similar incomes? Part of the answer may be that individual levels of economic resources--such as wealth--improve the chances of living in a neighborhood that is congruent with one's economic profile. This research examines the impact of wealth, other individual characteristics (location, family of origin, human capital, and current family characteristics) on residential neighborhood attributes using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and residential neighborhood data from the U.S. Census. I use OLS regression to study the importance of explanatory variables--particularly wealth--in predicting three forms of locational attainment: neighborhood racial/ethnic composition, neighborhood socioeconomic status, and neighborhood stability. The results show that wealthier individuals have more access to neighborhoods with representative distributions of whites, higher incomes, and greater homeownership. The locational returns to individual characteristics vary by group and outcome, but Latinos have the most consistent locational returns. In general, the findings for Latinos show consistent support for the spatial assimilation model, while the results are more mixed for African Americans. Consistent with place stratification, this study finds that education, employment, and family stability often increase African Americans' spatial assimilation, but not to the same extent as Latinos. Additional support for this model comes from examining wealth, a characteristic that significantly predicts residential location for all groups. Being able to secure a home in a good community is an important goal f or most people in this country. This research has important implications for understanding the determinants of individuals' residential outcomes and the role wealth plays in those outcomes. Given that research has documented racial/ethnic differences in residential outcomes, this research has timely and relevant implications for understanding why the divergences in racial residential patterns are so pronounced and whether racial/ethnic differences in wealth help to explain these patterns.

Available online via OhioLINK's ETD Center: http://newfirstsearch.oclc.org/

Bibliography Citation
Woldoff, Rachael A. What We Have and Where We Live: Race, Wealth, and Neighborhood Locational Attainment. Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 2003..