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Source: Office of Population Research, Princeton University
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Alon, Sigal
Donahoe, Debra
Tienda, Marta
The Effects on Early Work Experience on Young Women's Labor Force Attachment
Working Paper No. 2000-4, Office of Population Research, Princeton University, June 2000.
Also: http://opr.princeton.edu/papers/opr0004.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Office of Population Research, Princeton University
Keyword(s): Educational Returns; Employment; Gender Differences; Job Turnover; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Outcomes; Labor Supply; Life Course; Work Attachment; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examines labor force instability during the early life course, to assess conditions conducive to establishment of stable labor force careers, and in turn, whether and how much early experiences influence subsequent outcomes; since 1979; US. Based on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Our analyses contribute to the broader debate about whether and how much early labor force experiences influence subsequent labor force outcomes. Within this debate, we make several important refinements. First, we shift the focus from young men to young women. With few exceptions, most studies that attempt to establish links between early work experiences and subsequent adult outcomes focus on men (e.g., Hotz et al., 1997; Meyer and Wise, 1982; Topel and Ward, 1992; for a recent exception, see Chaplin and Hannaway, 1996). There are compelling reasons why the influence of early work experiences on adult market outcomes would differ by sex. The most obvious of these is the timing and influence of family responsibilities on women's work and school options (Ahituv and Tienda, 1997). Second, we broaden the outcome of interest from unemployment (or, the probability of employment at a given age) to the establishment of stable work careers. Third, we consider not only the quantity of early labor force experience, but its timing and quality as well. To this end, we examine how the accumulation of work experience - that is, whether it is acquired continuously or discontinuously - influences adult labor market attachment. Results show that all three aspects of early experience influence mature women's market attachment, namely the amount of experience accumulated; the timing of work experience; and the quality of that experience. Above and beyond these experience measures, we also find that background factors also influence adult women's attachment to the market.
Bibliography Citation
Alon, Sigal, Debra Donahoe and Marta Tienda. "The Effects on Early Work Experience on Young Women's Labor Force Attachment." Working Paper No. 2000-4, Office of Population Research, Princeton University, June 2000.
2. Alon, Sigal
Tienda, Marta
Employment and Wage Consequences of Young Women's Labor Force and Job Transitions
Working Paper No. 2000-1, Office of Population Research, Princeton University, May 2000.
Also: http://opr.princeton.edu/papers/opr0001.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Office of Population Research, Princeton University
Keyword(s): Educational Returns; Employment; Family Structure; Gender Differences; Hispanics; Job Turnover; Life Course; Mobility, Economic; Racial Differences; Transition, Job to Job; Wage Dynamics; Wage Gap; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

By age 30 white women are more likely to be employed, either full or part-time, and to earn more compared to Hispanic and black women. We trace these employment and wage inequalities to young women's early work experiences, in particular work-related transitions. Using the NLSY79 (Work History File) we examine two facets of women's labor market dynamics between ages 16-30, namely transitions between employment and nonemployment, and transitions among employers. Neither labor force instability or job turnover influence women's employment status at age 30, but both aspects of early market dynamism influence wages. We find that a moderate amount of job turnover during young adulthood is an essential component of the career shaping process which enhances women's economic mobility. However, excessive turnover, particularly among young adult women, is economically counterproductive. Young black women experience fewer transitions over the early life course, but our results indicate that they benefit more from both types of transitions compared to white and Hispanic women.
Bibliography Citation
Alon, Sigal and Marta Tienda. "Employment and Wage Consequences of Young Women's Labor Force and Job Transitions." Working Paper No. 2000-1, Office of Population Research, Princeton University, May 2000.
3. Alon, Sigal
Tienda, Marta
Occupational Careers of Young Women
Working Paper No. 2000-5, Office of Population Research, Princeton University, August 2000.
Also: http://opr.princeton.edu/papers/opr0005.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Office of Population Research, Princeton University
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; College Education; Education; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Labor Force Participation; Mobility, Occupational; Occupational Attainment; Transition, Job to Job; Women's Education; Work Attachment; Work Experience; Work Histories

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examines differences in timing and frequency of occupational changes by education level, existence of systematic occupational trajectories, and four modal career types based on amount of schooling acquired; since 1979; US. Based on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Occupational exchanges are a pervasive feature of the U.S. labor market as millions of persons change their occupation in any given year; the majority do so voluntarily, seeking better pay, job advancement, or improved working conditions. Yet It is unclear what share of these changes are chaotic and which represent leading to a systematic sequence of upward mobility. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (Work History file) we examine the occupational careers of young women and find striking differences in the timing and frequency of occupational changes according to levels of education, particularly between college graduates and those with less than high school education. "Career trees" for most frequent occupational paths reveal that systematic occupational trajectories do exist, although with varying degrees of orderliness. We discover four modal career types based on the amount of schooling acquired. We conclude that the complex nature of women's occupational careers is simplified by our focus on their educational attainment.
Bibliography Citation
Alon, Sigal and Marta Tienda. "Occupational Careers of Young Women." Working Paper No. 2000-5, Office of Population Research, Princeton University, August 2000.
4. Miller, Jane E.
Korenman, Sanders D.
Poverty, Nutritional Status, Growth and Cognitive Development of Children in the United States
Working Paper No. 93-5, Princeton NJ: Office of Population Research, Princeton University, 1993
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Office of Population Research, Princeton University
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birthweight; Child Development; Child Health; Childhood Education, Early; Children, Academic Development; Cognitive Ability; Cognitive Development; Health, Mental; Height; Height, Height-Weight Ratios; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Mothers, Height; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Poverty; Verbal Memory (McCarthy Scale); Weight; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper describes deficits in nutritional status, physical growth, and cognitive development among poor children in the United States. Data are taken from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, which has collected measures of family income each year from 1978 to 1990, and measures of height, weight, and cognitive development of children in 1986, 1988, and 1990. The results suggest that, first, there are substantial nutritional and developmental costs to children in chronically poor families; second, single-year income measures do not adequately capture the effects of chronic poverty on child nutritional status and cognitive development; and third, the adverse effects of chronic poverty are large even when we control for other characteristics associated with poverty such as low educational attainment of mothers, family structure, young maternal age, low academic ability of mother, minority racial identification, and when we control for weight and height of the mother and size of the infant at birth. Both long-term poverty and poor nutritional status are associated with impaired cognitive and socioemotional development in early childhood. Further research is needed before definitive, causal statements can be made. Nonetheless, we find evidence that, compared to children from higher-income families, poor children are at heightened risk of wasting, stunting and cognitive impairment, and experience reduced rates of physical growth in early childhood.
Bibliography Citation
Miller, Jane E. and Sanders D. Korenman. "Poverty, Nutritional Status, Growth and Cognitive Development of Children in the United States." Working Paper No. 93-5, Princeton NJ: Office of Population Research, Princeton University, 1993.
5. Schneider, Daniel J.
Wealth and the Marital Divide
Working Paper, Office of Population Research, Princeton University, March 22nd, 2010.
Also: http://www.princeton.edu/~djschnei/wealthdivide_032210.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Office of Population Research, Princeton University
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Assets; Educational Status; Gender Differences; Marriage; Racial Differences; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Marriage patterns differ dramatically in the United States by race and education. The author identifies a novel explanation for these marital divides; namely, the important role of personal wealth in marriage entry. Using event history models and data from the NLSY-79 cohort, the author shows that wealth is an important predictor of first marriage and that differences in asset ownership by race and education help to explain a significant portion of the race and education gaps in first marriage. The paper also tests possible explanations for why wealth plays an important role in first marriage entry and presents evidence that wealth is primarily important because of its symbolic value.

(Previously circulated and presented as "Norms and Nuptials: The Changing Social Price of Marriage.")
Presentations:
Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP), Annual Meeting. August 2009.
Population Association of America (PAA), Annual Meeting. April 2009.
Eastern Sociological Society (ESS), Annual Meeting. March 2009.
Princeton University, Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Workshop. September 2008.

Bibliography Citation
Schneider, Daniel J. "Wealth and the Marital Divide." Working Paper, Office of Population Research, Princeton University, March 22nd, 2010.