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Source: North Central Sociological Association
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Krause, Neal
Stryker, Sheldon
Economic Stress and Psycho-Physiological Well-Being
Presented: [S.L.], Meetings of the North Central Sociological Association, 1980
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: North Central Sociological Association ==> Routledge (new in 2012)
Keyword(s): Internal-External Attitude; Stress; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the 1969 and 1971 waves of the NLS of Older Men were analyzed to assess the effects of stressful economic life events (e.g., income loss, unemployment) on psycho-physiological well-being. The role of locus of control in mediating the effects of economic stress was also examined. A three-stage least squares analysis of the 2,698 responses confirms the hypothesis that internals handle economic stress in a more constructive or realistic way than externals. The data did show that economic stress exerted a strong negative effect on psycho- physiological well-being. The need for more research on coping strategies in stress situations was also discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Krause, Neal and Sheldon Stryker. "Economic Stress and Psycho-Physiological Well-Being." Presented: [S.L.], Meetings of the North Central Sociological Association, 1980.
2. Macke, Anne Statham
Changing Family Roles as Predictors of Labor Force Behaviors
Presented: Cincinnati, OH, Meetings of the North Central Sociological Association, May 1978
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: North Central Sociological Association ==> Routledge (new in 2012)
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Family Constraints; Family Influences; Mobility, Job

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the four age/sex groups in the NLS were analyzed to examine the impact of family role attitudes on labor force behaviors. Nontraditional men and traditional women, being relatively free of family support responsibility, were expected to exhibit more flexibility in their labor force behaviors. They were expected to change employers more frequently, to do so for personal gain or satisfaction, to feel less constrained by the family's economic needs. The findings partially support the hypothesis, but show the greatest similarity between nontraditional men and nontraditional women. These nontraditional persons change employers more often, do so for personal gain or satisfaction, but are actually more constrained by the family's support situation. This combination of flexibility and constraint represents joint support responsibility. By closely monitoring the family's situation, each partner can provide security to the other during risky transitions, in the end allowing for more flexibility and ultimate job success. Evidence of this pattern was found in all age and race groups, along with some evidence that the prevalence of this pattern is increasing over time.
Bibliography Citation
Macke, Anne Statham. "Changing Family Roles as Predictors of Labor Force Behaviors." Presented: Cincinnati, OH, Meetings of the North Central Sociological Association, May 1978.