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Source: New England Journal of Public Policy
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Donato, Katharine M.
Wojtkiewicz, Roger A.
Educational Achievement of U.S. Puerto Ricans
New England Journal of Public Policy 11,2 (Spring-Summer 1996): 99-111
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79
Publisher: John W. McCormack Institute of Public Affairs
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Ethnic Groups; Hispanics; Minority Groups; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Extends research on minority educational achievement to the 1990s, emphasizing the experiences of Puerto Ricans, using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Results suggest that compared with whites, blacks, & Mexicans, Puerto Ricans exhibit the lowest high school graduation rates. Their educational disadvantage is unique: even if they assumed the attributes of whites, they would graduate at lower rates. This finding deserves priority in the agendas of both scholars & policy specialists. 5 Tables. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Donato, Katharine M. and Roger A. Wojtkiewicz. "Educational Achievement of U.S. Puerto Ricans." New England Journal of Public Policy 11,2 (Spring-Summer 1996): 99-111.
2. Padilla, Yolanda Chavez
The Influence of Family Background on the Educational Attainment of Latinos
New England Journal of Public Policy 11,2 (Spring-Summer 1996): 25-48
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: John W. McCormack Institute of Public Affairs
Keyword(s): Cognitive Ability; Educational Attainment; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Ethnic Studies; Family Background; Family Income; Family Influences; Fathers, Influence; Hispanics; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examines the family background & late childhood factors influencing the educational attainment of 49 Latino males ages 14-17, drawing on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience - Youth Cohort, 1978-1988. Findings show that family background & resources, ie, father's income & education, number of siblings, educational resources in the home, & national origin, have a strong effect on the total years of schooling completed. However, social psychological attributes, cognitive ability, parental socialization, & time of immigration & generational status have a significant effect on education independent of social origins. Second-generation Latino men achieve greater educational success than immigrants, but third-generation Latino men show a marked lack of progress. Controlling for social origins & generation, it is demonstrated that Puerto Ricans acquire, on average, 1 full year less schooling than men of Mexican origin. Overall, the full model explain s 44% of the variance in the level of educational attainment of young Latino men. 8 Tables. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Padilla, Yolanda Chavez. "The Influence of Family Background on the Educational Attainment of Latinos ." New England Journal of Public Policy 11,2 (Spring-Summer 1996): 25-48.
3. Santiago, Anna M.
Padilla, Yolanda Chavez
Persistence of Poverty across Generations: A Comparison of Anglos, Blacks, and Latinos
New England Journal of Public Policy 11,1 (Spring-Summer 1995): 117-146
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: John W. McCormack Institute of Public Affairs
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Ethnic Differences; Ethnic Groups; Family Background; Gender Differences; Minority Groups; Poverty; Public Sector; Racial Differences; Racial Studies; Welfare; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Utilizing data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, examines the impact of children growing up in poverty on the probability of their remaining in poverty during young adulthood. Racial, ethnic, and gender differences in patterns of persistent poverty are examined and predictors of poverty status in young adulthood are identified. The results suggest that women, regardless of their race, ethnicity, or adolescent poverty status, and black men who grew up in poverty, are more likely to be poor as young adults than are Anglo men. Logistic regression analyses reveal that in addition to education and work experience, metropolitan unemployment rates were also significant predictors of poverty status for both men and women. Further, while growing up in a poor family for extended periods of time was associated with the increasing probability of being poor for minority men and Anglo women, other family background variables were insignificant predictors of adult pover ty status in all models. 6 Tables, 2 Appendixes. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Santiago, Anna M. and Yolanda Chavez Padilla. "Persistence of Poverty across Generations: A Comparison of Anglos, Blacks, and Latinos." New England Journal of Public Policy 11,1 (Spring-Summer 1995): 117-146.