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Source: national council on family relations
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Acs, Gregory P.
Can We Promote Child Well-Being by Promoting Marriage?
Journal of Marriage and Family 69,5 (December 2007): 1326-1344.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2007.00450.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Well-Being; Household Composition; Marital Stability; Marriage; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Temperament; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

This article uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort Mother-Child files to explore the idea that child well-being can be improved by encouraging and enhancing parental marriage. I consider how children's living arrangements, the stability of parental marriages, and changes in living arrangements are related to children's behavior and cognitive test scores. Although there is some evidence that children living with their married parents, even parents in unstable marriages, have better outcomes than children living in certain nonmarital arrangements, the findings vary across domains and specifications, and the effect sizes are generally small. Thus, any benefits of policies aimed improving child well-being by encouraging and enhancing parental marriage are likely to be modest at best.
Bibliography Citation
Acs, Gregory P. "Can We Promote Child Well-Being by Promoting Marriage? ." Journal of Marriage and Family 69,5 (December 2007): 1326-1344.
2. Jang, Bohyun
Snyder, Anastasia R.
The Role of Residential Mobility in the Transition to First Marriage
Presented: Orlando FL, National Council on Family Relations Annual Conference, November 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Marriage; Mobility, Residential

Using data from the NLSY79, this study examined the role of residential mobility in the transition to first marriage. The preliminary results found that individual and household characteristics are significantly related with the transition into first marriage; however, the unemployment rate in a local county does not significantly impact the odds of first marriage. Mobility factors are significantly related to the transition to first marriage; the total number of moves does not appear to have a huge influence on union formation; rather, the timing of move is more important to the transition to marriage.
Bibliography Citation
Jang, Bohyun and Anastasia R. Snyder. "The Role of Residential Mobility in the Transition to First Marriage." Presented: Orlando FL, National Council on Family Relations Annual Conference, November 2011.
3. Larzelere, Robert E.
Cox, Ronald B. Jr.
Danelia, Ketevan
Mandara, Jelani
Do Child Outcomes of All Disciplinary Enforcements Vary By Ethnicity?
Presented: Little Rock, AR, Annual Conference of the National Council on Family Relations, November 2008
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Discipline; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parents, Behavior; Punishment, Corporal

The association of spanking with externalizing behavior problems varies by ethnicity in many studies comparing Black and White Americans. This study investigates whether the outcomes of other disciplinary enforcements also varies by ethnicity in 7- to 11-year-olds. Ethnic interactions were found for spanking, privilege removal, grounding, and, marginally, for sending children to their room. The significant simple effects were never detrimental for Hispanics or Blacks and never beneficial for Whites. At these ages, privilege removal appeared effective except for Whites and grounding was effective for Hispanics. Spanking and sending children to their room showed opposite effects for Blacks and Whites. This study uses data from two waves (1996 & 1998) of the well-known National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The children were 7.5 to 11.4 years olds in 1996 and included 53% boys. The NLSY oversampled ethnic minorities, yielding 22% Hispanic-Americans (HAs), 27% African-Americans (AAs), and 51% European-Americans (EAs). The sample size was 868 for most analyses after dropping cases with missing data.
Bibliography Citation
Larzelere, Robert E., Ronald B. Jr. Cox, Ketevan Danelia and Jelani Mandara. "Do Child Outcomes of All Disciplinary Enforcements Vary By Ethnicity?." Presented: Little Rock, AR, Annual Conference of the National Council on Family Relations, November 2008.
4. Sandberg-Thoma, Sara
Kotila, Letitia
Life Events and Mental Health at the Transition to Parenthood
Presented: Phoenix AZ, National Council on Family Relations Annual Conference, October-November 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Health Factors; Health, Mental; Parenthood; Stress

The transition to parenthood is a normative, yet stressful life event, where some individuals appear more at-risk for declines in mental health. The accumulation of undesirable life events at this critical time period may explain the occurrence of mental health discrepancies.Using the NLSY97 dataset, we assess relations between life events and mental health at the transition to parenthood. Preliminary results indicate that undesirable life events experienced during the time of childbirth are associated with poor mental health; no association was found for desirable life events. Future analyses plan to address the nature of these associations. Practical implications are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Sandberg-Thoma, Sara and Letitia Kotila. "Life Events and Mental Health at the Transition to Parenthood." Presented: Phoenix AZ, National Council on Family Relations Annual Conference, October-November 2012.