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Source: Munich Personal RePEc Archive (MPRE)
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Barua, Rashmi
Intertemporal Substitution in Maternal Labor Supply: Evidence Using State School Entrance Age Laws
MPRA Paper No. 7923, Munich Personal RePEc Archive, 12 May 2008.
Also: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/7923/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Munich Personal RePEc Archive (MPRA)
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Endogeneity; Geocoded Data; Human Capital; Labor Market Outcomes; Maternal Employment; School Entry/Readiness; State-Level Data/Policy; Time Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

[First posted 25 March 2008.]
[Originally appeared as: Working Paper, Department of Economics, Boston University, November 2007].
In this paper, I propose a new framework to study the intertemporal labor supply hypothesis. I use an exogenous source of variation in maternal net earning opportunities, generated through school entrance age of children, to study intertemporal labor supply behavior. Employing data from the 1980 US Census and the NLSY, I estimate the effect of a one year delay in school attendance on long run maternal labor supply. To deal with the endogeneity of school attendance age, I exploit the variation in child month of birth and state kindergarten entrance age laws. IV estimates imply that having a 5 year old enrolled in school increases labor supply measures for married women, with no younger children, by between 7 to 34 percent. In contrast to the results for married mothers, I do not find any statistically significant effect on labor market outcomes for single mothers or mothers of 5 year olds with additional younger children. Further, using a sample of 7 to 10 year olds from the NLSY, I investigate persistence in employment outcomes for a married mother whose child delayed school entry. The estimates suggest that delayed school enrollment has long run implications for maternal labor supply. Results point towards significant intertemporal substitution in labor supply. Rough calculations yield an uncompensated wage elasticity of 0.76 and an intertemporal elasticity of substitution equal to 1.1.
Bibliography Citation
Barua, Rashmi. "Intertemporal Substitution in Maternal Labor Supply: Evidence Using State School Entrance Age Laws." MPRA Paper No. 7923, Munich Personal RePEc Archive, 12 May 2008.
2. Woock, Christopher
The Earnings Losses of Injured Men: Reported and Unreported Injuries
MPRA Paper No. 14688, Munich Personal RePEc Archive (MPRE), December 2007.
Also: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/14688/1/MPRA_paper_14688.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Munich Personal RePEc Archive (MPRA)
Keyword(s): Benefits; Disability; Disabled Workers; Earnings; Injuries; Worker's Compensation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using individual reports of workplace injuries, I estimate the effect of injuries on the labor market earnings of men. Injured workers suffer large and persistent annual earnings losses, an average of $2,200 per year following injury. Moreover, data restrictions on previous studies resulted in earnings losses 1.2 to 3 times larger than those found when all injured workers are compared to uninjured workers. Largest losses occur when a work limiting disability follows injury, with average losses from $4,000 to $8,000. The findings suggest a more nuanced picture than previously presented, and suggest focusing on injuries resulting in a disability
Bibliography Citation
Woock, Christopher. "The Earnings Losses of Injured Men: Reported and Unreported Injuries." MPRA Paper No. 14688, Munich Personal RePEc Archive (MPRE), December 2007.
3. Wu, Stephen
Shapiro, Joel D.
Fatalism and Savings
MPRA Paper No. 24852, Munich Personal RePEc Archive, July 2010.
Also: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/24852/1/MPRA_paper_24852.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Munich Personal RePEc Archive (MPRA)
Keyword(s): Pearlin Mastery Scale; Retirement; Risk Perception; Risk-Taking; Savings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

An individual's decision about how much to save depends on her perception of how current savings affects future well-being. Fatalistic individuals believe that they have little or no control over future outcomes. We develop a theoretical model linking fatalism to savings and test the predictions using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The model predicts that fatalism decreases savings for moderately risk averse individuals, but actually increases savings for highly risk averse individuals. Furthermore, fatalism decreases effort in learning about savings and investment options. The empirical results support the theoretical predictions of the model and are robust to the inclusion of a number of additional control variables.
Bibliography Citation
Wu, Stephen and Joel D. Shapiro. "Fatalism and Savings." MPRA Paper No. 24852, Munich Personal RePEc Archive, July 2010.