Search Results

Source: Marriage and Family Review
Resulting in 26 citations.
1. Averett, Susan L.
Gennetian, Lisa Anoush
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Patterns and Determinants of Paternal Child Care During a Child's First Three Years of Life
Marriage and Family Review 29,2-3 (2000): 115-136.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J002v29n02_08
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Child Care; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Involvement; Foster Care; Hispanics; Racial Differences; Work Hours

This study examined patterns and determinants of father care of young children while mothers are working. The authors use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), a nationally representative sample of individuals born from 1957 through 1964 who were interviewed as teenagers and reinterviewed every subsequent year. The final sample for this study included 1188 children and their 863 mothers. The results showed that full-time working mothers are less likely to use father care. Fathers in occupations that require non-day shifts are more likely to provide child care. While some studies have shown that fathers are more likely to provide care if they are unemployed, the data here show that fathers who provide care are no more likely to be unemployed than fathers who do not provide care. Of all the children in the sample whose mothers worked during their first year of life, 4.2% were cared for exclusively by their fathers and 4.4% were cared for by their fathers and some other care provider. Children who lived in states where the costs of child care are higher were more likely to be cared for exclusively by fathers. Hispanics were less likely to use only father care, and families in which the mother identified with traditional gender roles were less likely to use father only care. Families living in the South were less likely to use some father care. The determinants of father care varied with the extent of the care provides as well as with the age of the child. Working mothers who identified with traditional gender role patterns were less likely to use father care exclusively during the child's first year, but the effect becomes insignificant if the child had both father care and other types of care. Work schedules were generally important in predicting the use of father care with other care. While Hispanics were less likely to provide father care, those living in areas with high unemployment were more likely to provide care. Whites and African Americans living in areas of high unemployment were less likely to provide father care. These findings suggest that one way to increase father involvement is to support flexible work schedules for fathers.
Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L., Lisa Anoush Gennetian and H. Elizabeth Peters. "Patterns and Determinants of Paternal Child Care During a Child's First Three Years of Life." Marriage and Family Review 29,2-3 (2000): 115-136.
2. Averett, Susan L.
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Gennetian, Lisa Anoush
Patterns and Determinants of Paternal Child Care During a Child's First Three Years of Life
In: Fatherhood: Research, Interventions, and Policies, Volume 1. H. E. Peters and R. D. Day, eds. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press, Inc., 2000.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Child Care; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Presence; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness

Also co-published simultaneously in Marriage and Family Review 29, 2/3 and 4, 2000

Conference: Conference on Father Involvement (Oct 1996 : Bethesda, MD, US). This paper uses retrospective child care data from the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine the patterns and determinants of paternal child care during a child's 1st 3 yrs of life. Data were from 2-parent families and focused on 1,188 children of 863 mothers who worked sometime between the child's birth date and the child's 3rd birthday. It was found that father care is a fairly stable form of care; the average number of months that father care is used during a year is similar to the duration of other forms of child care. Paternal care is often used in conjunction with other types of child care including relative, nonrelative, and center care. Findings also show that different characteristics predict paternal child care according to the timing and extent of care. For those fathers who are the exclusive providers of child care during the 1st yr of life, the incidence of paternal child care is associated with race or ethnicity and a mother's identification with nontraditional gender roles. For those fathers who provide some of the total care during the 1st 3 yrs of a child's life, the incidence of paternal child care is more highly associated with the flexibility of a mother's and father's work schedule. ((c) 2000 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved). Note(s): An earlier version was presented at the Conference on Father Involvement and at the annual meetings of the Population Association of America, Mar, 1997.; Special Issue: Fatherhood: Research, interventions and policies. Part I.

Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L., H. Elizabeth Peters and Lisa Anoush Gennetian. "Patterns and Determinants of Paternal Child Care During a Child's First Three Years of Life" In: Fatherhood: Research, Interventions, and Policies, Volume 1. H. E. Peters and R. D. Day, eds. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press, Inc., 2000.
3. Bolkan, Cory
Sano, Yoshie
De Costa, Jennifer
Acock, Alan C.
Day, Randal D.
Early Adolescents' Perceptions of Mothers' and Fathers' Parenting Styles and Problem Behavior.
Marriage and Family Review 46,8 (2010): 563-579.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494929.2010.543040
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Behavior; Behavioral Problems; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Gender; Modeling, Structural Equation; Parenting Skills/Styles; Substance Use; Teenagers

We investigated early adolescents' perceptions of parenting styles in mother-father-adolescent triads along with child self-reported problem behaviors (substance abuse and delinquency). We also examined the various combinations of mothers' and fathers' parenting styles by child gender in relation to problem behavior. Participants included 3,353 children (aged 12 to 14) from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-97. Results from our structural equation model indicated that mothers and fathers may use different parenting strategies and that permissive parenting may not be as detrimental as previously assumed. In addition, youth perceptions of each parent were equally important in explaining problem behavior among both daughters and sons, but the perception of an authoritarian mother showed stronger adverse effects on sons, even after controlling for poverty and peer influence. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Bolkan, Cory, Yoshie Sano, Jennifer De Costa, Alan C. Acock and Randal D. Day. "Early Adolescents' Perceptions of Mothers' and Fathers' Parenting Styles and Problem Behavior." Marriage and Family Review 46,8 (2010): 563-579.
4. Caputo, Richard K.
Age-Condensed and Age-Gapped Families: Coresidency with Elderly Parents and Relatives in a Mature Women's Cohort, 1967-1995
Marriage and Family Review 29,1 (Spring 1999): 77-95.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J002v29n01_06
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Age at First Birth; Family Characteristics; Family Structure; Grandchildren; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Adolescent; Racial Differences; Residence; Women

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey, Mature Women's Cohort, this study found that not only is a sizable minority of mature women likely to reside with their aging parents and relatives in any given survey year, but that this trend increases over time. Unexpectedly, black women were found to be more likely than white women to reside in age-gapped families, signifying that they were more likely than white women to delay childbirth. Black women also were found to have greater frequencies and prevalence of residing in intergenerational families than white women. This pattern indicated, by extension, that intergenerational responsibilities might be a greater factor contributing to delayed childbirth for black women than was the case for white women. As expected, few aging parents or relatives were found in age-condensed families. The presence of grandchildren, rather than a respondent's own children, apparently accounted for this finding. This pattern suggested that, for maturing women who had been teenage mothers, the flow of intergenerational responsibilities proceeds more extensively in the direction of subsequent generations rather than toward previous generations.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Age-Condensed and Age-Gapped Families: Coresidency with Elderly Parents and Relatives in a Mature Women's Cohort, 1967-1995." Marriage and Family Review 29,1 (Spring 1999): 77-95.
5. Caputo, Richard K.
Inheritance and Intergenerational Transmission of Parental Care
Marriage and Family Review 37,1-2 (2005): 107-127.
Also: In: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J002v37n01_08
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Caregivers, Adult Children; Gender Differences; Inheritance; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission

SUMMARY. This paper examines the relative influence of inheritance-related and intergenerational factors on the likelihood of adult daughters providing personal care, doing household chores, or providing income to their aging parents. The study sample (n = 399) comprises a sub-sample of the National Longitudinal Surveys, Young Women's Cohort. Findings challenge the primacy of an "ethic of care" attributed to adult children in general and adult daughters in particular in regard to filial obligation to parents when it comes to providing personal care. They also in part support "ethic of care" theories when it comes to providing financial assistance. Findings suggest that targeted legislation with specific incentives may be more effective than bully pulpit or moral exhortations to ensure sufficient care by adult children for aging baby boomers in non-institutionalized settings for as long as possible to offset the costs of more formal care in years to come. [Article copies available for a fee from The Haworth Document Delivery Service: 1-800-HAWORTH. E-mail address: Website: © 2005 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.]

Published simultaneously In: Challenges of Aging on U.S. Families: Policy and Practice Implications, R.K. Caputo. The Haworth Press, Inc., 2005

Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Inheritance and Intergenerational Transmission of Parental Care." Marriage and Family Review 37,1-2 (2005): 107-127.
6. Caputo, Richard K.
Marital Status and Other Correlates of Personal Bankruptcy, 1986–2004
Marriage and Family Review 44,1 (Fall 2008): 5-32.
Also: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=g903677742
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Bankruptcy; Economic Well-Being; Marital Status

Relying on National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) data, this retrospective cohort study found that 11.6% (n¼882) of the eligible study sample (N¼7,609) declared personal or nonbusiness, nonentrepreneurial between 1986 and 2004. These debtors had average annual incomes that were about 2.5 times official poverty thresholds. Those who were divorced in 2004 were most likely to have declared bankruptcy (16.4%), followed by separated (13.9%), married with spouses present (11.2%), and never–married (7.0%) persons. Specific correlates of bankruptcy varied by year. Marital status was associated with likelihood of declaring bankruptcy in only 6 of 14 survey years: Never-married persons at the time of declared bankruptcy were less likely than married persons to declare, whereas formerly married persons, whether divorced or separated, were more likely than married persons to do so. Formerly married persons who declared bankruptcy bounced back economically to a lesser degree than did married persons, even though their predeclared bankruptcy levels of economic well-being were roughly equivalent. Interaction effects showed that formerly married women were more likely to declare bankruptcy than their male counterparts.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Marital Status and Other Correlates of Personal Bankruptcy, 1986–2004." Marriage and Family Review 44,1 (Fall 2008): 5-32.
7. Day, Randal D.
Gavazzi, Stephen M.
Miller, Richard
van Langeveld, Alisa
Compelling Family Processes
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 116-128.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902733260
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Family Formation; Family Studies

This article introduces the idea of family process research and asserts that the study of family processes is an indispensable component of any effort to conceptualize and measure family life. Within this article the family process approach is defined through the use of several domains that categorize core constructs. Further, several key assumptions are identified that form the foundation this family process approach. A related objective of this article advances the notion that family process--oriented research has grown increasingly sophisticated over the years, often in ways that have helped to shape and define the discipline of family science. This article instructs readers about using a family process approach, especially within the context of employing a large national data set such as the NLSY97.

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Haworth Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Day, Randal D., Stephen M. Gavazzi, Richard Miller and Alisa van Langeveld. "Compelling Family Processes." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 116-128.
8. Day, Randal D.
Jones-Sanpei, Hinckley A.
Price, Jessica L. Smith
Orthner, Dennis K.
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Kaye, Kelleen
Family Processes and Adolescent Religiosity and Religious Practice: View from the NLSY97
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 289-309.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902735109
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Parent-Child Interaction; Parental Marital Status; Religion; Religious Influences

This article focuses on family processes and adolescent religious attendance and personal religiosity. We find that the closeness and quality of the marital relationship and relationship between adolescent and parents significantly contributes to the strength of adolescent religious conviction and practice. The study used data from the NLSY97 cohort. Predictors include parenting style, closeness, and parent--child closeness; family structure; income, employment, parental education, mother's age at first birth, and number of siblings; adolescent characteristics (e.g., age, gender, race/ethnicity, disability, lying or cheating); and environmental characteristics (e.g., region of country, urbanicity, and physical environment risk). Family religious attendance was dramatically influenced by race in adolescents aged 16 years. Adolescents living with married, biological parents in 1997 were 36% more likely to attend worship services than those living with stepfamilies. Adolescents living in more physically risky environments, with peers who belonged to gangs, cut classes, or had sex, were less likely to attend weekly worship services with their families. Finally, compared with adolescents whose parents had a high-quality marital relationship and who had good relationships with both parents, all other adolescents were less likely to attend weekly worship services with their families.

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Haworth Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Day, Randal D., Hinckley A. Jones-Sanpei, Jessica L. Smith Price, Dennis K. Orthner, Elizabeth Catherine Hair, Kristin Anderson Moore and Kelleen Kaye. "Family Processes and Adolescent Religiosity and Religious Practice: View from the NLSY97." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 289-309.
9. Day, Randal D.
Kaye, Kelleen
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Exploring Family Processes in the NLSY97
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009):109-115.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902735364
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Family Process Measures; Family Studies

This article introduces a special edition of Marriage and Family Review. We comment on how this collection emerged and was funded. A theoretical foundation for the articles is also presented. Finally, a short description of each article is included. The overall conclusion of the article is that the NLSY97 is a significant and important starting point for researching inner family life and family process variables. However, the authors note that large-scale research projects are needed within which family processes are the focus and not a sidelight.

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Haworth Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Day, Randal D., Kelleen Kaye, Elizabeth Catherine Hair and Kristin Anderson Moore. "Exploring Family Processes in the NLSY97." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009):109-115.
10. Feigelman, William
Adopted Adults: Comparisons with Persons Raised in Conventional Families
Marriage and Family Review 25,3/4 (1997): 199-223.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J002v25n03_05
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adoption; Alcohol Use; Behavioral Problems; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Drug Use; Educational Attainment; Family Studies; Marital Stability

With archival data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth, this study compares the adult behavior patterns of adoptees (N = 101) and children raised in all other types of attenuated nuclear families (N = 3,949) with those raised till age 18 by both biological parents (N = 6,258). Both adoptees from intact two-parent families and those raised in all other types of disrupted nuclear families showed a higher incidence of problem behaviors during adolescence than children raised exclusively by both big-parents. This was in terms of the following dimensions: delinquency, youth crime, and the use of alcohol and drugs. Later, during adulthood, the educational attainments, job statuses, and levels of marital stability of those growing up in all types of disrupted nuclear families lagged behind those raised by both birth parents. At the time when most respondents were entering their thirties, those growing up in attenuated nuclear families were also more likely to report symptoms of depression. Adoptees, too, showed some, but much less clear evidence of long-term difficulties arising from their more turbulent adolescent experiences, compared to those growing up with both big-parents. By their late twenties and early thirties adoptees reported more instances of cohabitation prior to marriage and more females seemed to report lower levels of marital happiness. Yet, in most all other aspects surveyed-such as the recent use of drugs, educational attainments, job holding, employment successes, asset accumulations, home ownership and marital stability, they appeared much like those raised in intact big-parent families. Like their counterparts from all types of disrupted nuclear families, adoptees showed a need for greater social services-especially during adolescence--to overcome psycho-social problems emerging at that time. In the absence of having such care, long-term dysfunctional consequences are more likely to occur, especially for those raised in all other types of attenuated nuclear families. [Article copies available for a fee from The Haworth Document Delivery Service: 1-800-342-9678. E-mail address: getinfo@haworth.com]
Bibliography Citation
Feigelman, William. "Adopted Adults: Comparisons with Persons Raised in Conventional Families." Marriage and Family Review 25,3/4 (1997): 199-223.
11. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Anderson Moore, Kristin
Hadley, Alena M.
Kaye, Kelleen
Day, Randal D.
Orthner, Dennis K.
Parent Marital Quality and the Parent-Adolescent Relationship: Effects on Adolescent and Young Adult Health Outcomes
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 218-248.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902733500
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Children, Home Environment; Children, Mental Health; Children, Well-Being; Marital Disruption; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Religious Influences; Substance Use; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Although a number of studies examined the implications of marital disruption for adolescent well-being, few studied the implications of marital relationship quality on health outcomes for children in married-couple families. The present study examines how parent marital quality among intact families interacts with the quality of parent-adolescent relationships to predict physical health, mental health, and substance use in middle adolescence and early adulthood. The study uses data from the NLSY97 cohort, a nationally representative sample of adolescents who are being followed into adulthood. Predictors include the quality of the parent marital relationship, the quality of the parent-adolescent relationship, marital structure, and a number of contextual covariates and control variables. Combined parent marital quality and parent-adolescent relationship groups were developed using latent class analyses and were used to predict positive and negative health behaviors during the teen and early adult years. Results indicate that adolescents in families experiencing poor marital quality fared worse on physical health, mental health, and substance use outcomes. In addition, adolescents who reported poor relationships with at least one of their parents fared worse on outcomes. Adolescents whose parents have low-quality relationships and also have poor parent-adolescent relationships tended to fare least well across health measures. Adolescents whose parents have a high-quality relationship and who have a good parent-adolescent relationship with both parents consistently had the best outcomes. Overall, poor relationships consistently undermine mental health, physical health, and substance use. Family religious activities also consistently predict better health outcomes. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine, Kristin Anderson Moore, Alena M. Hadley, Kelleen Kaye, Randal D. Day and Dennis K. Orthner. "Parent Marital Quality and the Parent-Adolescent Relationship: Effects on Adolescent and Young Adult Health Outcomes." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 218-248.
12. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Hadley, Alena M.
Kaye, Kelleen
Day, Randal D.
Orthner, Dennis K.
Parent Marital Quality and the Parent-Adolescent Relationship: Profiles of Relationship Quality
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 189-217.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902733500
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Divorce; Fathers and Children; Marital Conflict; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Marital Status

Rigorous studies repeatedly have demonstrated the negative effects of parental divorce on outcomes for families. However, very few studies have examined the quality of the marital relationship within intact families or how the quality of the marital relationship interacts with the quality of the parent--adolescent relationship. The present study examines how aspects of parent marital quality, such as marital support and conflict between the couple, existed within married families and examines how patterns of mother--adolescent and father--adolescent relationships quality varied longitudinally from 1997 to 1999. The study uses data from the NLSY97 cohort, a nationally representative sample of adolescents who are being followed into adulthood. Four profiles of parent marital quality were developed using latent class analyses. Four growth profiles for the mother--adolescent relationship and for the father--adolescent relationship were created using latent growth class analysis in Mplus.

To examine how the parent marital quality profiles and the parent--adolescent relationship quality interact, we examined how they overlapped. Six distinct groups were evident from this examination: (1) high marital quality and good relationships with both parents, (2) high marital quality and a good relationship with only one parent, (3) high support and high conflict marital quality and a good relationship with at least one parent, (4) low marital quality and a good relationship with at least one parent, (5) high marital quality and bad relationships with both parents, and (6) low marital quality and bad relationships with both parents.

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Haworth Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine, Kristin Anderson Moore, Alena M. Hadley, Kelleen Kaye, Randal D. Day and Dennis K. Orthner. "Parent Marital Quality and the Parent-Adolescent Relationship: Profiles of Relationship Quality." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 189-217.
13. Hanson, Karla L.
Sobal, Jeffery
Vermeylen, Francoise M.
Social Selection and Social Causation in Marriage and Health: Longitudinal Evidence of Body Weight Change
Marriage and Family Review 50,5 (July 2014): 373-394.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01494929.2013.879555#.U-psBmPCpEN
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Marital History/Transitions; Marriage; Weight

Social selection proposes that health influences marriage, whereas social causation proposes that marriage influences health. We used biennial 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data to examine body weight 6 years before and 6 years after entering and exiting first marriages. For marital entry, social selection occurred as lighter women entered marriage. Social causation was not observed because all marital entry groups gained weight at comparable rates. Cohabitation was not associated with weight change after marital entry. For marital exit, short-term social causation occurred as men and women lost weight after marital exit and then regained equivalent weight. Overall, body weight change sometimes followed transitions into and out of marriage, but the associations were few in number, short-lived, and had no long-term impact on body weight.
Bibliography Citation
Hanson, Karla L., Jeffery Sobal and Francoise M. Vermeylen. "Social Selection and Social Causation in Marriage and Health: Longitudinal Evidence of Body Weight Change." Marriage and Family Review 50,5 (July 2014): 373-394.
14. Holmes, Erin K.
Jones-Sanpei, Hinckley A.
Day, Randal D.
Adolescent Outcome Measures in the NLSY97 Family Process Data Set: Variation by Race and Socioeconomic Conditions
Marriage and Family Review 45,4 (2009): 374-391.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902828151
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavioral Problems; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Family Process Measures; Gender Differences; Household Income; Racial Differences; Substance Use

This study uses nationally representative data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1997 to analyze adolescent outcome indexes (delinquency, substance use, and emotional and behavior problems) by gender, race, household income, and family structure. Results from analysis of variance show that family structure is correlated with better adolescent outcomes, even after controlling for gender, race, and household income. For example, adolescents from two-parent biological homes consistently reported significantly less delinquency and use of illegal substances such as alcohol, tobacco, or marijuana than adolescents from single-mother or stepfamily households. All adolescents and their parents in two-parent biological families reported significantly lower incidences of behavioral and emotional problems than adolescents and their parents in single-mother or stepfamilies. Other findings with respect to gender, race, and income, as well as some interaction effects, were also indicated by the analysis. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Holmes, Erin K., Hinckley A. Jones-Sanpei and Randal D. Day. "Adolescent Outcome Measures in the NLSY97 Family Process Data Set: Variation by Race and Socioeconomic Conditions." Marriage and Family Review 45,4 (2009): 374-391.
15. Jones-Sanpei, Hinckley A.
Day, Randal D.
Holmes, Erin K.
Core Family Process Measures in the NLSY97: Variation by Gender, Race, Income, and Family Structure
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 140-167.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902733468
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Family Process Measures; Family Studies; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Marital Status; Parenting Skills/Styles; Parents, Single

This article uses data from the NLSY97 to provide a descriptive portrait of core family process measures--family routines, parent-youth relationship, parental monitoring, control and autonomy in parenting adolescents, parenting style, and the parents' marital relationship. This research contributes to our understanding of how family processes vary by gender, race, household income, and family structure. The comparisons were performed using analysis of variance. We found that adolescents with single mothers reported fewer family routines; adolescents reported better relationships with their mothers than their fathers; and adolescents reported less control over limit setting than their parents reported but reported more limit breaking than their parents. Finally, most adolescents reported their parents had an authoritative parenting style. Other findings with respect to gender, race, and income, as well as some interaction effects, were also indicated by the analysis.

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Haworth Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Jones-Sanpei, Hinckley A., Randal D. Day and Erin K. Holmes. "Core Family Process Measures in the NLSY97: Variation by Gender, Race, Income, and Family Structure." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 140-167.
16. Jones-Sanpei, Hinckley A.
Day, Randal D.
Holmes, Erin K.
van Langeveld, Alisa
Family Process Variables in the NLSY97: A Primer
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 129-139.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902733393
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Family Income; Family Process Measures; Family Structure; Gender; Racial Differences; Sample Selection; Siblings

The current report addresses several issues regarding family process measures in the NLSY97. We draw particular attention to the numerous sampling strategies available, the strengths and weaknesses of each strategy, the nature of missingness among variables dependent on sampling strategy, and the issue of nonindependence associated with sibling respondents in some, but not all, families sampled. We also include a description of four key variables created to describe variations in the family process measures by gender, race, family income, and family structure.

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Haworth Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Jones-Sanpei, Hinckley A., Randal D. Day, Erin K. Holmes and Alisa van Langeveld. "Family Process Variables in the NLSY97: A Primer." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 129-139.
17. Jones-Sanpei, Hinckley A.
Holmes, Erin K.
Day, Randal D.
Family Process Environmental Measures in the NLSY97: Variation by Race and Socioeconomic Conditions
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 168–188.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902733484
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Family Environment; Racial Differences; Religious Influences; Risk-Taking

This article uses data from the NLSY97 to provide a descriptive portrait of family environmental indices—family/home risk, physical environment risk, enriching environments for youth, and family religious practices. The report includes a brief overview of the literature on risk, resilience, and protective factors as they relate to family processes, detailed information about the indices related to family/home risk, physical environment risk, enriching environments for youth, and family religious practices, as well as variations in each of these indices by adolescent gender, race, family income, and family structure. The comparisons were performed using analysis of variance to control for group differences. Results show that White adolescents reported fewer environmental risks and more protective factors than African American adolescents. Parents of African American adolescents reported higher religiosity than parents of Hispanic or White adolescents. Other findings with respect to gender, race, and income, as well as some interaction effects, were also indicated by the analysis.

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Haworth Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Jones-Sanpei, Hinckley A., Erin K. Holmes and Randal D. Day. "Family Process Environmental Measures in the NLSY97: Variation by Race and Socioeconomic Conditions." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 168–188. A.
18. Kaye, Kelleen
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Hadley, Alena M.
Day, Randal D.
Orthner, Dennis K.
Parent Marital Quality and the Parent–Adolescent Relationship: Effects on Sexual Activity among Adolescents and Youth
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 270-288.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902733641
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Marital Stability; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Marital Status; Religious Influences; Risk-Taking; Teenagers; Variables, Independent - Covariate

The link between growing up outside of an intact family and the likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behaviors as an adolescent has been explored extensively. However, fewer studies examined the likelihood of risky sexual behaviors among adolescents within intact families and what elements of those married-parent families seem to function as protective factors for adolescents. This study looks at relationships within married-parent families—that is, the parent marital relationship, the youth-parent relationship, and the interaction of the two—to identify potential sources of resilience for adolescents that influence their sexual activity. Overall, the youths' relationship with their parents matters more than the parents' relationship with each other, particularly for male youth and youth in stepparent families. Other covariates with notable influence on youths' risky sexual behaviors include parents' marital disruption and religious activity during the teen years. Analyses are based on data from the NLSY97 cohort.

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Haworth Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Kaye, Kelleen, Kristin Anderson Moore, Elizabeth Catherine Hair, Alena M. Hadley, Randal D. Day and Dennis K. Orthner. "Parent Marital Quality and the Parent–Adolescent Relationship: Effects on Sexual Activity among Adolescents and Youth ." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 270-288.
19. Lerman, Robert I.
Price, Joseph P.
Wilcox, W. Bradford
Family Structure and Economic Success across the Life Course
Marriage and Family Review 53,8 (2017): 744-758.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01494929.2017.1316810
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Family Income; Family Structure; Income Dynamics/Shocks; Life Course; Parents, Single

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the role that family structure plays in long-run economic outcomes across the life course. Using nearly 30 years of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we find that youths who grow up with both biological parents earn more income, work more hours each week, and are more likely to be married themselves as adults, compared to children raised in single-parent families. Many of these differences continue to be statistically significant even after we control for family income experienced as an adolescent. In addition, the implied size of the income transfer that children growing up with a single parent to equalize lifetime economic outcomes would need – about $42,000 – is markedly larger than the income transfers now available to families in the United States.
Bibliography Citation
Lerman, Robert I., Joseph P. Price and W. Bradford Wilcox. "Family Structure and Economic Success across the Life Course." Marriage and Family Review 53,8 (2017): 744-758.
20. Lerman, Robert I.
Sorensen, Elaine
Father Involvement with Their Nonmarital Children Patterns, Determinants, and Effects on Their Earnings
Marriage and Family Review 29,2-3 (2000): 137-158.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J002v29n02_09
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Coresidence; Earnings; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Involvement; Fertility; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parents, Single; Work Hours

Conference: Population Association of America Annual Meetings (Mar 1997). This paper examines two sets of questions relevant to policy initiatives related to increasing father involvement: (1) the patterns of involvement between fathers and children born outside of marriage, and (2) whether father involvement leads to increased earnings. The paper defines father involvement as a continuum ranging from no visitation, to frequent visitation, to co-residence with the child, and to co-residence along with marrying the mother. Data come from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and examines this involvement in specific years and over time. One key finding is that most fathers of nonmarital children in their late 20s and early 30s are highly involved with at least one of their nonmarital children. In addition, it was found that cohabiting relationships and frequent visitation are often unstable, sometimes changing toward lower involvement, while in other cases changing toward higher degrees of involvement. A positive relationship between increased involvement of fathers and their subsequent hours of work and earnings. ((c) 2000 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved. Note(s): Previous version presented at the Population Association of America Meetings and the NICHD Conference on Father Involvement, Oct, 1996.; Special Issue: Fatherhood: Research, interventions and policies. Part I.
Bibliography Citation
Lerman, Robert I. and Elaine Sorensen. "Father Involvement with Their Nonmarital Children Patterns, Determinants, and Effects on Their Earnings." Marriage and Family Review 29,2-3 (2000): 137-158.
21. Ono, Hiromi
Family Types, Direct Money Transfers from Parents, and School Enrollment among Youth
Marriage and Family Review 47,1 (January 2011): 45-72.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494929.2011.558467
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Education Indicators; Income; Parental Investments; Stepfamilies

Intrafamily resource transfers have not been studied extensively as a process that may help reduce the well-being disadvantage of stepchildren in parental remarriages relative to biological children in parental first marriages. The process is examined here by analyzing the link between direct parental money transfers and academic outcomes, as measured by enrollment. I develop and test two alternative hypotheses pertaining to a part of this link, which distinctly applies to children of remarried stepfamilies-the component not shared with children in intact families. An adaptive strategy hypothesis posits a well-being enhancing distinct component, operationalized as a positive interaction effect between measures of parental transfers X stepchildren in parental remarriages. A compromised use hypothesis posits a well-being compromising one, implying a negative interaction effect. Two sets of results from analyzing data on 18- to 21-year-olds over multiple years (Nyouth-age = 5,736, Nperson = 3,615) in the first five waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 support the adaptive strategy hypothesis: (1) the interaction effect (income received from parents X being a stepchild in a parental remarriage) has a positive sign, and (2) this interaction effect is consistently positive, whether the youth is at risk of attending high school or college, even when the direction of the shared component of the link, as measured by the main effect of income from parents, varies by the level of schooling. The results suggest the presence of a robust well-being enhancing money transfer mechanism supporting children in some remarried stepparent families. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Ono, Hiromi. "Family Types, Direct Money Transfers from Parents, and School Enrollment among Youth." Marriage and Family Review 47,1 (January 2011): 45-72.
22. Orthner, Dennis K.
Jones-Sanpei, Hinckley A.
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Day, Randal D.
Kaye, Kelleen
Marital and Parental Relationship Quality and Educational Outcomes for Youth
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 249-269.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902733617
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; High School Completion/Graduates; High School Dropouts; Human Capital; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Marriage; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenthood

This research examines the effects of parental marital quality and the quality of the parent--child relationship on the educational progress of adolescents. Previous research indicates that family structure and economic capacity have significant effects on educational achievement and high school graduation rates. Few studies, however, examined the effects of the quality of the parental relationship on the educational outcomes of their children. This study is built on bioecological and social capital theories of human development suggesting that the capacity for child and youth development is enhanced when their primary relationships are supportive and provide them with social assets that encourage human capital development. The study uses data from the NLSY97, a nationally representative sample of adolescents who are being followed into adulthood.

The findings indicate that family stability and living with two biological parents is a stronger predictor of high school graduation than parent marital quality and the quality of the parent--child relationship. But the data also indicate that parent marital quality and the quality of the parent--child relationship have a strong and positive effect on postsecondary education access among those who do graduate from high school. These findings are interpreted in light of the contribution of relationship quality to further educational involvement and the implications this has for workforce development and successful labor force competition in a global economy.

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Haworth Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abst ract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Orthner, Dennis K., Hinckley A. Jones-Sanpei, Elizabeth Catherine Hair, Kristin Anderson Moore, Randal D. Day and Kelleen Kaye. "Marital and Parental Relationship Quality and Educational Outcomes for Youth." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 249-269.
23. Peters, H. Elizabeth
Day, Randal D.
Fatherhood: Research, Interventions and Policies
New York, NY: Haworth Press, 2000
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Child Care; Divorce; Ethnic Studies; Family Studies; Fatherhood; Fathers and Children; Fathers and Sons; Fathers, Influence; Fathers, Involvement; Gender Differences; Marital Status; Parents, Single

Co-published simultaneously as Marriage & Family Review 29,2/3 & 4 (2000).

Bringing together papers presented at the Conference on Father Involvement, this volume includes contributions by leading scholars in anthropology, demography, economics, family science, psychology, and sociology. Many of the contributors also address the implications of father involvement for family policy issues, including family leave, child care, and child support. Furthermore, the discussion of fatherhood ranges well beyond the case of intact, middle-class, white families to include fathers from various ethnic groups and socioeconomic classes and of varied marital status, including fathers of nonmarital children, single-father families, and nonresident fathers. Co-published simultaneously as Marriage & Family Review 29,2/3 & 4 (2000). Contents: I. The History of Fatherhood Research and Perspectives on Father Involvement. II. Fathers in Intact Families. III. Single Fathers and Fathers with Nonmarital Children. IV. Marital Disruption and Parent-Child Relationships: Interventions and Policies on Fatherhood. V. General Editors' Epilogue: The Diversity of Fatherhood: Change, Constancy, and Contradiction. REVIEW: How much power does a father have to influence his children's development? A lively and often heated public debate on the role and value of the father in a family has been underway in the US for the past decade. Nevertheless, we are far from understanding the complex ways in which fathers make contributions to their families and children. This book addresses the central questions of the role of fathers: What is the impact of father involvement on child outcomes? What factors predict increased involvement of fathers? It addresses both practical and theoretical concerns including the redefinition of fatherhood, changes over time in research on fatherhood, the predictive power of fathers' activities on their children's adult outcomes, the correlation between fathers' income and their involvement with their nonmarital children, the influence of fathers o n their sons' probability of growing up to become responsible fathers, the effects of divorce on father-son and father-daughter relationshps, and interventions that help to keep divorced fathers in touch with their children. This comprehensive, powerful book combines pioneering empirical research with thoughtful considerations of the social and psychological implications of fatherhood. It is essential reading for researchers, policymakers, psychologists, and students of family studies, human development, gender studies, social policy, sociology and human ecology

Bibliography Citation
Peters, H. Elizabeth and Randal D. Day. Fatherhood: Research, Interventions and Policies. New York, NY: Haworth Press, 2000.
24. Price, Jessica L. Smith
Day, Randal D.
Yorgason, Jeremy B.
A Longitudinal Examination of Family Processes, Demographic Variables, and Adolescent Weight
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 310-330.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wmfr20/45/2-3
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Demography; Ethnic Differences; Obesity; Parenting Skills/Styles; Racial Differences; Weight

Nationally representative studies estimate that almost one in five adolescents in the United States is overweight. This is a major concern for individuals' physical and psychological health and the overall economy in terms of health care costs and loss of productivity. A 12-to 14-year-old subsample of 4,688 adolescents from the NLSY97 cohort was used to address the association between family processes, demographic variables, and adolescent body mass index (BMI) percentile over 4 years. The final model indicated that frequency of family meals, gender, race, control, and mothers' BMI were important predictors of adolescent BMI percentile over time. Mothers' BMI was the strongest predictor of adolescent BMI percentile. More frequent family meals led to decreases in BMI percentile over time, whereas males, African Americans, and Latinos had higher average BMI percentiles than other groups.

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Haworth Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Price, Jessica L. Smith, Randal D. Day and Jeremy B. Yorgason. "A Longitudinal Examination of Family Processes, Demographic Variables, and Adolescent Weight." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 310-330.
25. Shafer, Kevin M.
Disentangling the Relationship Between Age and Marital History in Age-Assortative Mating
Marriage and Family Review 49,1 (2013): 83-114.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494929.2012.728557
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Dating; Divorce; Remarriage

Many scholars have noted that divorcees have age-assortative mating patterns distinct from the never-married. Similarly, comparisons between older and younger individuals indicate that hypergamy becomes increasingly likely with age. Unfortunately, prior research has not been able to disentangle the effects of age from the effect of divorce. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort (n = 12,231 for first marriage and 4,298 for remarriage) and heterogeneous choice models, this research predicted the likelihood of age homogamy and hypergamy as a function of age, marital history, and other factors. The results indicate that homogamy is largely an age-driven phenomena, where the never-married and previously married have similar patterns. However, the likelihood of hypergamy is higher for the previously married, even after accounting for the influence of age in the models.
Bibliography Citation
Shafer, Kevin M. "Disentangling the Relationship Between Age and Marital History in Age-Assortative Mating." Marriage and Family Review 49,1 (2013): 83-114.
26. Thompson, Stacy D.
Osteen, Sissy R.
Youngker, Leslie G.
Who Fares Better? Postnatal Adjustment of Adolescent Fathers and Mothers
Marriage and Family Review 33,4 (2001): 31-47.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J002v33n04_04
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Education; Fathers; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Mothers, Adolescent; Self-Esteem

This research used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) to examine the factors that contribute to later self-esteem and locus of control for adolescent mothers and adolescent fathers. The sample consisted of 421 adolescents (94 males and 327 females) who gave birth before or during 1979. Few differences were found between adolescent mothers' and adolescent fathers' scores. Findings indicated that adolescent fathers were adjusting slightly better than adolescent mothers, though both have low self-esteem. Mothers had significantly lower (more external) locus of control scores than fathers did in 1979. Predictors of adolescents' adjustment differed between the mothers and the fathers. For adolescent fathers, mothers' education was a significant predictor of self-esteem, while for adolescent mothers, subsequent pregnancies and adolescents' own education were significant predictors.
Bibliography Citation
Thompson, Stacy D., Sissy R. Osteen and Leslie G. Youngker. "Who Fares Better? Postnatal Adjustment of Adolescent Fathers and Mothers." Marriage and Family Review 33,4 (2001): 31-47.