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Source: Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. Artz, Benjamin
The Role of Firm Size and Performance Pay in Determining Employee Job Satisfaction Brief: Firm Size, Performance Pay, and Job Satisfaction
Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 22,2 (June 2008): 315–343.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9914.2007.00398.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Endogeneity; Job Satisfaction; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Performance pay; Unions; Wage Determination

Job satisfaction reflects the on-the-job utility of workers and has been found to influence both the behavior of workers and the productivity of firms. Performance pay remains popular and widely used to increase worker productivity and more generally align the objectives of workers and firms. Yet, its impact on job satisfaction is ambiguous. Whereas the increased earnings increase job satisfaction, the increased effort and risk decreases job satisfaction. This paper finds empirical evidence that on net performance pay increases job satisfaction but does so largely among union workers and males in larger firms. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Artz, Benjamin. "The Role of Firm Size and Performance Pay in Determining Employee Job Satisfaction Brief: Firm Size, Performance Pay, and Job Satisfaction." Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 22,2 (June 2008): 315–343. A.
2. Brown, Christian
Maternal Incarceration and Children's Education and Labor Market Outcomes
Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 31,1 (March 2017): 43-58.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/labr.12086/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Dropouts; Educational Attainment; Grade Retention/Repeat Grade; Labor Market Outcomes; Mothers, Incarceration; Parental Influences

I estimate the effect of maternal incarceration on education and labor market outcomes. I link mother-child panels and estimate maternal fixed effects to control for unobservable household heterogeneity. Maternal incarceration from birth to age 10 is associated with increased grade retention and dropout rates. Conditional on completing high school, incarceration from 15 to 17 is associated with decreased college attendance. Maternal incarceration does not appear to have a further effect on employment, but some wage penalties are apparent. Propensity score analysis suggests that controlling for unobservable household characteristics is vital when examining the link between incarceration and labor outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Brown, Christian. "Maternal Incarceration and Children's Education and Labor Market Outcomes." Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 31,1 (March 2017): 43-58.
3. Francesconi, Marco
Labour Force Transitions among Married Women in the USA
Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 13,4 (December 1999): 775-796.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-9914.00115/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Absenteeism; Demography; Economics of Gender; Employment, Part-Time; Family Structure; Human Capital Theory; Life Cycle Research; Marital Dissolution; Marriage; Occupational Choice; Training, Occupational; Training, On-the-Job; Work Hours

This paper describes the patterns of labour market transitions for a cohort of married women in the USA drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey and observed between 1968 and 1991. The empirical analysis of labour market movements is motivated by human capital theory augmented by demographic and life-cycle considerations. These movements are investigated by estimating competing risk models of labour force spell duration. The results show that the determinants of spell lengths and the determinants of the reasons for spell terminations vary across labour market states. More importantly, both the labour market state in which an individual is observed over her work cycle and the labour market state to which she moves are relevant in shaping her spell length and her tradable characteristics in the labour market.
Bibliography Citation
Francesconi, Marco. "Labour Force Transitions among Married Women in the USA." Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 13,4 (December 1999): 775-796.
4. Girtz, Robert
The Effects of Personality Traits on Wages: A Matching Approach
Labour: Review of Labor Economics and Industrial Relations 26,4 (December 2012): 455-471.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9914.2012.00556.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Propensity Scores; Self-Esteem; Wages

I use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 to estimate the effects of adolescent measurements of self-esteem and locus of control on adult wages using propensity score matching. An adolescent possessing high self-esteem will experience between 8.5 and 9.2 per cent higher wages as an adult. This result is statistically significant and robust to the addition of cognitive skill and family background characteristics. When cognitive skill and family background characteristics are controlled for, locus of control as an adolescent is insignificant in explaining adult wages. This result is contrary to findings in the literature.
Bibliography Citation
Girtz, Robert. "The Effects of Personality Traits on Wages: A Matching Approach." Labour: Review of Labor Economics and Industrial Relations 26,4 (December 2012): 455-471.
5. Gong, Tao
Do Parental Transfers Reduce Youths' Incentives to Work?
Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 23,4 (December 2009): 653-676.
Also: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1505068
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Allowance, Pocket Money; Labor Supply; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Parental Influences

This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to examine the effects that parental transfers from a family have on a youth's labor supply. The results from a fixed-effects two-stage least squares estimator suggest that: (i) parental pocket money reduces youths' incentives to work; (ii) parental allowances have a non-linear effect on hours worked; (iii) the subsample of siblings shows similar patterns that parental transfers have a negative impact on hours worked, although the magnitudes are slightly weaker than the full sample; and (iv) the response to parental transfers varies by age. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Gong, Tao. "Do Parental Transfers Reduce Youths' Incentives to Work?" Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 23,4 (December 2009): 653-676.
6. Liu, Haiyong
A Migration Study of Mother's Work, Welfare Participation, and Child Development
Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 22,1 (March 2008): 23-71.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9914.2007.00403.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: CEIS and Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Endogeneity; Labor Supply; Maternal Employment; Migration; Mothers and Daughters; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; Simultaneity; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates how women's migration and labor supply behaviors respond to changes in welfare policies and labor market conditions, controlling for endogenous initial residence and unobserved heterogeneity. It also traces out how these responses influence educational inputs and child outcomes. The simulation results show that poor and low-educated single women with children do change their residential locations in response to changes in welfare policies and labor market conditions. The magnitude of this response in the form of migration is rather modest. More importantly, however, such policy changes often have large and important impacts on particular at-risk groups.
Bibliography Citation
Liu, Haiyong. "A Migration Study of Mother's Work, Welfare Participation, and Child Development." Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 22,1 (March 2008): 23-71.
7. Moro, Andrea
Tello-Trillo, Sebastian
Tempesti, Tommaso
The Impact of Obesity on Wages: The Role of Personal Interactions and Job Selection
Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations published online (20 February 2019): DOI: 10.1111/labr.12145.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/labr.12145
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Obesity; Occupational Information Network (O*NET); Racial Differences; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

We estimate the effects of obesity on wages accounting for the endogenous selection of workers into jobs requiring different levels of personal interactions in the workplace. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 combined with detailed information about occupation characteristics from O*Net, we confirm the results from the literature finding a wage penalty for obese White women. This penalty is higher in jobs that require a high level of personal interactions. Accounting for job selection does not significantly change the estimated wage penalty.
Bibliography Citation
Moro, Andrea, Sebastian Tello-Trillo and Tommaso Tempesti. "The Impact of Obesity on Wages: The Role of Personal Interactions and Job Selection." Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations published online (20 February 2019): DOI: 10.1111/labr.12145.
8. O'Halloran, Patrick L.
Gender Differences in Formal On-The-Job Training: Incidence, Duration, and Intensity
Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 22,4 (December 2008): 629-659.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9914.2008.00427.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Discrimination, Sex; Gender Differences; Training, On-the-Job

This paper explores whether there is a gender gap in the incidence, duration, intensity, and number of events of on-the-job training. Overall, women appear to receive a higher incidence of on-the-job training whereas men receive on-the-job training of longer duration. Including measures intended to capture the extent of labor force attachment and expected tenure fails to reduce the gender gap in the duration of on-the-job training. Therefore, the gender gap in the duration of on-the-job training must be attributed to differences in unobserved worker characteristics that differ by gender or discrimination.
Bibliography Citation
O'Halloran, Patrick L. "Gender Differences in Formal On-The-Job Training: Incidence, Duration, and Intensity." Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 22,4 (December 2008): 629-659.
9. Stevans, Lonnie K.
Immigration and Occupational Crowding in the United States
Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 10,2 (Summer 1996): 357-374.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9914.1996.tb00089.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Human Capital; Immigrants; Mobility; Mobility, Occupational; Occupational Choice; Occupations; Racial Differences; Skilled Workers; Skills; Training, On-the-Job; Wage Effects

The 1990 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth is utilized to explore the effects that the occupational crowding of immigrants has on the real wage of indigenous and non-U.S. citizen workers already in the United States. Findings include adverse wage effects as a result of the crowding of immigrants on the following worker categories: (1) indigenous, unskilled, white or black workers and (2) non-U.S. citizen, skilled or unskilled black workers. Foreign-born, skilled, and white workers already in the U.S. realize a positive effect on their real wages as a result of having a large relative number of non-U.S. citizens in their occupations.
Bibliography Citation
Stevans, Lonnie K. "Immigration and Occupational Crowding in the United States." Labour: Review of Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 10,2 (Summer 1996): 357-374.