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Source: Juvenile and Family Court Journal
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Lee, Bora
Gerber, Jurg
Cochran, Joseph
Parenting Styles and Children's Delinquency Reconsidered: An Empirical Assessment
Juvenile Family Court Journal published online (11 June 2020): DOI: 10.1111/jfcj.12164.
Also: https://doi.org/10.1111/jfcj.12164
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Delinquency/Gang Activity; Gender Differences; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenting Skills/Styles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

For decades, criminological theories have emphasized the importance of strong parent‐child relationships in preventing children's delinquent behaviors (e.g., Gottfredson & Hirschi, 1990). In particular, Thornberry’s (1996) interactional theory has catalyzed studies of the critical importance of reciprocal relationships between parents and children. However, though previous studies have examined reciprocal relationships, they typically do not assess changes in those relationships over time (Wiloughby & Hamza, 2011). The purpose of this study is to evaluate how reciprocal relationships vary among parenting styles and how this variance accounts for children's delinquency. In particular, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 Cohort study, the present study examines how the authoritative parenting style and different parent's and child's sexes affect the reciprocal parent‐child relationship. It discovers a significant correlation between authoritative parenting styles and a reduction in child delinquency and observes how a parent's sex influences this dynamic.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Bora, Jurg Gerber and Joseph Cochran. "Parenting Styles and Children's Delinquency Reconsidered: An Empirical Assessment." Juvenile Family Court Journal published online (11 June 2020): DOI: 10.1111/jfcj.12164.
2. Tapia, Michael
Alarid, Leanne Fiftal
Clare, Courtney
Parenting Styles and Juvenile Delinquency: Exploring Gendered Relationships
Juvenile and Family Court Journal 69,2 (June 2018): 21-36.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jfcj.12110
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Delinquency/Gang Activity; Gender Differences; Parenting Skills/Styles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use the NLSY97 dataset to examine the parenting‐delinquency relationship and how it is conditioned by parents' gender, controlling for youths' gender. Generally, neglectful and authoritarian parenting styles were associated with the highest levels of delinquency in youths. When the sample was split by parent gender, authoritarianism held up across both groups, but permissive and neglectful parenting was only significant for fathers. Independent of parenting style, boys have higher delinquency levels than girls. The strength and magnitude of this relationship is nearly identical in separate equations for mothers and fathers. Parental attachment was not a significant protective factor against delinquency for either mothers or fathers.
Bibliography Citation
Tapia, Michael, Leanne Fiftal Alarid and Courtney Clare. "Parenting Styles and Juvenile Delinquency: Exploring Gendered Relationships." Juvenile and Family Court Journal 69,2 (June 2018): 21-36.
3. Taylor, Melanie
Juvenile Transfers to Adult Court: An Examination of the Long-Term Outcomes of Transferred and Non-Transferred Juveniles
Juvenile and Family Court Journal 66,4 (Fall 2015): 29-47.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jfcj.12050
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Criminal Justice System; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Earnings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Juveniles who are transferred to adult court are more likely to recidivate than non-transferred juveniles, but limited research has examined how transfer can impact other life outcomes like attending college and employment. To examine this issue, data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997) were analyzed from 1998 to 2011. It was found that court involvement during adolescence does not harm educational attainment. However, prosecution of juveniles in adult court significantly impairs earning potential well into adulthood. The current study provides further evidence of the long-term harms caused by transfer and demonstrates how transfer further disrupts the desistance process.
Bibliography Citation
Taylor, Melanie. "Juvenile Transfers to Adult Court: An Examination of the Long-Term Outcomes of Transferred and Non-Transferred Juveniles." Juvenile and Family Court Journal 66,4 (Fall 2015): 29-47.