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Source: Journal of Vocational Behavior
Resulting in 10 citations.
1. Andrisani, Paul J.
Miljus, Robert C.
Multivariate Analysis of Individual Differences in Preferences for Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Aspects of Work among National Samples of Young and Middle-Aged Women
Journal of Vocational Behavior 11,1 (August 1977): 14-30.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0001879177900148
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Blue-Collar Jobs; Intrinsic/Extrinsic Rewards; Job Rewards; Job Satisfaction; Rural/Urban Migration; White Collar Jobs

The authors examine, in a multivariate analysis, individual differences in preferences for intrinsic versus extrinsic aspects of work. Preferences are found to be significantly related to age, occupation, class of worker status, job satisfaction, educational attainment, and race. There was little evidence of preference difference between white-collar and blue- collar workers, between rural and urban workers, or among individuals with different levels of income.
Bibliography Citation
Andrisani, Paul J. and Robert C. Miljus. "Multivariate Analysis of Individual Differences in Preferences for Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Aspects of Work among National Samples of Young and Middle-Aged Women." Journal of Vocational Behavior 11,1 (August 1977): 14-30.
2. Becker, Brian E.
Krzystofiak, Frank J.
The Influence of Labor Market Discrimination on Locus of Control
Journal of Vocational Behavior 21,1 (August 1982): 60-70.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0001879182900537
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Job; Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Schooling; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Work History

Prior research has established the existence of racial differences in locus of control as well as a relationship between labor market experience and locus of control. This study extends this line of inquiry by examining the relationship between labor market discrimination and subsequent change in locus of control. Drawing on a national probability sample (N = 2857) of young men, multiple regression analysis was used to estimate the effect of labor market discrimination (over a 2-year period) on subsequent locus of control. The results indicate that perceptions of employment discrimination influence the level of externality among blacks, over and above racial identification. Blacks who view themselves as victims of employment discrimination experience twice the increase in externality as blacks reporting no awareness of discrimination.
Bibliography Citation
Becker, Brian E. and Frank J. Krzystofiak. "The Influence of Labor Market Discrimination on Locus of Control." Journal of Vocational Behavior 21,1 (August 1982): 60-70.
3. Converse, Patrick D.
Pathak, Jaya
DePaul-Haddock, Anne Marie
Gotlib, Tomer
Merbedone, Matthew
Controlling Your Environment and Yourself: Implications for Career Success
Journal of Vocational Behavior 80,1 (February 2012): 148-159.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001879111000996
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Career Patterns; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Job Satisfaction; Occupational Information Network (O*NET); Occupational Prestige; Self-Regulation/Self-Control

Given the complex and rapidly changing nature of the current work environment, individuals' capabilities to effectively influence their environment and regulate their behavior may be critical to career success. Drawing from the model of emergent interactive agency (Bandura, 1989), the current research examines this perspective, focusing on proactive personality and self-control as predictors of extrinsic and intrinsic career success. Although some studies have investigated proactive personality as a predictor of success, less research has focused on factors involved in this relationship and very little work has examined self-control in the context of career success. Study 1 involved a cross-sectional design with 249 full-time employees who completed measures assessing personality and career-related variables. Study 2 involved a longitudinal design with 1568 individuals who were rated on self-control during childhood and completed career-related measures approximately 20 years later. Study 1 results indicated proactive personality and self-control related to extrinsic career success (salary and occupational prestige) through educational attainment. Study 2 results indicated self-control related to extrinsic career success (salary and occupational prestige) through educational attainment and intrinsic career success (career satisfaction) through occupational opportunity for achievement. These findings contribute to the knowledge base regarding career success by highlighting the relevance of active control tendencies that are externally focused (proactive personality) as well as those that are internally focused (self-control) and identifying key factors linking these traits to career success.
Bibliography Citation
Converse, Patrick D., Jaya Pathak, Anne Marie DePaul-Haddock, Tomer Gotlib and Matthew Merbedone. "Controlling Your Environment and Yourself: Implications for Career Success." Journal of Vocational Behavior 80,1 (February 2012): 148-159.
4. Gottfredson, Linda S.
Becker, Henry J.
A Challenge to Vocational Psychology: How Important are Aspirations in Determining Male Career Development?
Journal of Vocational Behavior 18,2 (April 1981): 121-137.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0001879181900014
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Occupational Aspirations; Work History

This study assesses the relative importance of previous aspirations and previous jobs in determining later jobs held. The results supported the hypotheses that: (1) men more often achieve congruence between their aspiration and their field of employment by changing aspirations to match the job rather than vice versa; and (2) aspirations for field of work generally are not as useful as actual job field for predicting the field of jobs held 1 to 5 years later. In addition, middle-class young men were no more able to attain their aspirations either for field of employment or for status level of occupation than were lower-class male youths.
Bibliography Citation
Gottfredson, Linda S. and Henry J. Becker. "A Challenge to Vocational Psychology: How Important are Aspirations in Determining Male Career Development?" Journal of Vocational Behavior 18,2 (April 1981): 121-137.
5. Gottfredson, Linda S.
Brown, Vicky C.
Occupational Differentiation among White Men in the First Decade after High School
Journal of Vocational Behavior 19,3 (December 1981): 251-289.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0001879181900634
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Family Influences; I.Q.; Mobility, Job; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Results from an examination of the rate at which occupational differentiation proceeds among young white men (16- 28) suggest that the rate of labor force participation stabilizes in the early twenties, differentiation among men by education and the distribution of men among different broad levels and fields of work stabilizes by the mid twenties, and the sorting of men with different socioeconomic backgrounds into different occupational groups continues through the late twenties at which age it appears to have been largely completed. Although socioeconomic background helps to differentiate men in various fields and levels of work, academic achievement is the major dimension by which men are sorted.
Bibliography Citation
Gottfredson, Linda S. and Vicky C. Brown. "Occupational Differentiation among White Men in the First Decade after High School." Journal of Vocational Behavior 19,3 (December 1981): 251-289.
6. Huang, David Y.C.
Evans, Elizabeth
Hara, Motoaki
Weiss, Robert E.
Hser, Yih-Ing
Employment Trajectories: Exploring Gender Differences and Impacts of Drug Use
Journal of Vocational Behavior 79,1 (August 2011): 277-289.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001879110002022
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Drug Use; Employment; Gender Differences; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Substance Use

This study investigated the impact of drug use on employment over 20 years among men and women, utilizing data on 7661 participants in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Growth mixture modeling was applied, and five distinct employment trajectory groups were identified for both men and women. The identified patterns were largely similar for men and women except that a U-shape employment trajectory was uniquely identified for women. Early-initiation drug users, users of "hard" drugs, and frequent drug users were more likely to demonstrate consistently low levels of employment, and the negative relationship between drug use and employment was more apparent among men than women. Also, positive associations between employment and marriage became more salient for men over time, as did negative associations between employment and childrearing among women. Processes are dynamic and complex, suggesting that throughout the life course, protective factors that reduce the risk of employment problems emerge and change, as do critical periods for maximizing the impact of drug prevention and intervention efforts. [Copyright © Elsevier]

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Bibliography Citation
Huang, David Y.C., Elizabeth Evans, Motoaki Hara, Robert E. Weiss and Yih-Ing Hser. "Employment Trajectories: Exploring Gender Differences and Impacts of Drug Use." Journal of Vocational Behavior 79,1 (August 2011): 277-289.
7. Kohen, Andrew I.
Breinich, Susan C.
Knowledge of the World of Work: A Test of Occupational Information of Young Men
Journal of Vocational Behavior 6,1 (February 1975): 133-144.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0001879175900287
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Earnings; Occupational Choice; Occupational Status; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Vocational Guidance; Work Knowledge; World of Work Test

The study evaluates a test of occupational information administered to a national sample of 5,000 young men, aged 14 to 24 in 1966, as part of the NLS Young Men's cohort. The predictive validity of the test score is assessed by reference to multiple regression analyses which confirm the significance of the score as an independent predictor of subsequent hourly earnings and occupational status. Correlation and factor analyses are used to examine the quality of the measurement instrument. All in all, the instrument is judged to exhibit desirable characteristics in terms of internal consistency, reliability, discriminatory power, and level of difficulty. The test's reliability compares favorably with a commercially produced test designed to be used in counseling as a measure of occupational knowledge. With the possible modification of deleting a section relating to knowledge of earnings differentials, the test is commended to those involved in assessing and counseling the occupational choice process.
Bibliography Citation
Kohen, Andrew I. and Susan C. Breinich. "Knowledge of the World of Work: A Test of Occupational Information of Young Men." Journal of Vocational Behavior 6,1 (February 1975): 133-144.
8. Nafziger, Dean H.
Holland, J. L.
Helms, S. T.
McPartland, James M.
Applying an Occupational Classification to the Work Histories of Young Men and Women
Journal of Vocational Behavior 5,3 (December 1974): 331-345.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0001879174900232
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Holland's Typology; Mobility, Job; Occupational Aspirations; Work History

Holland's occupational classification is used to analyze work histories of young men and women ages 14 through 24. The analysis supports the usefulness of occupational classification for organizing work histories. The results indicate that for both sexes the classification reflected regular patterns for job changes. In addition, the category of a previous job is found to be a good predictor of subsequent jobs; likewise, the category of a current job forecasts the category of his/her vocational aspiration. Finally, consistency of an occupational code was related to job stability for whites.
Bibliography Citation
Nafziger, Dean H., J. L. Holland, S. T. Helms and James M. McPartland. "Applying an Occupational Classification to the Work Histories of Young Men and Women." Journal of Vocational Behavior 5,3 (December 1974): 331-345.
9. Parsons, George E.
Wigtil, James V.
Occupational Mobility as Measured by Holland's Theory of Career Selection
Journal of Vocational Behavior 5,3 (December 1974): 321-330.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0001879174900220
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Holland's Typology; Job Patterns; Job Tenure; Labor Turnover; Mobility, Occupational

This study examined occupational mobility as measured by Holland's theory of career selection and its relationship to older men in the work force. Stability was discussed in two distinct ways: (1) stability within a job, and (2) stability in the kind of work a man does over a career. In his research, Holland concluded that Realistic and Investigative personality types would change personality type less often and have more stable job choices in comparison to other personality types. The results of this study supported these findings to some extent, but also concluded that stability in a personality type was strongly influenced by the number of jobs available in a particular personality type and the structure of the labor market demand. In addition the results showed that psychological concepts seem to be more important in changing jobs than in selecting initial jobs.
Bibliography Citation
Parsons, George E. and James V. Wigtil. "Occupational Mobility as Measured by Holland's Theory of Career Selection." Journal of Vocational Behavior 5,3 (December 1974): 321-330.
10. Raelin, Joseph A.
A Comparative Study of Later Work Experience Among Full-Time, Part-Time, and Unemployed Male Youth
Journal of Vocational Behavior 19,3 (December 1981): 315-327.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/000187918190066X
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Duncan Index; Earnings; I.Q.; Job Satisfaction; Occupational Status; Part-Time Work; Unemployment

Male youth who are early entrants in the labor force and who spend the bulk of their work time in part-time employment do as well in their later work experience as full-time youth when controlling for demographic and work pattern variables. However, part-time employment leads to some job dissatisfaction. Youth who spend the bulk of their time unemployed, in their early careers, do not fare as well as the part-timers and full-timers. They suffer in particular from lower subsequent job satisfaction, which may have later social and psychological, if not economic, consequences.
Bibliography Citation
Raelin, Joseph A. "A Comparative Study of Later Work Experience Among Full-Time, Part-Time, and Unemployed Male Youth." Journal of Vocational Behavior 19,3 (December 1981): 315-327.