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Source: Journal of School Health
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Atkins, Robert L.
Association of Childhood Personality on Sexual Risk Taking During Adolescence
Journal of School Health 78,11 (November 2008): 594-600.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Age at First Intercourse; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Risk-Taking; Temperament; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

Background: Sexual risk taking during adolescence such as failure to use contraception or condoms is associated with premature parenthood and high rates of sexually transmitted infection. The relation of childhood personality to sexual risk taking during adolescence has been largely unexplored.

Methods: Using data collected from participants in the Child Sample of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (CS-NLSY) when they were 5 or 6 years of age (time 1) and 17 or 18 years of age (time 2), the relation of childhood personality to sexual risk taking during adolescence was investigated. Maternal ratings of childhood personality were used to derive resiliency, undercontrol, and overcontrol prototypical profile scores for a diverse sample of 1219 child participants from the CS-NLSY. At time 2, participants reported whether they failed to use oral contraception or condoms during their last sexual intercourse. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the association of personality to sexual risk taking.

Results: Proximity to the overcontrolled personality prototype at time 1 was associated with a decreased likelihood of sexual risk taking. Age, male gender, and childhood cognitive achievement were also significant predictors of sexual risk taking.

Conclusions: The findings suggest that children with personality profiles in which internalizing traits are more prominent are less likely than their peers to engage in sexual risk taking during late adolescence. The findings of this study augment previous studies that indicate that personality is an important predictor of development and underscore the importance of conducting research into the processes by which personality influences health behavior.

Bibliography Citation
Atkins, Robert L. "Association of Childhood Personality on Sexual Risk Taking During Adolescence." Journal of School Health 78,11 (November 2008): 594-600.
2. Connolly, Eric J.
Kavish, Nicholas
Cooke, Eric M.
Testing the Causal Hypothesis that Repeated Bullying Victimization Leads to Lower Levels of Educational Attainment: A Sibling-comparison Analysis
Journal of School Violence published online (31 May 2018): DOI: 10.1080/15388220.2018.1477603.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15388220.2018.1477603
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Bullying/Victimization; Educational Attainment; Siblings

Existing research suggests that repeated bullying victimization is associated with lower levels of educational attainment. However, it is difficult to ascertain whether a true causal association exists since previously reported associations may be confounded by genetic and shared environmental factors that affect both repeated bullying victimization and overall educational attainment. The present study aimed to address this issue by analyzing a sample of sibling pairs from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to examine between-family associations (where observable confounds are controlled for) and within-family associations (where observable and unobserved genetic and shared environmental confounds are controlled for). The results revealed that bullying victimization significantly reduced the odds of high school and college graduation when estimating between-family effects, but were rendered nonsignificant once within-family effects were controlled for. Implications of these results for future research on bullying victimization and educational attainment are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Connolly, Eric J., Nicholas Kavish and Eric M. Cooke. "Testing the Causal Hypothesis that Repeated Bullying Victimization Leads to Lower Levels of Educational Attainment: A Sibling-comparison Analysis." Journal of School Violence published online (31 May 2018): DOI: 10.1080/15388220.2018.1477603.
3. Hendrick, C. Emily
Cohen, Alison K.
Deardorff, Julianna
Cance, Jessica Duncan
Biological and Sociocultural Factors During the School Years Predicting Women's Lifetime Educational Attainment
Journal of School Health 86,3 (March 2016): 215-224.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/josh.12368/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Family Influences; Menarche; Well-Being

BACKGROUND: Lifetime educational attainment is an important predictor of health and well-being for women in the United States. In this study, we examine the roles of sociocultural factors in youth and an understudied biological life event, pubertal timing, in predicting women's lifetime educational attainment.

METHODS: Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (N = 3889), we conducted sequential multivariate linear regression analyses to investigate the influences of macro-level and family-level sociocultural contextual factors in youth (region of country, urbanicity, race/ethnicity, year of birth, household composition, mother's education, and mother's age at first birth) and early menarche, a marker of early pubertal development, on women's educational attainment after age 24.

RESULTS: Pubertal timing and all sociocultural factors in youth, other than year of birth, predicted women's lifetime educational attainment in bivariate models. Family factors had the strongest associations. When family factors were added to multivariate models, geographic region in youth, and pubertal timing were no longer significant.

CONCLUSION: Our findings provide additional evidence that family factors should be considered when developing comprehensive and inclusive interventions in childhood and adolescence to promote lifetime educational attainment among girls.

Bibliography Citation
Hendrick, C. Emily, Alison K. Cohen, Julianna Deardorff and Jessica Duncan Cance. "Biological and Sociocultural Factors During the School Years Predicting Women's Lifetime Educational Attainment." Journal of School Health 86,3 (March 2016): 215-224.
4. Lanza, H. Isabella
Huang, David Y.C.
Is Obesity Associated With School Dropout? Key Developmental and Ethnic Differences
Journal of School Health 85,10 (October 2015): 663-670.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/josh.12295/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Dropouts; Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; High School Completion/Graduates; Obesity

Background: We aimed to expand the literature on child obesity and school outcomes by examining associations between obesity and high school dropout, including the role of obesity onset and duration as well as ethnicity.

Method: Data on 5066 children obtained between 1986 and 2010 from the child cohort of the 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY79) were analyzed. Group-based trajectory analysis identified obesity trajectories from 6 to 18 years. School completion information from age 14 into young adulthood was used to calculate school dropout. Chi-square and pairwise comparison tests were used to identify significant associations between obesity trajectories and school dropout.

Results: Adolescents belonging to an increasing trajectory (adolescent-onset obesity) had a higher likelihood of dropping out of high school compared with those belonging to chronic, decreasing (childhood-only obesity), and nonobese trajectories. This association was particularly salient among white adolescents.

Conclusions: Obesity onset during early adolescence increased risk of high school dropout. White adolescents were particularly vulnerable. Given that early adolescence is marked by significant biological and social changes, future research should seek to identify the underlying processes linking adolescent obesity and school dropout to decrease school dropout risk among this vulnerable population.

Bibliography Citation
Lanza, H. Isabella and David Y.C. Huang. "Is Obesity Associated With School Dropout? Key Developmental and Ethnic Differences." Journal of School Health 85,10 (October 2015): 663-670.