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Source: Journal of Poverty
Resulting in 10 citations.
1. Beattie, Irenee Rose
High School and Women's Life Course: Curriculum Tracking, Race/Ethnicity, and Welfare Receipt
Journal of Poverty 15,1 (January-March 2011): 65-87.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10875549.2011.539404
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Academic Development; College Education; High School; High School Curriculum; Life Course; Welfare; Women's Education; Women's Studies

Life course scholarship considers how institutional contexts, such as schools, influence adolescent development. Likewise, educational scholars examine how high school experiences influence nonacademic life course outcomes. This study connects these disparate research areas to determine how high school curricular tracks relate to racial/ethnic differences in welfare dynamics. Using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979) data, the author finds that college preparatory coursework provides greater benefits to White women than to Black and Latina women in helping them avoid early welfare receipt. This benefit accrues largely through lowering their chances of dropping out of high school. Theoretical implications and relevance to the current policy environment are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Beattie, Irenee Rose. "High School and Women's Life Course: Curriculum Tracking, Race/Ethnicity, and Welfare Receipt." Journal of Poverty 15,1 (January-March 2011): 65-87.
2. Caputo, Richard K.
Becoming Poor and Using Public Assistance Programs
Journal of Poverty 3,1 (1999): 1-23.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J134v03n01_01
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Poverty; Welfare

Using logistic regression analysis on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study found that social psychological attributes failed to affect the likelihood of becoming poor and of using public assistance programs beyond that of sociodemographic characteristics. The number of years respondents lived in poverty was the best predictor of moving from above poverty in one year to below poverty the following year, while the number of years respondents lived in families that received public assistance was the best predictor of moving from self-support to entering into a public assistance program from one year to the next. Implications regarding the contemporary shift in the philosophy of social welfare from income maintenance to self-support are discussed. [Article copies available for a fee from The Haworth Document Delivery Service: 1800-342-9678. E-mail address: getinfo@haworthpressinc.com]. Copyright 1999 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Becoming Poor and Using Public Assistance Programs." Journal of Poverty 3,1 (1999): 1-23.
3. Caputo, Richard K.
Economic Mobility in a Youth Cohort, 1979-1997
Journal of Poverty 5,3 (2001): 39-63.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J134v05n03_03
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Economic Changes/Recession; Education; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Family Income; Gender Differences; Income; Income Level; Mobility; Mobility, Economic; Poverty; Racial Differences; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

Economic mobility in a youth cohort (n = 1956) was examined between 1979 and 1997. Increasing percentages of youth were found to reside in families with no change in economic status stratified by class. The rate of economic stasis of youth living in affluent families was more than twice that of those in middle-income families and more than four times that of those in poor families. Little variation in economic mobility was found among affluent families stratified by sex and ethnicity/race, although white males had less downward mobility than black females. Greater variation in economic mobility was found among poor families, with white males having greater upward mobility than other males and white females having greater upward mobility than black females and males. Finally, education was positively related to economic mobility for most sub-groups, as was receipt of SSI, while receipt of AFDC/TANF decreased economic mobility only among white males.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Economic Mobility in a Youth Cohort, 1979-1997." Journal of Poverty 5,3 (2001): 39-63.
4. Caputo, Richard K.
Head Start and School-to-Work Program Participation
Journal of Poverty 8,2 (2004): 25-42.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J134v08n02_02
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Head Start; High School Curriculum; Program Participation/Evaluation; Transition, School to Work

Using logistic regression analysis, this study of 4,540 high school students in the U. S. shows that Head Starters have a greater likelihood of participating in School-to-Work programs when controlling for curriculum type, school auspices, sex, race/ethnicity, and academic class level. Head Start participation makes no difference in regard to type of training among STW program participants. Evidence is mixed in regard to whether or not STW programs might constitute a de facto tracking system for Head Start graduates. Tracking appears to occur, but with positive and negative consequences. On one hand, findings suggest that Head Starters who participate in STW programs are more likely to remain in high school longer than non-STW participants. On the other hand, due to lower participation rates by white males, STW fails to achieve the sexual and racial/ethnic diversity requisite to ensure greater levels of academic rigor than might be the case otherwise. The author concludes that government educational programs designed for all socioeconomic groups can benefit those from economically disadvantaged families.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Head Start and School-to-Work Program Participation." Journal of Poverty 8,2 (2004): 25-42.
5. Caputo, Richard K.
Head Start, Poor Children, and Their Families
Journal of Poverty 2,2 (1998): 1-22.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J134v02n02_01
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Family Studies; Head Start; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Marital Status; Mothers; Mothers, Education; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Poverty; Racial Differences; Racial Studies; Residence; Welfare

This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the NLS's Child-Mother file to identify characteristics associated with the likelihood of poor children ever having participated in a Head Start program, and, among those who did, of their having lived in persistently poor families. Using logistic regression analysis on all children of survey year 1992 female respondents who had lived at least one year in poverty, the study found that number of years in poverty, race, and mother's marital status in 1992 were associated with the likelihood of a child's participating in Head Start. Among Head Start participants, mother's education level, mother's age at time of first birth, residency, the emotional dimension of the child's home environment, and mother's marital status were associated with persistent poverty. When number of years Head Start families received AFDC and/or Food Stamps was accounted for, only mother's marital status, residency, and number of years on public assistance were associated with persistent poverty. Policy implications were discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Head Start, Poor Children, and Their Families." Journal of Poverty 2,2 (1998): 1-22.
6. Caputo, Richard K.
Personal Retirement Accounts and the American Welfare State: A Study of Income Volatility and Socioeconomic Status as Correlates of PRA Support
Journal of Poverty 12,2 (June 2008): 229-250.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10875540801973625
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Retirement; Social Security; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Welfare

Based on a sample (n = 6,407) from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 cohort, this study found a sizable majority (69.1%) of support to replace a portion of Social Security with Private Retirement Accounts. Logistic regression analysis showed that SES was a robust predictor of PRA support, particularly for upper class vs. lower class respondents. Findings suggested that there may be less support for a major pillar of welfare state social provisioning, despite successful Congressional attempts to block related legislation to date, especially since the opinions of more affluent persons tend to have greater resonance with policymakers than those of lower income individuals. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "Personal Retirement Accounts and the American Welfare State: A Study of Income Volatility and Socioeconomic Status as Correlates of PRA Support." Journal of Poverty 12,2 (June 2008): 229-250.
7. Caputo, Richard K.
The GED as a Predictor of Mid-Life Health and Economic Well-Being
Journal of Poverty 9,4 (December 2005): 73-97.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J134v09n04_05
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Economic Well-Being; Family Income; GED/General Educational Diploma/General Equivalency Degree/General Educational Development; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Human Capital; Illnesses; Self-Reporting; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

Guided by human capital, socialization, and institutionalization theories, this study examined mid-life health and economic well-being of General Education Development (GED) certificate recipients. Relying on a study sample (N = 1,927) obtained from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, GED recipients were found to have worse mid-life outcomes than conventional high school graduates on measures of family income and depression and to have better mid-life outcomes than high school dropouts on measures of assets, family income, depression, and self-reported physical illnesses. Findings suggested that GED recipients should not be unnecessarily lumped together with high school graduates and that programs and services targeting potential and subsequent GED recipients and high school dropouts to remain in school might not only improve their mid-life labor market and economic outcomes, but also their physical and mental health. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Caputo, Richard K. "The GED as a Predictor of Mid-Life Health and Economic Well-Being." Journal of Poverty 9,4 (December 2005): 73-97.
8. Joseph, Alfred Louis
The Impact of Tracking: An Examination of Outcomes
Journal of Poverty 2,1 (1997): 1-21.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wpov20/2/1
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Education; Mobility, Social; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

The educational practice of tracking (ability grouping) is a widespread and controversial practice in the nation's schools. The charge has been made that poor, working-class and especially African-American schoolchildren are adversely impacted by this school policy. Critics believe that lower track children are not given the type of knowledge and instruction that allows for social mobility. Using a sample from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the author compares outcomes of 1900 tracked students. Results show that more than just the placement in academic tracks impacts outcomes for these young people. Race and class of origin are critical factors for life outcomes and also impact on who gets placed in which academic tracks. [Copyright 1998 by The Haworth Press. Article copies available for a fee from The Haworth Document Delivery Service: 1-800-342-9678. E-mail address: getinfo@, haworth.com]
Bibliography Citation
Joseph, Alfred Louis. "The Impact of Tracking: An Examination of Outcomes." Journal of Poverty 2,1 (1997): 1-21.
9. Owens, Mark F.
Baum, Charles L., II
The Effects of Federal Housing Assistance on Exiting Welfare and Becoming Employed for Welfare Recipients
Journal of Poverty 13,2 (2009): 130-151.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10875540902841705
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Employment; Labor Force Participation; Poverty; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Unemployment; Welfare

Welfare reform's success in encouraging employment may be affected by the federal housing program because many households receive welfare and housing assistance. Housing assistance could discourage employment because housing subsidies are reduced proportionally with earnings; alternatively, it could encourage employment by increasing stability and allowing more resources to be allocated toward employment-related expenses. We examine housing assistance's effects on exiting welfare and becoming employed. Remaining on welfare is positively associated with receiving housing assistance, but fixed effects models suggest this is due to correlation with unmeasured factors rather than a causal effect. We find little association between housing assistance and employment.
Bibliography Citation
Owens, Mark F. and Charles L. Baum. "The Effects of Federal Housing Assistance on Exiting Welfare and Becoming Employed for Welfare Recipients." Journal of Poverty 13,2 (2009): 130-151.
10. Petterson, Stephen Mark
Enemy Within: Black-White Differences in Fatalism and Joblessness
Journal of Poverty 3,3 (Fall 1999): 1-32
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Black Youth; Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Education; Family Background; Labor Market Outcomes; Racial Differences; Unemployment

There is an emergent consensus that the disposition of Black young men is an important determinant of their labor market troubles. The problem we are told is not labor market discrimination but the fatalistic attitudes (the "enemy within") held by many Black youth. This article uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine race differences in fatalism and joblessness. I find that the greater fatalism of Blacks is explained by their more disadvantaged background and subsequent problems in schools and the labor market, not to their distinctive cultural orientations. I also find a modest effect of measures of fatalism on subsequent joblessness and a more pronounced effect for more disadvantaged White and Black young men.
Bibliography Citation
Petterson, Stephen Mark. "Enemy Within: Black-White Differences in Fatalism and Joblessness." Journal of Poverty 3,3 (Fall 1999): 1-32.