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Source: Journal of Money, Credit and Banking
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Cunha, Flavio
Karahan, Fatih
Soares, Ilton
Returns to Skills and the College Premium
Journal of Money, Credit and Banking 43,s1 (August 2011): 39-86.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1538-4616.2011.00410.x/full
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Cognitive Ability; College Education; High School; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Skills

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A substantial literature documents the evolution of the college premium in the U.S. labor market over the last 40 years or so. There are at least three different interpretations of this fact: (i) shifts in the relative supply of and demand for college versus high school labor, (ii) shifts in the relative supply of and demand for skills in the college versus high school sector, and (iii) composition effects. We investigate how each of these components contributes to the dynamics of the college premium and find that all three play a role, but the increase in the college premium is primarily driven by the first component. We also find that during the 1980s, the college premium for high school workers diverged from the college premium for college workers and a substantial fraction of the gap that opens up is primarily due to the increase in the returns to cognitive skills
Bibliography Citation
Cunha, Flavio, Fatih Karahan and Ilton Soares. "Returns to Skills and the College Premium." Journal of Money, Credit and Banking 43,s1 (August 2011): 39-86.
2. Mustre-Del-Rio, Jose
Job Duration over the Business Cycle
Journal of Money, Credit and Banking published online (7 October 2018): DOI: 10.1111/jmcb.12565.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jmcb.12565
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Business Cycles; Job Patterns; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) suggests that the cyclicality of job duration depends on the worker's prior and future employment status. For example, among matches formed with previously nonemployed workers, those that end with the worker returning to nonemployment display procyclical duration. In contrast, matches that end because the worker switches to another job have countercyclical duration. Moreover, differences in starting wages do not account for these patterns.
Bibliography Citation
Mustre-Del-Rio, Jose. "Job Duration over the Business Cycle." Journal of Money, Credit and Banking published online (7 October 2018): DOI: 10.1111/jmcb.12565.