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Source: journal of management
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Judge, Timothy A.
Watanabe, Shinichiro
Is the Past Prologue?: A Test of Ghiselli's Hobo Syndrome
Journal of Management 21,2 (April1995): 211-229.
Also: http://jom.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/21/2/211
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Event History; Job Turnover; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Ghiselli (1974 observed that some workers possess internal impulses to migrate from one job to another, irrespective of better alternatives or other apparently rational motives. Ghiselli labeled this tendency the "hobo syndrome." The present study tested the validity of the hobo syndrome using a national longitudinal sample of young workers. Results of event history analyses indicated support for the hypothesis that turnover depends on the number of times an individual has left his or her job in the past. The meaning and implications of the results in light of recent dispositional research are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Judge, Timothy A. and Shinichiro Watanabe. "Is the Past Prologue?: A Test of Ghiselli's Hobo Syndrome." Journal of Management 21,2 (April1995): 211-229.
2. Riza, Shoshana Dobrow
Ganzach, Yoav
Liu, Yihao
Time and Job Satisfaction: A Longitudinal Study of the Differential Roles of Age and Tenure
Journal of Management 44,7 (September 2018): 2558-2579.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0149206315624962
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Job Rewards; Job Satisfaction; Job Tenure

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The relationship between job satisfaction and time is a fundamental question in organizational behavior. Yet given inconsistent results in the literature, the nature of this relationship has remained unresolved. Scholars' understanding of this relationship has been limited because studies have generally not simultaneously considered the two primary time metrics in job satisfaction research—age and tenure—and have instead relied on cross-sectional research designs. In this study, we develop and test an empirical model to provide a more definitive answer to the question of how age and tenure relate to job satisfaction. Our analyses draw on longitudinal data from 21,670 participants spanning a total of 34 waves of data collection across 40 years in two nationally representative samples. Multilevel analyses indicate that people became less satisfied as their tenure within a given organization increased, yet as people aged—and transitioned from organization to organization—their satisfaction increased. We also found that job rewards, as exemplified by pay, mediated these relationships. We discuss empirical, theoretical, and practical implications of our findings.
Bibliography Citation
Riza, Shoshana Dobrow, Yoav Ganzach and Yihao Liu. "Time and Job Satisfaction: A Longitudinal Study of the Differential Roles of Age and Tenure." Journal of Management 44,7 (September 2018): 2558-2579.