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Source: Journal of Family Psychology
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. Arocho, Rachel
Kamp Dush, Claire M.
Like Mother, Like Child: Offspring Marital Timing Desires and Maternal Marriage Timing and Stability
Journal of Family Psychology 31,3 (April 2017): 261-272.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/psycinfo/2016-28689-001/
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Expectations/Intentions; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Marital History/Transitions; Marital Stability; Marriage

Understanding the determinants of marital timing is critical because it has implications for marital functioning and divorce. One salient predictor of marital timing is youth's desires for marriage timing. To shine light on predictors of both desires for marital timing and the timing of marriage itself, we examine offspring marital desires and maternal marriage characteristics in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 (NLSY79) cohort and 1979 Child and Young Adult cohort (NLSY79-CYA; biological offspring of the women in the 1979 cohort). Analyses showed that maternal cohabitation postdivorce predicted decreased expectations to ever marry in offspring. Maternal age at marriage was positively associated with offspring desires for age at marriage, but only for those whose mothers had not divorced. Maternal marital age was significantly associated with the offspring's transition into marriage even when controlling for the offspring's desires for marriage timing, but neither maternal marriage age nor offspring desires for marital timing were associated with the timing of entrance into cohabitation, whereas maternal divorce was associated with earlier cohabitation. Our findings suggest that maternal marriage characteristics, particularly divorce, are significant predictors of millennials' desires for and experiences with romantic relationships. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Arocho, Rachel and Claire M. Kamp Dush. "Like Mother, Like Child: Offspring Marital Timing Desires and Maternal Marriage Timing and Stability." Journal of Family Psychology 31,3 (April 2017): 261-272.
2. Emery, Robert E.
Waldron, Mary
Kitzmann, Katherine M.
Aaron, Jeffrey
Delinquent Behavior, Future Divorce or Nonmarital Childbearing, and Externalizing Behavior Among Offspring: A 14-Year Prospective Study
Journal of Family Psychology 13,4 (December 1999): 568-579.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/fam/13/4/568/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Childbearing; Children, Behavioral Development; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Divorce; Family Income; Family Studies; Marital Status; Mothers, Behavior; Parents, Single; Poverty; Racial Differences

In a longitudinal study of a national sample, more externalizing behavior problems were found among 222 children from never-married and 142 children from divorced families than among 840 children from married families. However, delinquent behavior reported when future mothers were single, childless adolescents prospectively predicted their future marital status and behavior problems among their offspring 14 years later. Maternal history of delinquent behavior accounted for much, but not all, of the relationship between marital status and children's externalizing behavior. Divorce and nonmarital childbirth do not occur at random, and these findings demonstrate that marital status is predicted by individual characteristics as well as by demographic factors. These findings highlight the importance of cautiously interpreting the much-discussed correlation between marital status and children's behavior problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Emery, Robert E., Mary Waldron, Katherine M. Kitzmann and Jeffrey Aaron. "Delinquent Behavior, Future Divorce or Nonmarital Childbearing, and Externalizing Behavior Among Offspring: A 14-Year Prospective Study." Journal of Family Psychology 13,4 (December 1999): 568-579.
3. James, Spencer
Variation in Marital Quality in a National Sample of Divorced Women
Journal of Family Psychology 29,3 (June 2015): 479-489.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/fam/29/3/479.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Divorce; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Modeling, Latent Class Analysis/Latent Transition Analysis

Previous work has compared marital quality between stably married and divorced individuals. Less work has examined the possibility of variation among divorcés in trajectories of marital quality as divorce approaches. This study addressed that hole by first examining whether distinct trajectories of marital quality can be discerned among women whose marriages ended in divorce and, second, the profile of women who experienced each trajectory. Latent class growth analyses with longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample were used to “look backward” from the time of divorce. Although demographic and socioeconomic variables from this national sample did not predict the trajectories well, nearly 66% of divorced women reported relatively high levels of both happiness and communication and either low or moderate levels of conflict. Future research including personality or interactional patterns may lead to theoretical insights about patterns of marital quality in the years leading to divorce.
Bibliography Citation
James, Spencer. "Variation in Marital Quality in a National Sample of Divorced Women." Journal of Family Psychology 29,3 (June 2015): 479-489.
4. Mandara, Jelani
Varner, Fatima
Richman, Scott
Do African American Mothers Really "Love" Their Sons and "Raise" Their Daughters?
Journal of Family Psychology 24,1 (February 2010): 41-50.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0893320010600062
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Behavioral Differences; Behavioral Problems; Black Family; Black Studies; Gender Differences; Siblings; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

This study assessed 1500 adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth to test the hypothesis that African American mothers differentially socialize their girls and boys. The results showed that later-born boys had fewer chores, argued more with their mothers, lived in less cognitively stimulating homes, and were not allowed to make the same decisions as were the girls or firstborn boys at the same age. The later-born boys were also lowest in achievement and highest in externalizing behaviors. Parenting differences accounted for the achievement differences but not for the externalizing behavior differences. It was concluded that the later-born boys would achieve at the same rates as their siblings if they were socialized in the same manner as their siblings.
Bibliography Citation
Mandara, Jelani, Fatima Varner and Scott Richman. "Do African American Mothers Really "Love" Their Sons and "Raise" Their Daughters? ." Journal of Family Psychology 24,1 (February 2010): 41-50.
5. Mernitz, Sara E.
Kamp Dush, Claire M.
Emotional Health Across the Transition to First and Second Unions Among Emerging Adults
Journal of Family Psychology 30,2 (March 2016): 233-244.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/psycarticles/2015-47616-001
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Gender Differences; Health, Mental; Marital History/Transitions; Marriage; Modeling, Fixed Effects

The link between romantic relationships and emotional health has been extensively examined and suggests that marriage provides more emotional health benefits than cohabiting or dating relationships. However, the contemporary context of intimate relationships has changed and these associations warrant reexamination among emerging adults in the 2000s. We examined the change in emotional health across the entrance into first and second unions, including cohabiting unions, direct marriage (marriage without premarital cohabitation), and marriage preceded by cohabitation. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997, a nationally representative panel study of youth born between 1980 and 1984 in the United States, pooled fixed-effects regression models indicated that entrance into first cohabiting unions and direct marriages, and all second unions, were significantly associated with reduced emotional distress. Gender differences were found for first unions only; for men, only direct marriage was associated with an emotional health benefit, while both direct marriage and cohabitation benefited women's emotional health. (PsycINFO Database Record © 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Mernitz, Sara E. and Claire M. Kamp Dush. "Emotional Health Across the Transition to First and Second Unions Among Emerging Adults." Journal of Family Psychology 30,2 (March 2016): 233-244.
6. Petts, Richard James
Family, Religious Attendance, and Trajectories of Psychological Well-being among Youth
Journal of Family Psychology 28,6 (December 2014): 759-768.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/fam/28/6/759
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior, Antisocial; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Educational Attainment; Family Influences; Family Structure; Modeling, Multilevel; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Interaction; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Religion; Religious Influences; Transition, Adulthood

Despite numerous studies on adolescent well-being, longitudinal research on the influence of religion on well-being is lacking, and limited studies have looked at how family and religion may work in conjunction with one another to influence adolescent well-being. This study addresses these limitations by using longitudinal data on 5,739 youth to explore whether family structure, changes in family structure, parent–child relationship quality, and religious attendance (overall and with parents) influence trajectories of psychological well-being independently and in conjunction with one another. Results support previous research in showing that parental interaction and attending religious services with parent(s) in late childhood are associated with higher psychological well-being, whereas conflict with parents and residing in a nontraditional family in late childhood are associated with lower well-being among youth. Finally, there is evidence suggesting that attending religious services with parent(s) amplifies the positive influence of parental interaction on psychological well-being, and overall levels of religious attendance over time are less likely to increase well-being among adolescents raised by single parents than for adolescents raised by married parents. (PsycINFO Database Record © 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Petts, Richard James. "Family, Religious Attendance, and Trajectories of Psychological Well-being among Youth." Journal of Family Psychology 28,6 (December 2014): 759-768.
7. Ricciuti, Henry N.
Single Parenthood and School Readiness in White, Black, and Hispanic 6- and 7-year-olds
Journal of Family Psychology 13,3 (September 1999): 450-465.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S089332000200140X
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Care; Children, Academic Development; Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Family Characteristics; Gender Differences; Hispanics; Mothers, Education; Parents, Single; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Poverty; Racial Differences; School Entry/Readiness

The aim of this research was to examine the circumstances under which single parenthood may or may not represent an adverse influence on school readiness and achievement in 6-7-year-old children of White, Black, and Hispanic families in a large national survey (NLSY). Home visits provided measures of maternal and family characteristics and of children's vocabulary, math, reading, and behavior problems. Single parenthood was essentially unrelated to the child outcomes in all ethnic groups, and it did not interact with maternal education, ability level, or employment or with poverty status or child gender. Although single- and 2-parent families differed in income, they were very similar in maternal ability and education levels, thus suggesting that in the presence of positive maternal or family characteristics supportive of children's development, single parenthood as such need not represent a risk factor for these early child outcomes. ((c) 1999 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Ricciuti, Henry N. "Single Parenthood and School Readiness in White, Black, and Hispanic 6- and 7-year-olds." Journal of Family Psychology 13,3 (September 1999): 450-465.
8. Schindler, Holly S.
Coley, Rebekah Levine
Predicting Marital Separation: Do Parent–Child Relationships Matter?
Journal of Family Psychology 26,4 (August 2012): 499-508.
Also: DOI: 10.1037/a0028863
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Family Influences; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Marital Status; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness

This study used a family systems perspective in modeling predictors of marital separation within married-parent families with adolescents. Specifically, we examined whether mother–adolescent closeness and negativity, father–adolescent closeness and negativity, and couple relationship quality (mothers' and fathers' positive marital behaviors) prospectively predicted the likelihood of marital separation, operationalized as the father moving out of the household. Data were derived from the first 4 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 (n = 1649), assessing both biological and stepfather families. Results from complementary log–log analyses revealed that marital separations were related to complex family relationships. Specifically, greater mother–adolescent closeness predicted a higher likelihood of marital separation, whereas greater father–child closeness predicted a lower likelihood. In addition, mothers' more positive marital behaviors toward fathers predicted a lower likelihood of marital separation. Patterns were largely similar between biological and stepfather families, with the exception that mothers' positive marital behaviors toward fathers were more influential within biological father families.
(PsycINFO Database Record © 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Schindler, Holly S. and Rebekah Levine Coley. "Predicting Marital Separation: Do Parent–Child Relationships Matter? ." Journal of Family Psychology 26,4 (August 2012): 499-508.
9. Varner, Fatima
Mandara, Jelani
Marital Transitions and Changes in African American Mothers' Depressive Symptoms: The Buffering Role of Financial Resources.
Journal of Family Psychology 23,6 (December 2009): 839-847.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=search.displayRecord&uid=2009-23534-009
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Assets; Black Family; Depression (see also CESD); Divorce; Health, Mental; Marital Status

The effects of changes in marital status on the changes in depressive symptoms of 443 African American mothers from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY) were examined. Results showed that those mothers who exited marriage increased in depressive symptoms relative to continuously married and newly married mothers. Moreover, mothers who entered marriage later experienced the same level of depressive symptoms as continuously married mothers. However, financial resources moderated the effects of marital transitions. Those mothers with more financial resources did not experience an increase in depressive symptoms after divorce, but those with fewer resources experienced a large increase. It was concluded that divorce is a risk factor for mental health concerns among African American mothers, but financial resources serve as a protective factor.
Bibliography Citation
Varner, Fatima and Jelani Mandara. "Marital Transitions and Changes in African American Mothers' Depressive Symptoms: The Buffering Role of Financial Resources." Journal of Family Psychology 23,6 (December 2009): 839-847.