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Source: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Chalfin, Aaron
Deza, Monica
The Intergenerational Effects of Education on Delinquency
Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization published online (25 August 2017): DOI: doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2017.07.034.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167268117302123
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Educational Attainment; Geocoded Data; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Parental Influences; State-Level Data/Policy

Children of less educated parents are more likely to engage in delinquent behavior. One explanation for this is that better educated parents are inherently more likely to raise children in ways that are less conducive to criminal participation. Alternatively, additional parental education may change parents' behavior in ways that reduces their children's propensity to commit crime. Using data from the NLSY79 and variation induced by changes in compulsory schooling laws in the United States, we find that an increase in parental education reduces delinquent behavior among the children of those exposed to compulsory schooling laws. This research is the first to uncover evidence of an intergenerational effect of education on crime in the United States. We conclude that previous analyses of compulsory schooling laws − and investments in education more generally − appreciably underestimate the full benefits of investments in education.
Bibliography Citation
Chalfin, Aaron and Monica Deza. "The Intergenerational Effects of Education on Delinquency." Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization published online (25 August 2017): DOI: doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2017.07.034.
2. Williams, Geoffrey
Property Crime: Investigating Career Patterns and Earnings
Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 119 (November 2015): 124-138.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016726811500205X
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Crime; Earnings; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

I investigate self-reported theft data in the NLSY 1997 Cohort for the years 1997-2011. Several striking patterns emerge. First, individuals appear to be active thieves for extremely short periods - in most cases in only one year, and fewer than 5% of thieves for more than three years out of the 15 years of data. Second, self-reported earnings from theft are generally very low and there is little evidence of "successful" criminals or consistent earnings from theft. Third, measures that proxy impatience (smoking, for example) are highly correlated with theft. Fourthly, thieves and non-thieves have similar earnings during the years of peak theft activity, but thieves have lower earnings in their late 20s (after most have long since stopped committing theft). Attrition of survey respondents, underreporting and incapacitation effects do not appear to explain this. There may be "professional thieves" too rare to show up in even large samples such as the NLSY. Theft in the United States thus appears to be substantially a phenomenon of individuals entering a temporary period of intensified risk-taking in adolescence.
Bibliography Citation
Williams, Geoffrey. "Property Crime: Investigating Career Patterns and Earnings." Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 119 (November 2015): 124-138.
3. Xia, Xiaoyu
Forming Wage Expectations through Learning: Evidence from College Major Choices
Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 132,A (December 2016): 176-196.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167268116302426
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Learning Hypothesis; Occupations; Siblings; Wages

How do college students choose their majors, and what role does the family play in their choices? I use data from two major longitudinal surveys to develop and estimate a model in which students learn about earning opportunities associated with different majors through the wages of older siblings and parents. The probability of a student choosing a major that corresponds to the occupation of a family member is strongly correlated with the family member's wage at the time the major choice is made. This correlation remains strong after controlling for family-correlated abilities or preferences, and additional empirical evidence suggests that the observed correlation arises through a family-based wage information channel.
Bibliography Citation
Xia, Xiaoyu. "Forming Wage Expectations through Learning: Evidence from College Major Choices." Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 132,A (December 2016): 176-196.