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Source: Journal of Child and Family Studies
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Abar, Caitlin C.
Clark, Gabrielle
Koban, Kaitlyn
The Long-Term Impact of Family Routines and Parental Knowledge on Alcohol Use and Health Behaviors: Results from a 14 Year Follow-Up
Journal of Child and Family Studies 26,9 (September 2017): 2495-2504.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10826-017-0752-2
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Adolescent health; Alcohol Use; Family Environment; Family Influences; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenting Skills/Styles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous research has found significant associations between family routines (e.g., time shared and family meals), parenting characteristics, and later adolescent health behaviors. In general, greater family interactions, parental monitoring, and more optimal parenting style have been associated with less alcohol use during adolescence. We expanded upon this work by examining effects of family and parenting characteristics on alcohol use and health behaviors during young adulthood. We also followed tenets of the Contextual Model of Parenting by examining the moderating effects of parenting style on the associations between parent/family practices and outcomes. Data came from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. A total of 5419 youth were surveyed at 12-14 years of age, and then annually for the next 14 years; 4565 were surveyed at a 10 year follow-up and 4539 were examined at the 14 year follow-up (84% retention). Multivariate models, controlling for sex and race/ethnicity, indicated that, in general, family routines and parental knowledge in early adolescence were associated with healthier behaviors at both the 10-year and 14-follow-ups. Results also showed that the protective effects of parental knowledge and family routines were strongest in families characterized by and authoritative parenting style.
Bibliography Citation
Abar, Caitlin C., Gabrielle Clark and Kaitlyn Koban. "The Long-Term Impact of Family Routines and Parental Knowledge on Alcohol Use and Health Behaviors: Results from a 14 Year Follow-Up." Journal of Child and Family Studies 26,9 (September 2017): 2495-2504.
2. Eshbaugh, Elaine M.
Perceptions of Family Relationship Factors and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents: What Roles Do Parents and Gender Play?
Journal of Child and Family Studies 17,1 (February 2008): 127-139
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Family Characteristics; Gender Differences; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The association of adolescents' perceptions of family relationships and adolescent depressive symptoms was investigated using a sample of 2,918 youth participating in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Boys showed fewer depressive symptoms than girls, as hypothesized. In general, adolescents' perceptions of family relationships were negatively related to depressive symptoms. Mother support of father predicted depressive symptoms for girls only, whereas father support of mother predicted depressive symptoms for boys only. These findings contradict previous research that suggested family functioning is more related to outcomes of adolescent girls than boys. Suggestions for future research and implications for marital and family therapists are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Child & Family Studies is the property of Springer Science & Business Media B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Eshbaugh, Elaine M. "Perceptions of Family Relationship Factors and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents: What Roles Do Parents and Gender Play?" Journal of Child and Family Studies 17,1 (February 2008): 127-139.
3. Hong, Jun Sung
Eamon, Mary Keegan
Students’ Perceptions of Unsafe Schools: An Ecological Systems Analysis
Journal of Child and Family Studies 21,3 (June 2012): 428-438.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/w1703k12un5043g3/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Children, Well-Being; Handguns, carrying or using; Neighborhood Effects; Parenting Skills/Styles; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In the aftermath of several school shooting incidents in recent years, students’ perceptions of unsafe schools has been a major concern for parents, teachers, school officials, school practitioners, and policy-makers. Using Bronfenbrenner’s ecological systems framework, we examined the micro-, meso-, and exosystem level factors associated with perceptions of unsafe school environments in a nationally representative sample of 10- to 15-year-old youth in the United States. We found that for the socio-demographic characteristics, students who were older, male, and poor had increased risks of perceiving higher levels of unsafe school environments. Within the microsystem of the family, our results indicate that parent-youth discussions of school activities/events decreased the risk of students perceiving unsafe schools. All of the school environment variables—ease of making friends, teachers’ involvement, observed weapon carrying, and school rule enforcement—were related in the expected direction to students’ perceiving their schools as unsafe. At the mesosystem level, findings from our study demonstrate that variables measuring parental school involvement were unrelated to perceptions of school safety. Finally, at the exosystem level, we found that students’ perceptions of residing in a safer neighborhood and residence in a non-central city metropolitan area, compared with a central city, decreased the odds of perceiving school environments as unsafe. School policy and practice implications are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Hong, Jun Sung and Mary Keegan Eamon. "Students’ Perceptions of Unsafe Schools: An Ecological Systems Analysis ." Journal of Child and Family Studies 21,3 (June 2012): 428-438.
4. Huang, David Y.C.
Lanza, H. Isabella
Anglin, M. Douglas
Trajectory of Adolescent Obesity: Exploring the Impact of Prenatal to Childhood Experiences
Journal of Child and Family Studies 23,6 (August 2014): 1090-1101.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10826-013-9766-6
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Birthweight; Body Mass Index (BMI); CESD (Depression Scale); Child Health; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Depression (see also CESD); Discipline; Drug Use; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Multilevel; Mothers, Behavior; Mothers, Health; Obesity; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Interaction; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Substance Use; Television Viewing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examined longitudinal associations of prenatal exposures as well as childhood familial experiences with obesity status from ages 10 to 18. Hierarchical generalized linear modeling was applied to examine 5,156 adolescents from the child sample of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Higher maternal weight, maternal smoking during pregnancy, lower maternal education, and lack of infant breastfeeding were contributors to elevated adolescent obesity risk in early adolescence. However, maternal age, high birth weight of child, and maternal annual income exhibited long-lasting impact on obesity risk over time throughout adolescence. Additionally, childhood familial experiences were significantly related to risk of adolescent obesity. Appropriate use of family rules in the home and parental engagement in children’s daily activities lowered adolescent obesity risk, but excessive television viewing heightened adolescent obesity risk. Implementation of consistent family rules and parental engagement may benefit adolescents at risk for obesity.
Bibliography Citation
Huang, David Y.C., H. Isabella Lanza and M. Douglas Anglin. "Trajectory of Adolescent Obesity: Exploring the Impact of Prenatal to Childhood Experiences." Journal of Child and Family Studies 23,6 (August 2014): 1090-1101.
5. Huang, David Y.C.
Murphy, Debra A.
Hser, Yih-Ing
Parental Monitoring During Early Adolescence Deters Adolescent Sexual Initiation: Discrete-Time Survival Mixture Analysis
Journal of Child and Family Studies 20,4 (August 2011): 511-520.
Also: http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=5355e362-ae68-4223-aa4d-e6639b118943%40sessionmgr13&vid=1&hid=13&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=ehh&AN=62544454
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Age at First Intercourse; Behavioral Differences; Behavioral Problems; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Ethnic Differences; Modeling; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Racial Differences; Risk-Taking; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We used discrete-time survival mixture modeling to examine 5,305 adolescents from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth regarding the impact of parental monitoring during early adolescence (ages 14-16) on initiation of sexual intercourse and problem behavior engagement (ages 14-23). Four distinctive parental-monitoring groups were identified and labeled as 'High,' 'Increasing,' 'Decreasing,' and 'Low'. About 68% of adolescents received a high level of parental monitoring from ages 14 to 16 (High), 6 and 9% respectively exhibited an accelerated (Increasing) and a decelerated trajectory (Decreasing), and 17% had consistently low parental monitoring (Low). Relative to participants in the Low group, adolescents in the High group delayed sexual initiation by 1.5 years. Males, relative to females, were more likely to have had a low trajectory of parental monitoring, and were more likely to initiate sexual intercourse before age 14. In contrast to White Adolescents, Hispanics and Blacks were less likely to receive High parental monitoring, and had a higher rate of early sexual initiation before age 14. The study demonstrates the temporal relationship of parental monitoring with adolescent sexual initiation from a longitudinal perspective. An increase of parental monitoring across ages is accompanied with a decrease of sexual risk. The continual high level of parental monitoring from ages 14 to 16 also mitigated the risk of engagement in substance use and delinquent behaviors from ages 14 to 23. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Child & Family Studies is the property of Springer Science & Business Media B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the ori ginal published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Huang, David Y.C., Debra A. Murphy and Yih-Ing Hser. "Parental Monitoring During Early Adolescence Deters Adolescent Sexual Initiation: Discrete-Time Survival Mixture Analysis." Journal of Child and Family Studies 20,4 (August 2011): 511-520.
6. Landers, Monica D.
Mitchell, Ojmarrh
Coates, Erica E.
Teenage Fatherhood as a Potential Turning Point in the Lives of Delinquent Youth
Journal of Child and Family Studies 24,6 (June 2015): 1685-1696.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10826-014-9971-y
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Arrests; Crime; Criminal Justice System; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Fatherhood; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Presence; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The present study examines whether fatherhood, generally, and residential fatherhood, specifically, predicts desistance from criminal behavior and reduced contact with the criminal justice system among delinquent teens. Using multiple waves of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, two models were estimated and analyzed via fixed-effects negative binomial regression comparing periods of residential fatherhood to periods of non-residential fatherhood and non-fatherhood. Results indicated that nonresidential fatherhood placed delinquent teens at greater odds for future arrest compared to residential fatherhood. Further, delinquent teens when residing with their children reported less offending behaviors, such as marijuana use and drug distribution, compared to periods when they did not reside with their children.
Bibliography Citation
Landers, Monica D., Ojmarrh Mitchell and Erica E. Coates. "Teenage Fatherhood as a Potential Turning Point in the Lives of Delinquent Youth." Journal of Child and Family Studies 24,6 (June 2015): 1685-1696.
7. Menard, Jessica
Knezevic, Bojana
Miller, Scott R.
Edelstein, Daniel
Thompson, Kristi
Miller, Carlin J.
Intergenerational Transmission of Antisocial Behavior and Age at Primiparity
Journal of Child and Family Studies 24,3 (March 2015): 798-808.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10826-013-9890-3
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Adolescent Fertility; Age at Birth; Age at First Birth; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Bullying/Victimization; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Adolescent; Mothers, Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study developed a model linking maternal and offspring antisocial behavior, with particular emphasis on whether this link is especially strong in teenage mother-child dyads. Data were taken from a longitudinal government dataset; structural equation modeling and invariance testing was used to test the hypotheses. Good model fit indicated that maternal and offspring antisociality are linked, and antisocial behavior persists across childhood, but that these relationships are not dependent on the mother's age at primiparity. These results suggest that although maternal behavior predicts offspring antisociality, being the child of a teenage mother is not an independent risk factor for the development of antisociality. Given that mothers in general tend to transmit their antisocial behavior patterns, intervention for antisocial behavior patterns in females before or during adolescence should contribute to a significant lessening of not only their own behavior problems, but also the incidence of antisocial behavior in their future offspring.
Bibliography Citation
Menard, Jessica, Bojana Knezevic, Scott R. Miller, Daniel Edelstein, Kristi Thompson and Carlin J. Miller. "Intergenerational Transmission of Antisocial Behavior and Age at Primiparity." Journal of Child and Family Studies 24,3 (March 2015): 798-808.
8. Trella, Rachel N. Schentag
Miller, Scott R.
Edelstein, Daniel
Miller, Carlin J.
Maternal Behavior Prior to Parenting as a Transgenerational Predictor of Offspring Behavior
Journal of Child and Family Studies 23,8 (November 2014): 1501-1509.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10826-013-9806-2
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Family Income; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Behavior

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Behavior problems influence development at multiple stages over the lifespan. The present study explores the relations between maternal behavior prior to parenting and offspring behavior problems in childhood and adolescence using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data (N = 2,820 dyads with 50.0 % male offspring and 52.2 % of ethnic/racial minority status). Index scores for behavior problems were created for mothers prior to parenting and for offspring at two time points. Path analyses indicated that maternal behavior problems prior to parenthood predicted offspring being at increased risk for behavior problems in childhood and adolescence. Mothers� behavior had a significant influence on adolescent behavior, even after childhood behavior problems and demographic covariates were taken into account. Post-hoc analyses demonstrated the stability of behavior problems is especially strong for males. Results support a long tradition of research and the external validity of the stability of behavior problems as well as the importance of maternal behavior prior to parenthood for their future offspring across development. Clinical and policy implications are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Trella, Rachel N. Schentag, Scott R. Miller, Daniel Edelstein and Carlin J. Miller. "Maternal Behavior Prior to Parenting as a Transgenerational Predictor of Offspring Behavior." Journal of Child and Family Studies 23,8 (November 2014): 1501-1509.