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Source: Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse
Resulting in 11 citations.
1. Chapple, Constance L.
Hope, Trina L.
Whiteford, Scott W.
The Direct and Indirect Effects of Parental Bonds, Parental Drug Use, and Self-Control on Adolescent Substance Use
Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 14,3 (2005): 17-38.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J029v14n03_02
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Drug Use; Mothers, Behavior; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parenting Skills/Styles; Scale Construction; Self-Regulation/Self-Control; Substance Use

Research indicates that parenting has important effects on adolescent substance use. However, the indirect effect of parenting on adolescent substance use via self-control is less understood. Gottfredson and Hirschi's General Theory of Crime has been extensively tested by researchers in the field of criminology, but the theory rarely has been used to predict adolescent substance use. Although Goffredson and Hirschi clearly assume that self-control is predicated on parenting, its mediating effect is rarely assessed. We find direct effects of self-control and maternal marijuana use on substance use and also find that self-control mediates the relationship between other parenting variables and adolescent substance use.
Bibliography Citation
Chapple, Constance L., Trina L. Hope and Scott W. Whiteford. "The Direct and Indirect Effects of Parental Bonds, Parental Drug Use, and Self-Control on Adolescent Substance Use." Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 14,3 (2005): 17-38.
2. Clapp, John D.
Shillington, Audrey M.
A Public Health Model of Alcohol Use and Related Problems: Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 10,3 (2001): 21-41.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J029v10n03_02
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Modeling; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Youth Problems

Using data from the 1994 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this paper presents a public health model of alcohol intensity and attendant consequences among adolescents. We use path analyses to examine the influence of agent (beverage of choice), host (individual characteristics), and environment (contexts of drinking) on an index of alcohol intensity and three factor-based indexes of alcohol-related consequences. Our analyses suggest that males, adolescents who begin drinking at a younger age, and older adolescents drink with more intensity. Similarly, teenagers that drink in private contexts, perceive the majority of their friends to be drinkers, and prefer beer over other beverages tend to drink more intensely. Drinking in private contexts is also a contributing facto to Loss of Control and School/Work problems regardless of other predictors. Implications for prevention practice and future research are offered.
Bibliography Citation
Clapp, John D. and Audrey M. Shillington. "A Public Health Model of Alcohol Use and Related Problems: Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 10,3 (2001): 21-41.
3. Dooley, David
Prause, JoAnn
Predictors of Early Alcohol Drinking Onset
Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 16,2 (Spring 2006): 1-29.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J029v16n02_01
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Drug Use; Substance Use

Early alcohol drinking onset (ADO) has been implicated as a cause of adult alcohol disorder inviting interventions that target the causes of ADO. This study explores the precursors of early ADO using variables measured before drinking onset, reaching back to the mothers of the respondents. The sample consists of children of the women respondents in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (79) who were 11 or 12 and still not drinking in the baseline interviews and who were re-interviewed two years later (n = 1951). The risk of drinking onset by age 13 or 14 was higher for three distal predictors: if mothers began drinking at age 14 or younger, if the respondent is female, and if the respondent was high on the Headstrong dimension of the Behavior Problems Index measured before age 6. More proximal predictors (measured at baseline) included loneliness (negatively) living with mother only, older, multiple problem behaviors, and no adult home after school. Implications for research and prevention are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse is the property of Haworth and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Dooley, David and JoAnn Prause. "Predictors of Early Alcohol Drinking Onset." Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 16,2 (Spring 2006): 1-29.
4. Dooley, David
Prause, JoAnn
Ham-Rowbottom, Kathleen A.
Emptage, Nicholas P.
Age of Alcohol Drinking Onset Precursors and the Mediation of Alcohol Disorder
Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 15,2 (January 2006): 19-37.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J029v15n02_02
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Crime; Depression (see also CESD); Family History; Family Structure; Hispanics; Self-Esteem

This study explored early alcohol drinking onset (ADO), its precursors, and the mechanisms by which it leads to later alcohol disorder. Data came from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth with ADO items from 1982 and 1983, and alcohol symptoms from 1989 and 1994. Drinking began earlier for respondents who were male, younger, non-Hispanic, non-African-American, and later born, and for those not living with both parents at age 14, ever charged with an illegal act, and with a family history of alcohol problems, lower academic aptitude, or less frequent religious attendance (n = 8165). Early ADO predicted 1994 abuse and dependence even after controlling for such potential mediators as 1987 self-esteem, 1989 alcohol disorder, and 1992 depression (n = 5643).
Bibliography Citation
Dooley, David, JoAnn Prause, Kathleen A. Ham-Rowbottom and Nicholas P. Emptage. "Age of Alcohol Drinking Onset Precursors and the Mediation of Alcohol Disorder." Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 15,2 (January 2006): 19-37.
5. Prause, JoAnn
Dooley, David
Ham-Rowbottom, Kathleen A.
Emptage, Nicholas P.
Alcohol Drinking Onset: A Reliability Study
Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 16,4 (Summer 2007): 79-90.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J029v16n04_05
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavioral Differences; Children; Family Influences; Self-Reporting; Substance Use

Early alcohol drinking onset (ADO) is associated with adult alcohol misuse, but the accuracy of ADO is unclear. Reliability of self-reported ADO was studied in two panels of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. For the Adult sample (n = 6,215), the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was .36. Older respondents had higher reliabilities and reported later ADO than younger ones. In the Child/ Young Adult sample, reliability varied from .19 for children 11 and 13 years old to .29 for children 12 and 14 years old. These low reliabilities and the age effect in reported ADO may affect epidemiologic research and interventions using this variable. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse is the property of Haworth and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Prause, JoAnn, David Dooley, Kathleen A. Ham-Rowbottom and Nicholas P. Emptage. "Alcohol Drinking Onset: A Reliability Study." Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 16,4 (Summer 2007): 79-90.
6. Shillington, Audrey M.
Clapp, John D.
Kicking the Camel: Adolescent Smoking Behaviors After Two Years
Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 10,2 (2000): 53-80.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J029v10n02_05
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Hispanics; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations

The Public Health Model views chemical dependency and acute substance problems as the interaction of three domains: the agent, the host and the environment. This model was used to examine the relationships between smoking severity - never smokers, former smokers and continued smokers - an host and environmental variables in a two-year follow-up study. Our results indicate that former smokers are more like never smokers on most of the risk and protective variables examined. Final anylases indicate that continued smokers are more likely to be Hispanic and Non-Black, Non-Hispanic, be older, to have a more distant maternal relationship, to have used alcohol, to feel peer pressure to try cigarettes and have substance using mothers at time 1 compared to never and former smokers. The implications of these results for prevention, practice and future research are discussed. NOTE: The dependent variable was drawn from the 1992 and 1994 CSAS and the 1994 Young Adult survey.
Bibliography Citation
Shillington, Audrey M. and John D. Clapp. "Kicking the Camel: Adolescent Smoking Behaviors After Two Years." Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 10,2 (2000): 53-80.
7. Shillington, Audrey M.
Clapp, John D.
Reed, Mark B.
The Stability of Self-Reported Marijuana Use across Eight Years of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 20,5 (2011): 407-420.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wcas20/20/5
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Drug Use; Gender Differences; Racial Differences; Self-Reporting; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examined teen marijuana report stability over 8 years. The stability of self-reports refers to the consistency of self-reported use across several years. This study used fives waves of data across 8 years from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Analyses were conducted to examine the internal or within-wave consistency as well as external or across-waves consistency for self-reported marijuana use. Further tests were conducted to identify if there were any differences for age, ethnicity, and sex for report consistency. Report stability was higher for lifetime use reports than the age of onset reports. Wave-by-wave differences revealed stability remained at acceptable levels in nearly all comparisons at agreement being about 75%. Overall, report agreement was higher for females, older adolescents, and non-Hispanic/non-black youths in bivariate analyses. However, only older chronological age remained consistently significantly associated with better report stability in multiple logistic regression models. Implications regarding misclassification of users for prevention programs and measurement issues are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Shillington, Audrey M., John D. Clapp and Mark B. Reed. "The Stability of Self-Reported Marijuana Use across Eight Years of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 20,5 (2011): 407-420.
8. Shillington, Audrey M.
Clapp, John D.
Reed, Mark B.
Woodruff, Susan I.
Adolescent Alcohol Use Self-Report Stability: A Decade of Panel Study Data
Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 20,1 (January 2011): 63-81.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1067828X.2011.534366
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Gender Differences; Life Course; Racial Differences; Self-Reporting

This study analyzed six waves of panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). These analyses were conducted to test the stability of self-reported lifetime use and age of onset. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) indicated that the stability of age of onset reports decreased with longer time frames between follow-ups. The percentage of youths who had discrepancies in self-reported ever use of alcohol at two-year follow-up ranged from 15% to 35%. Higher discrepancy rates were found for males and younger respondents. Differences in report stability as a function of race/ethnicity were minimal. Questions related to lifetime use and age of onset have implications for the study of lifetime trajectories of use and the timing of prevention programs. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Shillington, Audrey M., John D. Clapp, Mark B. Reed and Susan I. Woodruff. "Adolescent Alcohol Use Self-Report Stability: A Decade of Panel Study Data." Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 20,1 (January 2011): 63-81.
9. Shillington, Audrey M.
Reed, Mark B.
Clapp, John D.
Self-Report Stability of Adolescent Cigarette Use Across Ten Years of Panel Study Data.
Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 19,2 (April 2010): 171-191.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10678281003635089
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Gender Differences; Self-Reporting

This study is the first to examine adolescent cigarette report stability over 10 years. Six waves of data were utilized from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. This study examined internal/logical consistency and external consistency. Report stability was higher for lifetime use reports than the age of onset reports. Wave-by-wave differences revealed stability increased across time, with one-third denying use in the first two wave comparisons but dropping to 20% by the last comparison. Overall, report agreement was higher for females, older adolescents, and non-Hispanic/non-black youths. Implications regarding misclassification of users for prevention programs and measurement issues are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Shillington, Audrey M., Mark B. Reed and John D. Clapp. "Self-Report Stability of Adolescent Cigarette Use Across Ten Years of Panel Study Data." Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 19,2 (April 2010): 171-191.
10. Shillington, Audrey M.
Woodruff, Susan I.
Clapp, John D.
Reed, Mark B.
Lemus, Hector
Self-Reported Age of Onset and Telescoping for Cigarettes, Alcohol, and Marijuana: Across Eight Years of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 21,4 (September 2012): 333-348.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1067828X.2012.710026
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Age and Ageing; Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Smoking, drinking, and illicit drug use are leading causes of morbidity and mortality, both during adolescence as well as later in life. The determination of how well national and local policy and intervention efforts address teen substance use depends largely on the collection of valid and accurate data. Assessments of substance use rely heavily on retrospective self-report measures, but the reliability and validity, however, may be limited by various sources of measurement error. This study utilizes four waves of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth spanning eight years. Results from multiple linear regression analyses showed that the single most consistent variable associated with telescoping was the number of years since the substance was first reported. Time since first report was the single consistent variable and was strongly associated with telescoping in each wave-to-wave comparison for all three substances under study. Implications for policy and research are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Shillington, Audrey M., Susan I. Woodruff, John D. Clapp, Mark B. Reed and Hector Lemus. "Self-Reported Age of Onset and Telescoping for Cigarettes, Alcohol, and Marijuana: Across Eight Years of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 21,4 (September 2012): 333-348.
11. Tyler, Kimberly A.
Stone, Rosalie Torres
Bersani, Bianca Elizabeth
Examining the Changing Influence of Predictors on Adolescent Alcohol Misuse
Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 16,2 (November 2006): 95-114.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J029v16n02_05
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Gender Differences; Mothers, Behavior; Parenting Skills/Styles; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Racial Differences; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; School Suspension/Expulsion

The purpose of this study was to examine whether the influence of key characteristics on adolescent alcohol misuse (i.e., maternal binge drinking, parenting, peers, school characteristics, and the adolescent's own behavior) change over time and whether predictors of adolescent alcohol misuse vary by gender and race/ethnicity. Using prospective, longitudinal data from a community sample, results revealed that mother's binge drinking, peer drinking, and an early age of onset predicted higher levels of alcohol misuse when respondents were 14 to 16 years of age. Two years later, when adolescents were 16 to 18 years of age, maternal binge drinking was no longer significant, however, maternal attachment, school attachment, peer drinking, and early age of onset were found to significantly predict adolescent alcohol misuse. Race differences were found for maternal binge drinking and gender differences were found for school suspension and maternal monitoring on adolescent drinking.
Bibliography Citation
Tyler, Kimberly A., Rosalie Torres Stone and Bianca Elizabeth Bersani. "Examining the Changing Influence of Predictors on Adolescent Alcohol Misuse." Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 16,2 (November 2006): 95-114.