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Source: Journal of Biosocial Science
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Buster, Maury Allen
Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Genetic and Environmental Influences on Alcohol Use: DF Analysis of NLSY Kinship Data
Journal of Biosocial Science 32,2 (April 2000): 177-189.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9937&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0021932000001772
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Adoption; Alcohol Use; Family History; Gender Differences; Genetics; Kinship; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Pairs (also see Siblings); Racial Differences; Risk-Taking; Self-Esteem; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research designs to study alcohol use and abuse have included twin, adoption and family history/high risk studies. Results have consistently implied a genetic factor in the aetiology of alcohol abuse. However, less research has been conducted in search of environmental factors. This study uses kinship structure in a large national dataset (the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth) to estimate (using DeFries-Fulker analysis) the extent of the shared genetic, non-shared genetic, shared environmental and non-shared environmental influences on alcohol use. The NLSY kinship sample contained 3890 pairs of cousins, half-siblings, full-siblings and twins between the ages of 14 and 21 in the initial year of the survey (1979). Estimates of heritability (h2) and shared environment (c2) were small to moderate for the entire dataset for both light drinking and heavy drinking behaviour, with h2 estimates slightly higher in each case. Non-shared genetic measures of self-esteem and locus of control accounted for a significant portion of the remaining variance in heavy drinking behaviour. Race and gender patterns showed c2 and h2 estimates that were also small to moderate for both light and heavy drinking behaviour. Significant non-shared effects were found for the White group for heavy drinking behaviour, and for male pairs for both heavy and light drinking behaviour. Additionally, implications and future directions are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Buster, Maury Allen and Joseph Lee Rodgers. "Genetic and Environmental Influences on Alcohol Use: DF Analysis of NLSY Kinship Data." Journal of Biosocial Science 32,2 (April 2000): 177-189.
2. Fu, Haishan
Goldman, Noreen
The Association Between Health-Related Behaviours and the Risk of Divorce in the USA
Journal of Biosocial Science 32,1 (January 2000): 63-88.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9921&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0021932000000638
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Divorce; Drug Use; Health Factors; Height; Marital Dissolution; Marriage; Obesity; Physical Characteristics; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979-1993, are drawn on to investigate the link between health-related variables and risks of divorce. Findings indicate that physical characteristics associated with poor health - namely, obesity and short stature - are not significantly related to risks of marital dissolution for either men or women. On the other hand, risk-taking behaviors - eg, smoking and drug use - are strongly related to higher risks of divorce for both sexes. Overall, results emphasize the need to accommodate health-related variables in the dominant economic and social psychological theories of marital dissolution.
Bibliography Citation
Fu, Haishan and Noreen Goldman. "The Association Between Health-Related Behaviours and the Risk of Divorce in the USA." Journal of Biosocial Science 32,1 (January 2000): 63-88.
3. Neiss, Michelle
Rowe, David C.
Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Does Education Mediate the Relationship Between IQ and Age of First Birth? A Behavioural Genetic Analysis
Journal of Biosocial Science 34,2 (April 2002): 259-275.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayIssue?decade=2000&jid=JBS&volumeId=34&issueId=02&iid=99800
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Behavior; Childhood Residence; Education; Genetics; I.Q.; Intelligence; Kinship; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study presents a multivariate behavioural genetic analysis of the relationship between education, intelligence and age of first birth. Analyses investigated the mediational role of education in explaining the relationship between intelligence and age of first birth at both the phenotypic and behavioural genetic level. The data come from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), a nationally representative survey that included genetically informative full- and half-sibling pairs (n = 1423 pairs). Respondents were aged 14 to 22 when contacted in 1979. Heritability estimates were 0.32, 0.50 and 0.06 for IQ, education and age of first birth, respectively. Shared environment estimates were 0.35, 0.23 and 0.20 respectively. Common genetic and shared environmental factors were substantial in explaining the relationship between intelligence and education, and also education and age of first birth. Education partially mediated the relationship between intelligence and age of first birth only in the phenotypic analyses. After considering the genetic and shared environmental factors that influence all three variables, evidence for mediation was less convincing. This pattern of results suggests that the apparent mediational role of education at the phenotypic level is in fact the result of underlying genetic and shared environmental influences that affect education, IQ and age of first birth in common.
Bibliography Citation
Neiss, Michelle, David C. Rowe and Joseph Lee Rodgers. "Does Education Mediate the Relationship Between IQ and Age of First Birth? A Behavioural Genetic Analysis." Journal of Biosocial Science 34,2 (April 2002): 259-275.
4. Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Rowe, David C.
Buster, Maury Allen
Nature, Nurture and First Sexual Intercourse in the USA: Fitting Behavioural Genetic Models to NLSY Kinship Data
Journal of Biosocial Science 31,1 (January 1999): 29-41.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=1&fid=10230&jid=JBS&volumeId=31&issueId=01&aid=10229
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Intercourse; Genetics; Kinship; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Pairs (also see Siblings); Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Self-Esteem; Sexual Experiences/Virginity; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Fisher (1930) presented both theoretical and empirical results concerning genetic influences on fertility. Since then, only sparse research has been done on the genetics of fertility, although more sophisticated methodogy and data now exist than were available to Fisher. This paper presents a behavioural genetic analysis of age at first intercourse, accounting for genetic, shared environmental, and selected non-shared environmental influences. The data came from the nationally representative National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). A newly developed kinship linking procedure was used that identifies links for cousins, half-siblings, full-siblings and twins in the NLSY. The results suggest a genetic influence in the overall dataset, and also among whites and in male–male and opposite-sex pairs. Genetic influences were extremely small or non-existent for blacks and for female–female pairs. Shared environmental influences were small for most subsets of the data, but moderate for female–female pairs. Two specific non-shared environmental influences – self-esteem and locus of control – were ruled out as accounting for any meaningful variance, although other general sources of non[hyphen]shared environmental influence appear potentially important. Analysis of selected samples from upper and lower tails suggested that genetic influences are important in accounting for both early and late non-virginity. These findings are consistent with work reported by Miller et al. (1999), who used molecular genetic methods. Generally, these findings support the existence of genetic influences and implicate non-shared environmental influences as being important determinants of the timing of loss of virginity among US adolescents and young adults.
Bibliography Citation
Rodgers, Joseph Lee, David C. Rowe and Maury Allen Buster. "Nature, Nurture and First Sexual Intercourse in the USA: Fitting Behavioural Genetic Models to NLSY Kinship Data ." Journal of Biosocial Science 31,1 (January 1999): 29-41.
5. Rowe, David C.
Rodgers, Joseph Lee
An 'Epidemic' Model of Adolescent Sexual Intercourse: Applications to National Survey Data
Journal of Biosocial Science 23,2 (1991): 211-219.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=1637492&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0021932000019222
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Hispanics; Modeling; Sexual Activity; Sexual Experiences/Virginity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper applies models of the onset of adolescent sexual intercourse using nation data from Denmark and the USA. The model gave excellent fits to data on Danish Whites and a good fit to American Whites, but the model-fits for American Blacks and Hispanics were not as good. The weakness of the latter model fits may reflect either real processes that the model does not capture or problems in the reliability of adolescent sexuality data.
Bibliography Citation
Rowe, David C. and Joseph Lee Rodgers. "An 'Epidemic' Model of Adolescent Sexual Intercourse: Applications to National Survey Data." Journal of Biosocial Science 23,2 (1991): 211-219.