Search Results

Source: Journal of Adolescent Health
Resulting in 19 citations.
1. Bruine de Bruin, Wändi
Parker, Andrew M.
Fischhoff, Baruch
Can Adolescents Predict Significant Life Events?
Journal of Adolescent Health 41,2 (August 2007): 208–210.
Also: http://www.jahonline.org/article/S1054-139X%2807%2900181-4/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Probability judgments (also see Risk Perception); Risk Perception

We examine whether adolescents' probability judgments for significant life events are predictive and accurate. We find significant correlations with actual experiences, reported on successive waves of a national survey. Mean probability judgments approximated observed outcome rates, or were optimistic, except that adolescents greatly overestimated their probability of dying prematurely. © 2007 Society for Adolescent Medicine. All rights reserved.
Bibliography Citation
Bruine de Bruin, Wändi, Andrew M. Parker and Baruch Fischhoff. "Can Adolescents Predict Significant Life Events?" Journal of Adolescent Health 41,2 (August 2007): 208–210. A.
2. Champaloux, Steven William
Young, Deborah R.
Childhood Chronic Health Conditions and Educational Attainment: A Social Ecological Approach
Journal of Adolescent Health 56,1 (January 2015): 98-105.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X14003115
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Asthma; Childhood; Depression (see also CESD); Educational Attainment; GED/General Educational Diploma/General Equivalency Degree/General Educational Development; Health, Chronic Conditions; High School Diploma; Neighborhood Effects; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety

Purpose: This study examined the association between types of chronic health conditions reported during childhood and adolescence and their impact on educational attainment. School and neighborhood environments and potential mediating factors from academic and psychosocial variables were investigated.

Methods: Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth--Cohort 1997, multivariate logistic regression models were fit to estimate the association between chronic health conditions and educational attainment, adjusting for confounders. Chronic health conditions were defined as a parental (1997) or participant (2002) report of a chronic health condition and classified into (1) asthma; (2) cancer, diabetes, and epilepsy; (3) heart conditions; and (4) other. Educational attainment was defined as receiving a high school diploma or Graduate Equivalency Degree by age 21, determined from self-report.

Results: Youth who reported having a chronic health condition had higher odds of low educational attainment compared with youth who did not report a condition (n = 6,795; odds ratio [OR], 1.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22-1.76). Specifically, youth with asthma (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.31-2.02) and those with cancer, diabetes, or epilepsy (OR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.13-3.37) had higher odds of low attainment. For youth who reported cancer, diabetes, or epilepsy, the variables "school absences," "repeated a grade," and "depressive symptoms" attenuated the association and were considered mediators.

Conclusions: Youth with chronic health conditions had lower educational attainment. Students with cancer, diabetes, or epilepsy who had a high number of absences, had repeated a grade, or had a high-depressive symptoms score were particularly impacted.

Bibliography Citation
Champaloux, Steven William and Deborah R. Young. "Childhood Chronic Health Conditions and Educational Attainment: A Social Ecological Approach." Journal of Adolescent Health 56,1 (January 2015): 98-105.
3. Coley, Rebekah Levine
Medeiros, Bethany L.
Schindler, Holly S.
Using Sibling Differences to Estimate Effects of Parenting on Adolescent Sexual Risk Behaviors
Journal of Adolescent Health 43,2 (August 2008):133-140.
Also: http://www.jahonline.org/article/S1054-139X%2808%2900101-8/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Heterogeneity; Modeling, Multilevel; Parenting Skills/Styles; Risk-Taking; Sexual Behavior

Purpose
To estimate effects of positive and involved parenting during mid-adolescence on sexual risk behaviors (frequency of intercourse, unprotected intercourse, and number of sexual partners) during late adolescence. Substantial literature suggests that supportive family contexts and parenting behaviors may discourage adolescents from engaging in early and risky sexual activities; yet methodological limitations hamper the conclusions regarding causality and directionality that can be drawn from much existing research. To address such limitations, the current study used a variety of increasingly conservative statistical modeling techniques to help control for unobserved heterogeneity and potential bias and hence to progress toward identifying causal relationships.

Methods
Drawing from a nationally representative longitudinal survey of adolescents (NLSY97; N = 4980), this study used ordinary least squares (OLS) regression models, lagged regression models, and family fixed-effects models to assess whether parental knowledge, parent negativity, and family activities during midadolescence predicted differences in late adolescent sexual risk behaviors.

Results
Even after controlling for unobserved heterogeneity across individuals and across families, parenting processes significantly predicted later adolescent sexual risk behaviors. Specifically, more regular family activities and less negative and hostile parenting during mid-adolescence predicted lower sexual risk behaviors during late adolescence.

Conclusions
Results concerning the buffering effects of parenting on adolescent risk behaviors help to inform prevention and intervention efforts. Through the use of more rigorous statistical methodology and large representative samples of youth, this research provides an exemplar of how survey research can seek to move closer to understanding causal processes in the exceedingly complex systems of human development.

Bibliography Citation
Coley, Rebekah Levine, Bethany L. Medeiros and Holly S. Schindler. "Using Sibling Differences to Estimate Effects of Parenting on Adolescent Sexual Risk Behaviors." Journal of Adolescent Health 43,2 (August 2008):133-140.
4. Donahue, Kelly L.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Rodgers, Joseph Lee
D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Psychosocial Predictors of Adolescent Sexual Risk Behavior: A Quasi-Experimental Analysis in a Nationally Representative Sample of American Youths
Journal of Adolescent Health 54,2 (February 2014): S15-S16.
Also: http://www.jahonline.org/article/S1054-139X%2813%2900581-8/fulltext
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Age at First Intercourse; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); CESD (Depression Scale); Dating; Depression (see also CESD); Genetics; Kinship; Sexual Activity; Siblings

Participants were drawn from the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, a longitudinal, nationally representative, and genetically informative sample in the United States (N = 7,743). Using a sibling comparison approach, we tested whether associations between measures of childhood psychosocial adjustment (i.e., early dating, substance use, and emotional and behavioral problems) and adolescent sexual risk behavior (i.e., early age at first intercourse and number of past-year sexual partners) remained after controlling for confounds shared by full siblings and maternal half siblings who differed in their exposure to each risk factor. Next, using quantitative genetic modeling, we also estimated the extent to which these associations were attributable to shared genetic, shared environmental, or nonshared environmental influences.
Bibliography Citation
Donahue, Kelly L., Carol A. Van Hulle, Joseph Lee Rodgers and Brian M. D'Onofrio. "Psychosocial Predictors of Adolescent Sexual Risk Behavior: A Quasi-Experimental Analysis in a Nationally Representative Sample of American Youths." Journal of Adolescent Health 54,2 (February 2014): S15-S16.
5. Dong, Beidi
Jacoby, Sara F.
Morrison, Christopher N.
Wiebe, Douglas J.
Longitudinal Heterogeneity in Handgun-Carrying Behavior Among Urban American Youth: Intervention Priorities at Different Life Stages
Journal of Adolescent Health published online (16 November 2018): DOI: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2018.09.026.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X18304415
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Handguns, carrying or using; Transition, Adulthood; Urbanization/Urban Living

Purpose: To determine longitudinal patterns of handgun-carrying behavior among urban American youth and identify modifiable risk factors associated with distinct carrying patterns that should be targeted at different life stages.

Methods: Using panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, we estimated longitudinal trajectories of handgun carrying among urban Americans, who carried a handgun at least once between 1997 and 2011 (N = 1,574). Multinomial logistic regression analyses examined risk factors associated with handgun-carrying trajectory groups during late adolescence (ages 16-20), emerging adulthood (ages 20-24), and young established adulthood (ages 24-28).

Bibliography Citation
Dong, Beidi, Sara F. Jacoby, Christopher N. Morrison and Douglas J. Wiebe. "Longitudinal Heterogeneity in Handgun-Carrying Behavior Among Urban American Youth: Intervention Priorities at Different Life Stages." Journal of Adolescent Health published online (16 November 2018): DOI: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2018.09.026.
6. Doran, Kelly A.
Waldron, Mary
Timing of First Alcohol Use and First Sex in Male and Female Adolescents
Journal of Adolescent Health 61,5 (November 2017): 606-611.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X17302185
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Age at First Intercourse; Alcohol Use; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration

Purpose: We examined associations between timing of first alcohol use and first sexual intercourse in adolescent males and potential differences in observed associations between males and females.

Methods: Data were drawn from 4,079 male and 4,059 female participants of the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997, aged 12-16 years at the first assessment. Cox proportional hazards regression models were estimated predicting age at first sexual intercourse from age at first alcohol use, without and with adjustment for correlated sociodemographic and individual- and family-level risk factors. Analyses were conducted separately for males and females, with interactions between alcohol use and respondent sex (female vs. male) modeled in subsidiary analyses.

Results: Onset of first drink was strongly predictive of earlier sexual intercourse for both males and females, with effects of drinking most pronounced for females during early adolescence.

Bibliography Citation
Doran, Kelly A. and Mary Waldron. "Timing of First Alcohol Use and First Sex in Male and Female Adolescents." Journal of Adolescent Health 61,5 (November 2017): 606-611.
7. Fischhoff, Baruch
Bruine de Bruin, Wändi
Parker, Andrew M.
Millstein, Susan G.
Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie L.
Adolescents' Perceived Risk of Dying
Journal of Adolescent Health 46,3 (March 2010): 265-269.
Also: http://www.jahonline.org/article/S1054-139X%2809%2900263-8/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Mortality; Neighborhood Effects; Probability judgments (also see Risk Perception); Risk Perception; Risk-Taking

Purpose: Although adolescents' expectations are accurate or moderately optimistic for many significant life events, they greatly overestimate their chances of dying soon. We examine here whether adolescents' mortality judgments are correlated with their perceptions of direct threats to their survival. Such sensitivity would indicate the importance of ensuring that adolescents have accurate information about those threats, as well as the psychological support needed to deal with them.

Methods: Data from two separate studies were used: a national sample of 3,436 14–18-year-old adolescents and a regional sample of 124 seventh graders and 132 ninth graders, 12–16 years old. Participants were asked about their chance of dying in the next year and before age 20, and about the extent of various threats to their physical well-being.

Results: Adolescents in both samples greatly overestimated their chance of dying. Those mortality estimates were higher for adolescents who reported direct threats (e.g., an unsafe neighborhood). Thus, adolescents were sensitive to the relative size of threats to their survival, but not to the implications for absolute risk levels.

Conclusions: Contrary to the folk wisdom that adolescents have a unique sense of invulnerability, the individuals studied here reported an exaggerated sense of mortality, which was highest among those reporting greater threats in their lives. Such fears could affect adolescents' short-term well-being and future planning. Copyright 2009 Society for Adolescent Medicine. All rights reserved.

Bibliography Citation
Fischhoff, Baruch, Wändi Bruine de Bruin, Andrew M. Parker, Susan G. Millstein and Bonnie L. Halpern-Felsher. "Adolescents' Perceived Risk of Dying." Journal of Adolescent Health 46,3 (March 2010): 265-269.
8. Griesler, Pamela C.
Kandel, Denise B.
Ethnic Differences in Correlates of Adolescent Cigarette Smoking
Journal of Adolescent Health 23,3 (September 1998):167-180.
Also: http://www.jahonline.org/article/S1054-139X%2898%2900029-9/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Deviance; Ethnic Differences; Family Characteristics; Hispanics; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Religious Influences; Role Models; Self-Esteem; Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC); Social Environment; Substance Use

PURPOSE: To examine the correlates of cigarette smoking among African-American, Hispanic, and white adolescents in a cross-sectional national sample. METHODS: A total of 1795 mother-child dyads from the 1992 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were selected for analyses. Measures of adolescents cigarette smoking and family, individual, peer, and sociodemographic risk factors were analyzed. RESULTS: White youths reported the highest rates of lifetime, current, and persistent smoking, and initiated smoking at a significantly earlier age than African-Americans and Hispanics. Except for maternal cigarette smoking and substance use, African-Americans and Hispanics experienced a disproportionately larger number of purported risk factors than whites. Multivariate analyses revealed common and ethnic-specific correlates of adolescent lifetime and current smoking, with many more significant associations among whites than minorities. Common correlates included youth's age across all three ethnic groups, problem behaviors and delinquency among whites and African-Americans, and perceived peer pressure to smoke among whites and Hispanics. Ethnic-specific correlates included maternal smoking, maternal cocaine use, low maternal religiosity, and negative scholastic attitudes, which increased smoking for whites; and positive parenting, which reduced smoking for African-Americans. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of effects of maternal smoking and perceived peer pressure to smoke on African-American adolescents compared with whites suggests that role modeling and interpersonal influence may be more important determinants of smoking for white than African-American adolescents. The differential impact of family and peer factors on the smoking of adolescents of different ethnicity warrants further investigation.
Bibliography Citation
Griesler, Pamela C. and Denise B. Kandel. "Ethnic Differences in Correlates of Adolescent Cigarette Smoking." Journal of Adolescent Health 23,3 (September 1998):167-180.
9. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Park, M. Jane
Ling, Thomson J.
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Risky Behaviors in Late Adolescence: Co-Occurrence, Predictors, and Consequences
Journal of Adolescent Health 45,3 (September 2009): 253-261.
Also: http://www.jahonline.org/article/S1054-139X%2809%2900111-6/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Adolescent Sexual Activity; Behavioral Problems; Family Characteristics; Family Environment; Risk-Taking; Well-Being

PURPOSE: Advances in research have broadened our understanding of the risky behaviors that significantly threaten adolescent health and well-being. Advances include: using person-centered, rather than behavior-centered approaches to examine how behaviors co-occur; greater focus on how environmental factors, such as family, or peer-level characteristics, influence behavior; and examination of how behaviors affect well-being in young adulthood. Use of nationally representative, longitudinal data would expand research on these critical relationships. METHODS: Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 cohort, a nationally representative sample of adolescents who are being followed over time, the present study: (1) identifies profiles of risky behaviors, (2) investigates how environmental characteristics predict these profiles of risky behaviors (e.g., delinquency, smoking, drug use, drinking, sexual behavior, and exercise), and (3) examines how these profiles of risky behaviors relate to positive and negative youth outcomes. RESULTS: Four "risk profiles" were identified: a high-risk group (those who report high levels of participation in numerous behaviors), a low-risk group (those who engage in very few risky behaviors), and two moderate risk-taking groups. We found that profiles with any negative behaviors were predictive of negative outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: It is important for practitioners to examine health behaviors in multiple domains concurrently rather than individually in isolation. Interventions and research should not simply target adolescents engaging in high levels of risky behavior but also adolescents who are engaging in lower levels of risky behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine, M. Jane Park, Thomson J. Ling and Kristin Anderson Moore. "Risky Behaviors in Late Adolescence: Co-Occurrence, Predictors, and Consequences." Journal of Adolescent Health 45,3 (September 2009): 253-261.
10. Lee, Hedwig
Lee, Dohoon
Guo, Guang
Harris, Kathleen Mullan
Trends in Body Mass Index in Adolescence and Young Adulthood in the United States: 1959–2002
Journal of Adolescent Health 49,6 (December 2011): 601-608.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X11001522
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Gender Differences; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES); National Health Interview Survey (NHIS); National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth); Racial Differences; Weight

Purpose: This study examined trends in body mass index (BMI) during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood by gender and race, using national data from the United States spanning for >40 years from 1959 and 2002. Although past research has investigated BMI trends separately in childhood/adolescence and adulthood, this study uniquely focused on the transition to adulthood (12–26 years) to identify the emergence of the obesity epidemic during this critical life-stage.

Methods: Longitudinal and cross-sectional data were obtained from four nationally representative surveys: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, National Health Interview Survey, and National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth (NLSY79 and NLSY97). The analysis tracked age trends in BMI by time, which allowed for the examination of how BMI changed during the transition to adulthood and whether the patterns of change varied by period. Data best suited for trend analysis were identified. Age trends in BMI by gender and race were graphed and regression analysis was used to test for significant differences in the trends using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.

Results: BMI increased sharply in the adolescent ages, beginning in the 1990s and among young adults around 2000. This age pattern of BMI increase was more dramatic among females and blacks, particularly black females.

Conclusions: BMI increased during the transition to adulthood and these increases have grown larger over time. Obesity prevention efforts should focus on this high-risk transition period, particularly among minority populations.

Bibliography Citation
Lee, Hedwig, Dohoon Lee, Guang Guo and Kathleen Mullan Harris. "Trends in Body Mass Index in Adolescence and Young Adulthood in the United States: 1959–2002." Journal of Adolescent Health 49,6 (December 2011): 601-608.
11. Leech, Tamara G. J.
Everything's Better in Moderation: Young Women's Gender Role Attitudes and Risky Sexual Behavior.
Journal of Adolescent Health 46,5 (May 2010): 437-443.
Also: http://www.jahonline.org/article/S1054-139X%2809%2900601-6/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Gender Attitudes/Roles; Propensity Scores; Risk-Taking; Sex Roles; Sexual Behavior

PURPOSE: This study examines the association between gender role attitudes and risky sexual behavior among young women. Previous studies have posed seemingly contradictory arguments: that either traditional attitudes or egalitarian attitudes are associated with riskier behavior. METHODS: Data are based on the children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, representing 520 sexually active 18-19-year-old women. Propensity radius matching was used to assess differences in rates of multiple sexual partners and sex outside of a committed relationship. RESULTS: Relative to moderate gender role attitudes, both egalitarian gender role attitudes and traditional gender role attitudes are associated with higher rates of risky sexual behavior. Both women with egalitarian role attitudes and those with traditional role attitudes have about a 10% higher prevalence of risky behavior compared to women with more moderate gender role attitudes. CONCLUSION: Existing, seemingly contradictory contentions about the relationship between gender role attitudes and risky sexual behavior may be more coherent than they seem. By shifting focus from risk to protection, the results suggest that moderate gender role attitudes are protective against risky sexual behavior. Future studies should investigate the causal mechanisms and intervention implications of this protective relationship. Copyright 2010 Society for Adolescent Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Bibliography Citation
Leech, Tamara G. J. "Everything's Better in Moderation: Young Women's Gender Role Attitudes and Risky Sexual Behavior." Journal of Adolescent Health 46,5 (May 2010): 437-443.
12. Manlove, Jennifer S.
Terry-Humen, Elizabeth
Ikramullah, Erum N.
The Role of Parent Religiosity in Teens' Transitions to Sex and Contraception
Journal of Adolescent Health 39,4 (October 2006): 578-587.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X06001029
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Contraception; Family Environment; Family Models; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Religious Influences; Sexual Behavior

Purpose: To examine whether multiple dimensions of parent and family religiosity--including parental religious attendance, denomination, beliefs, and family religious activities--are associated with the timing of sexual initiation or contraceptive use at first sex. Methods: We analyze a sample of sexually inexperienced adolescents aged 12-14 years in the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97) to test the association between multiple dimensions of parent and family religiosity and the transition to first sexual experience and contraceptive use at first sex during the teen years. We assess the association between parent and family religiosity and the timing of adolescent sexual experience using multivariate event history models, and examine contraceptive use outcomes using logistic regressions. All analyses are conducted separately by gender and race/ethnicity. Results: More frequent parental religious attendance is associated with a delayed timing of first sex among all sub-populations except among black adolescents. Engaging in family religious activities on a daily basis is associated with delayed sexual initiation among male, female, and white teens. Results for contraceptive use differ, however. Only strong parental religious beliefs and more frequent participation in family religious activities are associated with contraceptive use at first sex, in a negative direction, among males. Conclusion: More frequent parental religious attendance and family religious activities are related to later timing of sexual initiation, highlighting an important dimension of family environments that can help improve reproductive health outcomes for children. However, stronger family religiosity does not translate into improved contraceptive use. (PsycINFO Database Record © 2006 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Manlove, Jennifer S., Elizabeth Terry-Humen and Erum N. Ikramullah. "The Role of Parent Religiosity in Teens' Transitions to Sex and Contraception ." Journal of Adolescent Health 39,4 (October 2006): 578-587.
13. McDonald, Jill A.
Manlove, Jennifer S.
Ikramullah, Erum N.
Immigration Measures and Reproductive Health Among Hispanic Youth: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997-2003
Journal of Adolescent Health 44,1 (January 2009): 14-24.
Also: http://www.jahonline.org/article/S1054-139X%2808%2900341-8/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Contraception; Hispanic Youth; Immigrants; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Sexual Activity

PURPOSE: To explore relationships between immigration measures and risk of reproductive and sexual events among U.S. Hispanic adolescents.
METHODS: We examined generation status, language in the home and country of origin in relation to sexual activity, contraception, and childbearing among 1614 Hispanic adolescents, using nationally representative 1997-2003 longitudinal data. Multivariable analyses controlled for potentially confounding variables. Tests for effect modification by gender and Mexican origin were conducted.
RESULTS: Fewer first generation adolescents transitioned to sexual intercourse before age 18 (odds ratio [OR]=.80, 95% confidence interval [CI]=.66-.98) and fewer first and second generation sexually active teens used contraceptives consistently at age 17 (OR=.32, 95% CI=.17-.60 and OR=.50, 95% CI=.31-.80, respectively) than third-generation teens. Language was similarly associated with the transition to sexual intercourse and contraceptive practices. Versus teens of Mexican origin, teens of Puerto Rican origin and origins other than Cuba and Central/South America had greater odds of becoming sexually active; youth of all origins except Central/South America had fewer multiple live births (OR=.14-.31). Gender modified the effects of generation on consistent use of contraceptives and condoms at age 17. Gender also modified the effect of country of origin on transitioning to sexual intercourse before age 18 years.
CONCLUSIONS: Results expand on previous observations that generation, language, and country of origin are predictors of reproductive and sexual risks for Hispanic adolescents. These immigration measures may therefore be useful in targeting community and clinical preventive services.
Bibliography Citation
McDonald, Jill A., Jennifer S. Manlove and Erum N. Ikramullah. "Immigration Measures and Reproductive Health Among Hispanic Youth: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997-2003." Journal of Adolescent Health 44,1 (January 2009): 14-24.
14. Pyrooz, David Cyrus
Sweeten, Gary
Gang Membership Between Ages 5 and 17 Years in the United States
Journal of Adolescent Health 56,4 (April 2015): 414-419.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X14007563
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Delinquency/Gang Activity

Purpose: This study determined the frequency, prevalence, and turnover in gang membership between ages 5 and 17 years in the United States.

Methods: Data were from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, which is representative of youth born between 1980 and 1984. Age-specific patterns of gang joining, participation, and leaving are estimated based on youths (N=7,335) self-reported gang membership at the baseline and eight subsequent interviews, which were combined with population age estimates from the 2010 U.S. Census to produce national estimates of gang membership. Sampling variance-adjusted bounds were estimated based on assumptions about missing cases and survey design effects. Demographic and socioeconomic variables are used to compare differences between gang and nongang youth.

Results: Youth gang members were disproportionately male, black, Hispanic, from single-parent households, and families living below the poverty level. We estimated that there were 1,059,000 youth gang members in the United States in 2010 (bounds ranging from 675,000 to 1,535,000). The prevalence of youth gang membership was 2.0% (1.2%-2.8%), peaking at age 14 years at 5.0% (3.9%-6.0%). Annually, 401,000 (204,000-639,000) juveniles join gangs and 378,000 (199,000-599,000) exit gangs, with a turnover rate of 36%.

Conclusions: We discovered that significantly more people are involved with gangs than previous estimates would suggest. Clinicians and policy makers must recognize that youth gang members may not conform to popular perceptions of gang demographics. The patterns of youth gang membership observed in this study support prevention programs aimed at children before the teen years. This strategy is more likely to succeed than gang intervention or suppression strategies aimed at teens.

Bibliography Citation
Pyrooz, David Cyrus and Gary Sweeten. "Gang Membership Between Ages 5 and 17 Years in the United States." Journal of Adolescent Health 56,4 (April 2015): 414-419.
15. Shandra, Carrie L.
Shameem, Masra
Ghori, Sadaf J.
Disability and the Context of Boys' First Sexual Intercourse
Journal of Adolescent Health 58,3 (March 2016): 302-309.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X15004085
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Contraception; Disability; Health, Chronic Conditions; Male Sample; Sexual Experiences/Virginity

The context in which first sexual intercourse takes place has lasting implications for subsequent sexual behavior. This study examines how adolescent disability associates with boys' age of sexual debut, relationship at first sexual intercourse, degree of discussion about birth control before first sexual intercourse, and contraceptive use at first sexual intercourse.
Bibliography Citation
Shandra, Carrie L., Masra Shameem and Sadaf J. Ghori. "Disability and the Context of Boys' First Sexual Intercourse." Journal of Adolescent Health 58,3 (March 2016): 302-309.
16. Strobino, Donna M.
Ensminger, Margaret E.
Nanda, Joy
Kim, Young J.
Young Motherhood and Infant Hospitalization During the First Year of Life
Journal of Adolescent Health 13,7 (November 1992): 553-560.
Also: http://www.jahonline.org/article/1054-139X%2892%2990368-L/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Birth Order; Birthweight; Child Health; Children, Well-Being; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Family Characteristics; Fertility; First Birth; Household Composition; Mothers, Adolescent; Mothers, Education; Poverty; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care

We studied the relationship of young maternal age with infant hospitalization using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for 3,130 infants born between 1979 and 1983 to mothers aged 14-25 years. Data on the mothers were first collected in 1979 and yearly thereafter. Data on their children were collected starting in 1982. Logistic regressions of infant hospitalization rates were estimated for first and second and higher births. The odds of infant hospitalization during the first year of life increased with decreasing maternal age, even with adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics, preventive health-care practices, and newborn health status, factors hypothesized to explain the maternal age effect. The maternal age relationship with hospitalization differed by birth order; among second and higher births, the odds of hospitalization was increased only for infants of mothers aged 20-22 years. Male infants, infants with a first wellbaby visit after the first month of life, with birth weights between 1501 and 2500 g, and with nursery stays longer than one week also had increased odds of hospitalization. Ethnicity, grandmother's education, poverty status, mother's school enrollment, and family composition were not related to the odds of hospitalization, nor was smoking during pregnancy when adjustment was made for birth weight and length of nursery stay.
Bibliography Citation
Strobino, Donna M., Margaret E. Ensminger, Joy Nanda and Young J. Kim. "Young Motherhood and Infant Hospitalization During the First Year of Life." Journal of Adolescent Health 13,7 (November 1992): 553-560.
17. Thakkar, Madhuli Y.
Hao, Lingxin
Marcell, Arik
Adolescents' and Young Adults' Routine Care Use: The Role of Their Mothers' Care Use Behaviors
Journal of Adolescent Health published online (9 October 2018): DOI: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2018.07.009.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X18302982
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent health; Health Care; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mothers, Health; Parental Influences

Purpose: Little is known whether mothers' own care use is differentially associated with their adolescents' routine care use by gender. The main purpose of this study is to examine whether mothers' healthcare use prospectively predicts their adolescents' routine care use stratified by gender, after controlling for predisposing (child's age, race/ethnicity, region of residence, urbanicity, and mother's age at child's birth), enabling (mother's education, adolescent and mother health insurance), and need (child health status) factors.

Methods: In 2018, a prospective analysis was conducted using data from 5,040 adolescents aged 9-24 and their mothers who completed the two-generation National Longitudinal Survey of Youth in 2006 (first interview) and 2008 (second interview). Findings include percentages and adjusted odds ratios of the factors that predict adolescents' self-report of routine care use in the past year measured at the second interview.

Results: In 2008, over half of participants reported a routine doctor visit during the prior 12 months and this varied by gender; more females (68.7%) had a visit than males (53.5%). Factors that independently predicted a greater odds of adolescents' routine doctor visits included mothers with routine doctor visits at both interviews or the second interview only, and adolescents' health insurance and past routine visit, regardless of gender. Males aged 18-20 and 21-24 years had lower odds of having a routine doctor visit than males aged 9-11 years.

Bibliography Citation
Thakkar, Madhuli Y., Lingxin Hao and Arik Marcell. "Adolescents' and Young Adults' Routine Care Use: The Role of Their Mothers' Care Use Behaviors." Journal of Adolescent Health published online (9 October 2018): DOI: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2018.07.009.
18. Unger, Donald G.
Cooley, Marcia L.
Partner and Grandmother Contact in Black and White Teen Parent Families
Journal of Adolescent Health 13,7 (November 1992): 546-552.
Also: http://www.jahonline.org/article/1054-139X%2892%2990367-K/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Care; Child Development; Fathers, Absence; General Assessment; Grandmothers; Home Environment; Household Composition; Mothers, Adolescent; Mothers, Education; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Racial Differences; Teenagers

Studied contact of 338 teen mothers (aged 14-29 yrs) with grandmothers and partners as a predictor of maternal and middle childhood developmental outcomes. Each child (aged 6-7.9 yrs) was given a developmental assessment. Black teens lived longer with their parents after the child's birth, while White teens married earlier and had more disruptions in their relationships. Grandmother assistance with childcare was positively associated with the mother's ability to pursue her education. Findings suggest that child developmental problems may occur when mothers routinely rely on grandmother assistance into middle childhood, particularly for White families. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Unger, Donald G. and Marcia L. Cooley. "Partner and Grandmother Contact in Black and White Teen Parent Families." Journal of Adolescent Health 13,7 (November 1992): 546-552.
19. Zhang, Ning
Zhang, Qi
Does Early School Entry Prevent Obesity Among Adolescent Girls?
Journal of Adolescent Health 48,6 (June 2011): 644-646.
Also: http://www.jahonline.org/article/S1054-139X%2810%2900478-7/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Gender Differences; Height; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Physical Activity (see also Exercise); School Entry/Readiness; Self-Reporting; Weight

Purpose: To examine the relationship between early school entry and body weight status among adolescent girls.

Methods: Using nationally representative data from the 1997 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we exploited state-specific first-grade entrance policy as a quasi-experimental research design to examine the effect of early school entry on the body weight status of adolescent girls. Fixed-effects models were used to compare the body mass index (BMI), BMI z-score, and likelihood of overweight and obesity between teenage girls born before school cut-off dates and those born after, while controlling for age, race/ethnicity, maternal education status, and maternal body weight status

Results: Late starters had higher BMIs and a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity and the results were found to be consistent across age groups. Among girls whose birthdays were within 1 month of the cut-off dates, the coefficient of late starting was significantly positive (Beta=.311; p=.02), indicating that it might be correlated with weight gain in adolescence.

Conclusions: Early admission to a school environment might have a long-term protective effect in terms of adolescent girls’ propensity to obesity. Future studies are needed to examine the effect of early school entry on the eating behavior and physical activities of adolescent girls.

Bibliography Citation
Zhang, Ning and Qi Zhang. "Does Early School Entry Prevent Obesity Among Adolescent Girls?" Journal of Adolescent Health 48,6 (June 2011): 644-646.