Search Results

Source: Journal of Adolescence
Resulting in 10 citations.
1. Guo, Siying
A Model of Religious Involvement, Family Processes, Self-Control, and Juvenile Delinquency in Two-Parent Families
Journal of Adolescence 63 (February 2018): 175-190.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140197117302154
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Family Process Measures; Parental Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles; Religious Influences; Self-Control/Self-Regulation

Family processes, adolescent religious involvement, and self-control may serve as important mechanisms that mediate the relationship between parental religious involvement and delinquency. However, at present no study has systematically investigated the relationships among these factors and how these mediating mechanisms work. To address this gap, path analyses are conducted to test the hypothesized pathways whereby parental religious involvement operates to discourage delinquent behaviors of offspring. The study variables are taken from three waves of the study of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and its descendent NLSY79 Child and Young Adults at two year intervals (2000, 2002, and 2004). 1020 American adolescents who are 10-14 years old in 2002 are selected for final analyses. The findings suggest that parental religious involvement does not affect adolescent delinquency four years later directly, but indirectly through its influence on adolescent religious involvement, parenting practices, inter-parental conflict, and their interactions with adolescent self-control.
Bibliography Citation
Guo, Siying. "A Model of Religious Involvement, Family Processes, Self-Control, and Juvenile Delinquency in Two-Parent Families." Journal of Adolescence 63 (February 2018): 175-190.
2. Hardy, Sam A.
Raffaelli, Marcela
Adolescent Religiosity and Sexuality: An Investigation of Reciprocal Influences
Journal of Adolescence 26,6 (December 2003): 731-740.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140197103000782
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Hispanics; Racial Differences; Religious Influences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Experiences/Virginity; Teenagers

The present study examined potential bi-directional associations between religiosity and first sexual intercourse. The sample, drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, included 303 teens (22% Hispanic, 35% Black, 43% White; 53% male) aged 15-16 in 1996 and 17-18 in 1998. All teens included in the sample were virgins at Time 1. In the longitudinal analyses, higher Time 1 religiosity (a composite of importance of religion and frequency of church attendance) was associated with a lower likelihood of first sexual intercourse between Time 1 and Time 2. However, transition to sexual activity between Time 1 and Time 2 was not significantly related to Time 2 religiosity. Thus, results do not support a bi-directional association; instead, it appears that teens with higher levels of religiosity tend to delay sexual involvement more than those with lower levels of religiosity.... In 1986, children of female participants were added to the study, and have been assessed every 2 years thereafter. Since 1988, children 10 years and older have provided self-report data on religiosity, and those 13 years and older have reported on their sexual experience. The sample for the present study was drawn from the 635 teens aged 15-16 in 1996. These teens were selected because they were administered the relevant religiosity and sexuality questions in both 1996 (Time 1) and 1998 (Time 2).[Copyright 2003 Elsevier]
Bibliography Citation
Hardy, Sam A. and Marcela Raffaelli. "Adolescent Religiosity and Sexuality: An Investigation of Reciprocal Influences." Journal of Adolescence 26,6 (December 2003): 731-740.
3. Hockaday, Catheryn Michele
Crase, Sedahlia Jasper
Shelley, Mack C., II
Stockdale, Dahlia F.
A Prospective Study of Adolescent Pregnancy
Journal of Adolescence 23,4 (August 2000): 423-438.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140197100903294
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Adolescent Fertility; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Pregnancy, Adolescent; Racial Differences; Self-Esteem; Work Attitudes

This study examined prospectively the characteristics contributing to adolescent pregnancy in a pregnant (n=452) and comparison (n=373) group of adolescents. The participants were 15-19-year-old Black and White females in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The variables included race, self-esteem, age-related risks, delinquency history, aspirations and expectations. Using regression analyses, adolescent pregnancy in Blacks was predicted by approval of delaying a family and pursuing a career, aspirations of working, and lower educational expectations. Pregnancy in White adolescents was predicted by higher educational wishes, lower educational expectations, desiring more children, and having sex younger. Implications and recommendations are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Hockaday, Catheryn Michele, Sedahlia Jasper Crase, Mack C. Shelley and Dahlia F. Stockdale. "A Prospective Study of Adolescent Pregnancy." Journal of Adolescence 23,4 (August 2000): 423-438.
4. Hogan, Dennis P.
Shandra, Carrie L.
Msall, Michael E.
Family Developmental Risk Factors Among Adolescents With Disabilities and Children of Parents with Disabilities
Journal of Adolescence 30,6 (December 2007): 1001-1019.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140197107000127
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Disability; Family Influences; Family Studies; Gender; Home Environment; Household Structure; Learning Motivation; Parental Influences

This paper investigates how the learning environments and family dynamics differ if households have a child with a disability or a parent with a disability. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, results indicate that children with disabilities experience similar learning environments as other children, but have somewhat weaker relationships with their parents. In two-parent families, maternal disability lowers parents' school involvement and is associated with a less enriching home environment. Paternal disability reduces maternal monitoring and positive family activities possibly because mothers divert care-giving resources from their children to their male partners. Children in mother-headed households experience learning environments and family dynamics that are similar regardless of their own disability status or that of their mothers, but these outcomes are markedly inferior to those of children growing up in two-parent households. Future research on adolescent development should consider the disability status of children and parents, with particular attention to patterns of gendered care-giving in American families. [Copyright 2007 Elsevier]

Copyright of Journal of Adolescence is the property of Academic Press Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Hogan, Dennis P., Carrie L. Shandra and Michael E. Msall. "Family Developmental Risk Factors Among Adolescents With Disabilities and Children of Parents with Disabilities." Journal of Adolescence 30,6 (December 2007): 1001-1019.
5. Huang, David Y.C.
Lanza, H. Isabella
Wright-Volel, Kynna
Anglin, M. Douglas
Developmental Trajectories of Childhood Obesity and Risk Behaviors in Adolescence
Journal of Adolescence 36,1 (February 2013): 139-148.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23199644
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Body Mass Index (BMI); CESD (Depression Scale); Child Health; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Dating; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Drug Use; Obesity; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Risk-Taking; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Sexual Behavior; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Substance Use

Using group-based trajectory modeling, this study examined 5156 adolescents from the child sample of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to identify developmental trajectories of obesity from ages 6-18 and evaluate associations of such trajectories with risk behaviors and psychosocial health in adolescence. Four distinctive obesity trajectories were identified: "Chronically Obese," "Decreasing," "Increasing," and "Non-obese." Males were overrepresented in the Chronically Obese and Increasing groups; females were overrepresented in the Decreasing group. African-Americans were overrepresented in the Chronically Obese, Increasing, and Decreasing groups; in contrast, Whites were overrepresented in the Non-obese group. Obesity trajectories were not associated with greater trends in alcohol use, marijuana use, or delinquency, but Chronically Obese adolescents showed a greater increase in cigarette smoking over time compared to other trajectories. The Increasing trajectory, representing a transition into obesity status from childhood to adolescence, was associated with poorer psychosocial health compared to other trajectories.
Bibliography Citation
Huang, David Y.C., H. Isabella Lanza, Kynna Wright-Volel and M. Douglas Anglin. "Developmental Trajectories of Childhood Obesity and Risk Behaviors in Adolescence." Journal of Adolescence 36,1 (February 2013): 139-148.
6. Prause, JoAnn
Dooley, David
Effect of Underemployment on School-Leavers' Self-Esteem
Journal of Adolescence 20,3 (June 1997): 243-260.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S014019719790083X
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Aptitude; Employment; Employment, Part-Time; Ethnic Groups; Gender Differences; High School Completion/Graduates; Poverty; School Dropouts; Self-Esteem; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Underemployment; Unemployment

Explores whether self esteem (SE) is adversely affected by economic underemployment as defined by unemployment, involuntary part-time employment, intermittent unemployment, and poverty income in a group of 3066 recent school leavers. Ss were part of the ongoing 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, designed to represent the population of individuals born between 1957 and 1964 in the US. Ss were interviewed in 1980, were in high school during that year, and were, at that time, less than 20 yrs. of age. All were reinterviewed in 1987. Results indicate that SE was significantly lower in each of the economically underemployed groups relative to the adequately employed after controlling for early SE, SES, gender, ethnicity, aptitude, age, and education. There were no differences in SE among the economically underemployed groups after adjusting for the control variables. Economic underemployment proved to be a distinct concept relative to self reported job satisfaction. Underemployment was negatively related to SE after controlling for perceived job satisfaction and the other control variables. (PsycINFO Database Copyright 1998 American Psychological Assn., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Prause, JoAnn and David Dooley. "Effect of Underemployment on School-Leavers' Self-Esteem." Journal of Adolescence 20,3 (June 1997): 243-260.
7. Sen, Bisakha
The Relationship Between Frequency of Family Dinner and Adolescent Problem Behaviors After Adjusting for Other Family Characteristics
Journal of Adolescence 33,1 (February 2010): 187-196.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140197109000372
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavioral Problems; Family Characteristics; Family Studies; Gender Differences; Modeling, Logit; Runaways; Substance Use

OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between frequency of family dinners (FFD) and selected problem behaviors for adolescents after adjusting for family connectedness, parental awareness, other family activities, and other potentially confounding factors. METHODS: Data are drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997. The primary variable of interest is self-reported FFD in a typical week. Problem behaviors studied are substance-use, physical violence, property-destruction, stealing, running away from home, and gang membership. Multivariate logistic models are estimated for each behaviors. Linear regression models are estimated for behavior-frequency for the sub-samples engaging in them. Analysis is done separately by gender. RESULTS: FFD is negatively associated with substance-use and running away for females; drinking, physical violence, property-destruction, stealing and running away for males. CONCLUSION: Family meals are negatively associated to certain problem behaviors for adolescents even after controlling rigorously for potentially confounding factors. Thus, programs that promote family meals are beneficial.

Copyright of Journal of Adolescence is the property of Academic Press Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Sen, Bisakha. "The Relationship Between Frequency of Family Dinner and Adolescent Problem Behaviors After Adjusting for Other Family Characteristics." Journal of Adolescence 33,1 (February 2010): 187-196.
8. Sznitman, Sharon R.
Reisel, LIza
Khurana, Atika
Socioeconomic Background and High School Completion: Mediation by Health and Moderation by National Context
Journal of Adolescence 56 (April 2017): 118-126.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140197117300210
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent health; Cross-national Analysis; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; High School Completion/Graduates; Norway, Norwegian; Socioeconomic Background

This study uses longitudinal data from the Norwegian Health Study linked with registry data (n = 13262) and the U.S. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (n = 3604) to examine (1) whether adolescent health mediates the well-established relationship between socioeconomic background and successful high school completion, and (2) whether this mediated pathway of influence varies by national context. Adolescents from lower educated and lower income families reported poorer health, which negatively impacted their likelihood of graduating from high school. The partial mediational effect of adolescent health was stronger in the U.S. than in Norway. These results suggest that policies aimed at preventing high school dropout need to address adolescent health, in addition to the unequal opportunities derived from socioeconomic disadvantage.
Bibliography Citation
Sznitman, Sharon R., LIza Reisel and Atika Khurana. "Socioeconomic Background and High School Completion: Mediation by Health and Moderation by National Context." Journal of Adolescence 56 (April 2017): 118-126.
9. Walters, Glenn D.
Delinquency, Parental Involvement, Early Adult Criminality, and Sex: Evidence of Moderated Mediation
Journal of Adolescence 36,4 (August 2013): 777-785.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140197113000481
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Gender Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Influences

One purpose of this study was to determine whether parental involvement, measured in late adolescence, mediates the relationship between delinquency in mid-adolescence and crime in early adulthood. This study's second purpose was to ascertain whether this relationship is moderated by sex, such that late adolescent parental involvement mediates the delinquency-crime relationship in females but not in males. A secondary analysis of data provided by 579 (272 males, 307 females) members of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child (NLSYC) was conducted in an effort to evaluate the possibility of moderated mediation in the relationship between delinquency at age 16, parental involvement at age 18, and criminality at age 24. Moderated mediation analysis, path analysis, and causal mediation analysis revealed the presence of a conditional indirect relationship between delinquency, parental involvement, and adult crime moderated by sex. These results are consistent with views on cumulative disadvantage and gendered pathways to crime.
Bibliography Citation
Walters, Glenn D. "Delinquency, Parental Involvement, Early Adult Criminality, and Sex: Evidence of Moderated Mediation." Journal of Adolescence 36,4 (August 2013): 777-785.
10. Walters, Glenn D.
Peer Influence or Projection Bias? Predicting Respondent Delinquency with Perceptual Measures of Peer Delinquency in 22 Samples
Journal of Adolescence 70 (January 2019): 1-12.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140197118301921
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Britain, British; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations

Introduction: The current study was designed to determine whether the peer influence effect is the direct result of respondents projecting their own delinquency onto peers in a process referred to as projection bias.

Methods: Data from 22 gender-homogeneous U.S. and British samples (Ns = 154 to 4098) of individuals under the age of 17 at the time of initial assessment were used to create partial correlations between perceptual measures of peer delinquency and subsequent respondent offending, controlling for concurrent respondent offending.

Conclusions: These results are inconsistent with projection bias as a complete explanation for the peer influence effect and suggest that perceived peer delinquency has a demonstrable and meaningful effect on future offending in adolescents. Despite the lack of support for the projection hypothesis, there is still a need to include additional variables in the analyses (i.e., direct measures of peer delinquency and differential respondent opportunities to observe peer behavior) while entertaining alternative explanations of the perceived peer delinquency-future offending relationship (i.e., hearsay and rejecting delinquency/non-delinquency).

Bibliography Citation
Walters, Glenn D. "Peer Influence or Projection Bias? Predicting Respondent Delinquency with Perceptual Measures of Peer Delinquency in 22 Samples." Journal of Adolescence 70 (January 2019): 1-12.