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Source: Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Beck, Scott Herman
Cole, Bettie S.
Hammond, Judith A.
Religious Heritage and Premarital Sex: Evidence from a National Sample of Young Adults
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 30,2 (June 1991): 173-180.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/1387211
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Society for the Scientific Study of Religion
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Behavior; Gender Differences; Marital Status; Parental Influences; Racial Differences; Religious Influences; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Sexual Experiences/Virginity

Previous studies on attitudes or behavior regarding premarital sex of teenagers and young adults have generally found that while measures of religiosity are important, church affiliation has little, if any, impact. However, most of these studies used crude categorizations of affiliation. In this study, a more specific typology of religious organizations is created to assess the impact of religious heritage (parents' religious affiliation), as well as the affiliations of the young respondents, on premarital sexual intercourse. Data from the 1979 and 1983 interviews of the NLSY were used and four subsamples were created: white females, white males, black females and black males. Logistic regression was used to model the effects of religious affiliation contrasts along with control variables on two dichotomous dependent variables, premarital sex and teenage sex. For both white females and white males, a heritage of institutionalized sect membership produced the lowest likelihoods of premarital sex. In certain models for the female and male white samples, Fundamentalists and Baptists also displayed lower probabilities of premarital sex compared to the contrast group of Mainline Protestants. Affiliation differences in premarital sex behavior were muted in the black samples, and among black males there were no significant differences. In special subsamples of white female and male the institutionalized sect group exhibited the lowest probabilities of premarital sex, even when controlling for church attendance. It thus appears that religious heritage is a relevant factor not only in the formation of attitudes regarding sexuality but also in regard to sexual behavior of adolescents and young adults.
Bibliography Citation
Beck, Scott Herman, Bettie S. Cole and Judith A. Hammond. "Religious Heritage and Premarital Sex: Evidence from a National Sample of Young Adults." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 30,2 (June 1991): 173-180.
2. Hill, Jonathan P.
Higher Education as Moral Community: Institutional Influences on Religious Participation During College
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 48,3 (September 2009): 515-534.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-5906.2009.01463.x/full
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Society for the Scientific Study of Religion
Keyword(s): College Characteristics; Colleges; Religion; Religious Influences

Borrowing from the literature on religion and deviance, the concept of moral communities is applied to religious and secular postsecondary education to explain institutional influences on student religious participation. Results from nationally representative panel data indicate that students attending Catholic and mainline Protestant affiliated institutions decline in religious participation at a faster rate than students attending evangelical institutions or students attending nonreligious public colleges and universities. This finding is consistent with Catholic and mainline Protestant institutions less successfully providing a shared moral order that legitimates religious language, motive, and behavior when compared to conservative Protestant colleges. At the same time, the religious and ethnic pluralism that activates minority religious identity at nonreligious public institutions is also less likely to be present on Catholic and mainline Protestant college campuses. Additional results indicate that evangelical students' religious participation declines while attending Catholic colleges and universities, while Catholic students increase their participation while attending evangelical institutions. The religious composition of students may act to alter friendship networks, and thus participation rates, on these campuses, although further research is necessary to validate the proposed institutional mechanisms.
Bibliography Citation
Hill, Jonathan P. "Higher Education as Moral Community: Institutional Influences on Religious Participation During College." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 48,3 (September 2009): 515-534.
3. Kim, Jeannie
The Academic Advantage of Devotion: Measuring Variation in the Value of Weekly Worship in Late Adolescence on Educational Attainment Using Propensity Score Matching
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 54,3 (September 2015): 555-574.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jssr.12219/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Society for the Scientific Study of Religion
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Family Income; Propensity Scores; Religious Influences

This study measures the effect of regular worship attendance at age 17 on total years of schooling by age 25, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Expanding on previous work, this study estimates differences in the impact of worship attendance by race and family income status using propensity score matching. Individuals who frequently attend religious services complete .69 more years of schooling than similar individuals who do not frequently attend services. There are significantly greater returns to attendance for low-income youth and no significant difference in returns by religious affiliation. These findings suggest that religious observance provides greater benefits for low-income individuals or perhaps provides resources high-income individuals have access to elsewhere. Moreover, this study extends previous work by examining a more recent and nationally representative sample of youth and by using methods that allow for greater causal inference.
Bibliography Citation
Kim, Jeannie. "The Academic Advantage of Devotion: Measuring Variation in the Value of Weekly Worship in Late Adolescence on Educational Attainment Using Propensity Score Matching." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 54,3 (September 2015): 555-574.
4. Loury, Linda Datcher
Does Church Attendance Really Increase Schooling?
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 43,1 (March 2004): 119-127.
Also: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1468-5906.2004.00221.x?cookieSet=1
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Society for the Scientific Study of Religion
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Family Influences; Mothers, Education; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Religion; Religious Influences; Schooling

This article shows that religiosity during adolescence has a significant effect on total number of years of schooling attained. It differs from previous research by focusing on church attendance rather than on denomination and by controlling more completely for the effects of omitted-variables bias. Any estimated correlation between church attendance and schooling without such controls may reflect unmeasured family, community, and individual characteristics. The size of the effect for individuals who attended church 52 weeks per year compared to individuals who do not attend at all is equivalent to over three years of parents' schooling. This finding implies that changes in church attendance, either due to exogenous changes in attitudes or as an indirect effect of government or other institutional activity, may have large spill-over effects on socioeconomic variables.
Bibliography Citation
Loury, Linda Datcher. "Does Church Attendance Really Increase Schooling? ." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 43,1 (March 2004): 119-127.
5. Petts, Richard James
Miscarriage, Religious Participation, and Mental Health
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 57,1 (March 2018): 109-122.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jssr.12500
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Society for the Scientific Study of Religion
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Religion

Approximately 15–20 percent of pregnancies result in miscarriage, yet pregnancy loss remains a socially taboo topic and one that has received limited attention in the literature. Utilizing nationally representative longitudinal data from the NLSY97, this study examines the influence of miscarriage on mental health and whether this relationship is moderated by religious participation. Results from this study suggest that miscarriage is associated with lower mental health among women who also experience a live birth. Results also suggest that religious participation moderates the relationship between miscarriage and mental health; religion is more likely to lead to increases in mental health among women who experience a miscarriage than among women who do not experience a miscarriage. Overall, evidence suggests that religion may be an important coping mechanism for women who deal with pregnancy loss.
Bibliography Citation
Petts, Richard James. "Miscarriage, Religious Participation, and Mental Health." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 57,1 (March 2018): 109-122.
6. Petts, Richard James
Trajectories of Religious Participation from Adolescence to Young Adulthood
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 48,3 (September 2009): 552–571.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-5906.2009.01465.x/full
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Society for the Scientific Study of Religion
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Family Influences; Family Structure; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Interaction; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Religion; Religious Influences; Transition, Adulthood

Using a life course approach, this study examines trajectories of religious participation from early adolescence through young adulthood. Distinct patterns of religious participation are identified, providing insight into how trajectories are shaped by family and religious characteristics and demonstrating the influence of life events on changes in religious participation. The study employs a group-based method of trajectory analysis, identifying three trajectories of stable religious participation (nonattendance, occasional attendance, and frequent attendance) and three trajectories of change (early, late, and gradual declining attendance). Residing with two biological parents and in a religious family increases the likelihood that youth attend religious services throughout adolescence. Religious disaffiliation is associated with lower religious participation for youth in all trajectories; marriage, cohabitation, and religious switching/conversion are associated with changes in participation among youth in the frequent and occasional attendance trajectories only.
Bibliography Citation
Petts, Richard James. "Trajectories of Religious Participation from Adolescence to Young Adulthood." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 48,3 (September 2009): 552–571. A.