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Source: JCPR - Joint Center for Poverty Research
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Gibson, Diane M.
Food Stamp Program Participation and Obesity: Estimates from the NLSY79
JCPR Working Paper No. 279, Joint Center for Poverty Research, September 2002.
Also: http://www.jcpr.org/wp/WPprofile.cfm?ID=321
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Joint Center for Poverty Research
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Food Stamps (see Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); Obesity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the relationship between Food Stamp Program (FSP) participation and adult obesity. Based on past empirical research and the human capital model of the demand for health developed by Grossman (1972), the expected relationship between FSP participation and obesity is indeterminate. This paper uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) to examine this relationship empirically and estimates reduced form models of the demand for health with obesity and body mass index (BMI) as the outcomes of interest. A benefit of using the NLSY79 is that it is possible to include detailed controls for current income, FSP participation and long-term eligibility for and participation in the FSP, as well as individual fixed effects.

Current and long-term FSP participation are positively and significantly related to obesity and BMI for low-income women in models with individual fixed effects. The estimates suggest that benefits from the FSP do not have the same relationship to obesity and BMI as cash income or as other benefits provided by the government. Current FSP participation is associated with approximately a 9.2% increase in the predicted probability of obesity and five years of FSP participation in the previous five years is associated with approximately a 19.4% increase in the predicted probability of obesity for low-income women. The relationship between FSP participation and BMI, although statistically significant, is considerably smaller in percentage terms. Current FSP participation is associated with approximately a 0.7% increase in predicted BMI and five years of FSP participation in the previous five years is associated with approximately a 2.8% increase in predicted BMI for low-income women. Current and long-term FSP participation are not significantly related to obesity for low-income married men in models with individual fixed effects. However, long-term FSP participation is positively and significantly related to BMI. Five years of FSP participation in the previous five years is associated with approximately a 3.3% increase in predicted BMI for low-income married men.

Bibliography Citation
Gibson, Diane M. "Food Stamp Program Participation and Obesity: Estimates from the NLSY79." JCPR Working Paper No. 279, Joint Center for Poverty Research, September 2002.
2. Kalil, Ariel
Kunz, James Peter
Long-Term Effects of Teenage Childbearing on Mental Health in Young Adulthood
Presented: Evanston, IL, Nothrwestern University, Joint Center for Poverty Research: Poverty Research Seminars 2000-2001, May 2001.
Also: http://www.jcpr.org/povsem/teenmoms_paper.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Joint Center for Poverty Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Birth; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); CESD (Depression Scale); Depression (see also CESD); Family Background; Fertility; Health, Mental; Marriage; Parental Marital Status; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

High levels of depressive symptoms among teenage mothers are typically attributed to the "impact" or "consequences" of early parenting; recent studies, however, challenge the view that negative life outcomes observed among teenage childbearers are attributable to early childbearing, per se, suggesting instead that pre-childbearing selection factors play an important role. We draw on data from 609 black and white adolescents in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) to test the relative contribution of age and marital status at first birth to depressive symptomatology measured during young adulthood (ages 27-29). At the univariate level, teenage childbearers display, as expected, significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms during young adulthood than women who first give birth as married adults. These differences are dramatically reduced and no longer significant once pre-childbearing individual background characteristics, measured during adolescence, are controlled. Academic achievement and self-esteem measured in early adolescence are especially important in explaining differences among the groups in mental health in later life.
Bibliography Citation
Kalil, Ariel and James Peter Kunz. "Long-Term Effects of Teenage Childbearing on Mental Health in Young Adulthood." Presented: Evanston, IL, Nothrwestern University, Joint Center for Poverty Research: Poverty Research Seminars 2000-2001, May 2001.
3. Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth
Income Changes and Cognitive Stimulation in Young Children's Home Learning Environments
Working Paper No. 312, Joint Center for Poverty Research, October 2002.
Also: http://www.jcpr.org/wpfiles/Votruba-Drzal.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Joint Center for Poverty Research
Keyword(s): Cognitive Development; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Household Income; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Preschool Children; School Entry/Readiness

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. Early home learning environments are the result of interactions between the developing child and the opportunity structures provided by the family. Income is one of several resources that affect the cognitive stimulation that children experience. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N=2174) this study examines the influence of household income on cognitive stimulation during the transition to school (3-4 years old to 7-8 years old). Cross-sectional and longitudinal fixed effects regressions are estimated to examine income's effect. Household income was positively related to the level of cognitive stimulation in children's home environments across both sets of analyses. Home environments of children in low-income households were particularly sensitive to income changes over time. The implications of these results for programs and policies that reduce disparities in school readiness are discussed. This study focuses on five birth cohorts of children captured in the NLSY-CS at age 3-4 (time 1) and then again at age 7-8 (time 2), to maximize the focus on school readiness. (Uses the cognitive subscale of the HOME as an outcome measure.)
Bibliography Citation
Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth. "Income Changes and Cognitive Stimulation in Young Children's Home Learning Environments." Working Paper No. 312, Joint Center for Poverty Research, October 2002.